Pat Robertson Hates Alzheimer's Patient Even More than He Hates Gay People

Twalbert

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More Republican cruelty is on display today, as Pat Robertson — the Super Jesus All-Star Televangelist who was a 1988 Republican presidential candidate — advocated one man divorce his Alzheimer-stricken wife.

It's an interesting concept. Marriage is an absolute sacrament, not to be taken lightly. In it, you vow to be together until death...or inconvenience? I forgot about Jesus' Sermon on the Hill, where he decided that political elites had their own set of rules about marriage and love and divorce.

Source: Pat Robertson Hates Alzheimer's Patient Even More than He Hates Gay People | Benzinga
 

domonkoz

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Hes an evangalist priest.. I.E he is scum. You expected more from this snake charmer?
 

editec

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Given that Chistendom didn't even sanction marriage in its early years, the idea that marriage is a CHRISTIAN RITE is a tad overstated.

There is nothing inhernently anti-Christian about divorce.

But, FWIW, IMHO, Pat Robertson IS scum, but that doesn't mean he's always wrong.
 

waltky

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GPS Shoes will help track Alzheimer's patients...
:clap2:
GPS Shoes, for Alzheimer's Patients and Prostitutes?
October 27, 2011 | These boots were really made for walking.
The first batch of 3,000 shoes with integrated GPS devices -- to help track down dementia-suffering seniors who wander off and get lost -- just shipped from manufacturer GTX Corp. to the footwear firm Aetrex, two years after plans were announced to develop the product. The company's first shoes -- dreamed up back in 2002 following the Elizabeth Smart case -- were intended to locate missing children. And safety is the driving force today behind the company's newest GPS-enabled shoe. According to AFP, The shoes will sell at around $300 a pair and buyers will be able to set up a monitoring service to locate "wandering" seniors suffering from Alzheimer's Disease.

The system is implanted in the heel of an otherwise normal shoe, and lets caregivers or family members monitor the wearer and even set up alerts if a person strays outside of a predefined area. The shoes were certified by the Federal Communications Commission this year. GTX believes the market has great potential, given the soaring costs of Alzheimer's. "This is a significant milestone for both companies and while the $604 billion worldwide cost of dementia has become and will continue to be a significant fiscal challenge, the under $300 GPS enabled shoes will ease the enormous physical and emotional burden borne by Alzheimer's victims, caregivers and their geographically distant family members," said Patrick Bertagna, chief executive of GTX Corp.

Health professionals say the new GPS shoes could be a real boon for the more than five million Americans who suffer from the disease, according to AFP. Andrew Carle, a professor at George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services, said the shoes may even save lives. "It's especially important for people in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's
who are at the highest risk," Carle told AFP. "They might be living in their home but they're confused. They go for a walk and they can get lost for days."

But well before GTX untied its newest product, another manufacturer strode into the picture with a decidedly different demographic -- prostitutes. "Our first shoe, a demo version of the Platform 001 sandal, was inspired by the prostitutes of ancient Greece and Rome, who enticed clients with their flutes and sandals that left 'follow me' footprints in the earth," explains the website for The Aphrodite Project. "Our contemporary sandals combine these poetic images from antiquity with promotional and safety features designed to meet the needs of today’s sex workers." The Aphrodite Project's sandals are designed to protect with a piercing siren to scare off threatening muggers or attackers and a GPS-powered system that can send warnings to police.

Read more: GPS Shoes, For Alzheimer's Patients And Prostitutes? | Fox News
 

waltky

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Kinda late in tellin' us don't ya think?, November almost over...
:eusa_eh:
Caregivers Boost Alzheimer's Awareness
November 28, 2011 - November is National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month
November is National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month and Family Caregiver Month. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's. U.S. President Barack Obama called upon the people of the United States to learn more about Alzheimer's and to offer support to people living with the disease, as well as their caregivers.

Climbing mountains

Alan Arnette, a 55-year-old mountain climber, was one of those caregivers. His sport and his job, as an IT company executive, took a back seat when his mother, Ida, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2007. “So, after a 30-year career, I took early retirement to oversee the last three years of her journey through the disease," Arnette says. "And as she was going through the disease, I learned a lot. I didn’t know a lot about Alzheimer’s disease before.”

After his mother’s death, Arnette felt sad and helpless. But not for long. “I thought if I could combine my passion for climbing in a way to help educate people, to raise awareness and more tangibly to try to raise a million dollars for research funds, then this might make a difference.” Arnette decided to climb the tallest mountain on each of the world's seven continents. He called it “The 7 Summits Climb for Alzheimer’s: Memories are Everything Campaign.” “I took a satellite phone with me and I did very extensive blogging. Almost every day, I would post a new dispatch, along with pictures and videos from each one of the climbs.”

And from the highest point on each mountain, Arnette dedicated his climb to some aspect of the disease. “For example, in Antarctica, I dedicated it to early onset. I had a good friend at age 52, she had just been diagnosed, so it was fresh in my mind. Of course, Mount Everest, I dedicated it to my mom, Ida, and to all the moms out there with Alzheimer’s disease.”

Stepping toward the mainstream
See also:

Virtual Center Keeps Seniors on Their Toes
November 28, 2011 - Program offers activities despite having no building
In a small community in Virginia, elderly residents have developed a program that helps them stay active and involved, without having a huge impact on the local government budget. Edna Ludden, 71, attends one of four line-dancing classes offered to seniors in the Burke and West Springfield neighborhoods in Fairfax County. The weekly program is popular among the elderly residents with more than 60 participants in each class. "I love it. I like to come. It is good to get some exercise, it makes me happy," says Ludden. "It's good for my brain because I have to remember these steps."

This is just one of the activities that wasn’t available in her neighborhood until two years ago, when Corazon Foley asked county officials to start a local senior center. “At first, they said we could not do it because there was no money nor a staff," Foley recalls. "So I told them, 'Well, what is the money for?' and they said 'To build a center.' I said 'You do not have to build a center, you can just ask the churches and the other groups who have facilities to donate their facilities.'” So the Burke/West Springfield Senior Center Without Walls, a senior center with programs but without a building, was created.

Using facilities donated by churches, schools, libraries and businesses, the virtual center offers a dozen programs and activities such as yoga, Tai Chi, book clubs and computer classes. The nominal $5 fee participants pay for each eight-week class goes to the instructor. Annette Devito, who is taking a computer class, says she always tries to learn new things. “One of the main things was learning about Facebook, too. That was the highlight today.”

Shirley Dibartolo and her husband enjoy square dancing and try not to miss a class. “I think the socialization is very good," she says. "We have made a lot of new friends and we have been more active. It makes you get out because you are going to go to class.” John Cook, a member of the County Board of Supervisors, says the Senior Center Without Walls is a great example of how a public-private partnership can do what the government alone can not. “County staff is actively involved but it is also a program that is run by citizen volunteers, and that is a great combination to have.”

The seniors' efforts and the creative partnership have been noticed. The group, Burke/West Springfield Senior Center Without Walls, received a 2010 Commitment Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for integrating smart growth and active aging, and an award this year from the National Association of Counties. “When you help the seniors get better," Foley says, "you are helping the families, and the whole community get better in that sense.” Foley also says seniors who stay physically active can help the nation address its health care crisis, while having lots of fun.

Source
 
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blastoff

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More Republican cruelty is on display today, as Pat Robertson — the Super Jesus All-Star Televangelist who was a 1988 Republican presidential candidate — advocated one man divorce his Alzheimer-stricken wife.

It's an interesting concept. Marriage is an absolute sacrament, not to be taken lightly. In it, you vow to be together until death...or inconvenience? I forgot about Jesus' Sermon on the Hill, where he decided that political elites had their own set of rules about marriage and love and divorce.

Source: Pat Robertson Hates Alzheimer's Patient Even More than He Hates Gay People | Benzinga
I'll see your Rev. Robertson Republican presidential candidate, and raise you one Rev. Sharpton Democratic presidential candidate. See, neither side as a corner on the bozo market in politics.
 

waltky

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Diet can affect Alzheimer's onset...
:cool:
Alzheimer's: Diet 'can stop brain shrinking'
Diet affected tests of memory and thinking skills
A diet rich in vitamins and fish may protect the brain from ageing while junk food has the opposite effect, research suggests. Elderly people with high blood levels of vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids had less brain shrinkage and better mental performance, a Neurology study found. Trans fats found in fast foods were linked to lower scores in tests and more shrinkage typical of Alzheimer's. A UK medical charity has called for more work into diet and dementia risk. The best current advice is to eat a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables, not smoke, take regular exercise and keep blood pressure and cholesterol in check, said Alzheimer's Research UK.

The research looked at nutrients in blood, rather than relying on questionnaires to assess a person's diet. US experts analysed blood samples from 104 healthy people with an average age of 87 who had few known risk factors for Alzheimer's. They found those who had more vitamin B, C, D and E in their blood performed better in tests of memory and thinking skills. People with high levels of omega 3 fatty acids - found mainly in fish - also had high scores. The poorest scores were found in people who had more trans fats in their blood. Trans fats are common in processed foods, including cakes, biscuits and fried foods.

The researchers, from Oregon Health and Science University, Portland; Portland VA Medical Center; and Oregon State University, Corvallis, then carried out brain scans on 42 of the participants. They found individuals with high levels of vitamins and omega 3 in their blood were more likely to have a large brain volume; while those with high levels of trans fat had a smaller total brain volume. Study author Gene Bowman of Oregon Health and Science University said: "These results need to be confirmed, but obviously it is very exciting to think that people could potentially stop their brains from shrinking and keep them sharp by adjusting their diet."

'Strong potential'

Co-author Maret Traber of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University said: "The vitamins and nutrients you get from eating a wide range of fruits, vegetables and fish can be measured in blood biomarkers. "I'm a firm believer these nutrients have strong potential to protect your brain and make it work better." Commenting on the study, Dr Simon Ridley, head of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, said:

"One strength of this research is that it looked at nutrients in people's blood, rather than relying on answers to a questionnaire. "It's important to note that this study looked at a small group of people with few risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, and did not investigate whether they went on to develop Alzheimer's at a later stage. "There is a clear need for conclusive evidence about the effect of diet on our risk of Alzheimer's, which can only come from large-scale, long-term studies."

BBC News - Alzheimer's: Diet 'can stop brain shrinking'
 

waltky

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Uncle Ferd says, "Oops, too late fer Granny...
:confused:
US wants effective Alzheimer's treatment by 2025
Tue Jan 17,`12 WASHINGTON – Effective treatments for Alzheimer's by 2025? That's the target the government is eyeing as it develops a national strategy to tackle what could become the defining disease of a rapidly aging population.
It's an ambitious goal — and on Tuesday, advisers to the government stressed that millions of families need better help now to care for their loved ones. "What's really important here is a comprehensive plan that deals with the needs of people who already have the disease," said Alzheimer's Association president Harry Johns, one of the advisers. Already families approach the advisory committee "reminding us of the enormity of our task," said Dr. Ron Petersen, an Alzheimer's specialist at the Mayo Clinic who chairs the panel. The Obama administration is developing the first National Alzheimer's Plan to address the medical and social problems of dementia — not just better treatments but better day-to-day care for dementia patients and their overwhelmed caregivers, too.

The plan still is being written, with the advisory panel's input. But a draft of its overall goals sets 2025 as a target date to have effective treatments and ways to delay if not completely prevent the illness. Some advisory members said that's not aggressive enough, and 2020 would be a better target date. "We want to be bold," said Dr. Jennifer Manly of Columbia University. "We think the difference of five years is incredibly meaningful." Regardless, an estimated 5.4 million Americans already have Alzheimer's or similar dementias — and how to help their families cope with day-to-day care is a priority, the advisory committee made clear Tuesday.

The disease is growing steadily as the population ages: By 2050, 13 million to 16 million Americans are projected to have Alzheimer's, costing $1 trillion in medical and nursing home expenditures. That doesn't count the billions of dollars in unpaid care provided by relatives and friends. Today's treatments only temporarily ease some dementia symptoms, and work to find better ones has been frustratingly slow. Scientists now know that Alzheimer's is brewing for years before symptoms appear, and they're hunting ways to stall the disease, maybe long enough that potential sufferers will die of something else first. But it's still early-stage work. Meanwhile, as many as half of today's Alzheimer's sufferers haven't been formally diagnosed, a recent report found. That's in part because of stigma and the belief that nothing can be done. Symptomatic treatment aside, a diagnosis lets families plan, and catching Alzheimer's earlier would be crucial if scientists ever find a way to stall it, the advisory panel noted.

Among the goals being debated for the national plan:

_Begin a national public awareness campaign of dementia's early warning signs, to improve timely diagnosis.

_Give primary care doctors the tools to assess signs of dementia as part of Medicare's annual check-up.

_Have caregivers' health, physical and mental, regularly checked.

_Improve care-planning and training for families so they know what resources are available for their loved one and themselves.

A training program in New York, for instance, has proved that caregivers who are taught how to handle common dementia problems, and given support, are able to keep their loved ones at home for longer. Such programs "are dirt cheap compared to paying for nursing home care," said David Hoffman, who oversees Alzheimer's programs for the New York State Department of Health. But hanging over the meeting was the reality of a budget crunch. The government hasn't said how much money it will be able to devote to the Alzheimer's plan, and states have seen their own Alzheimer's budgets cut. "We're not going to fix this without substantial resources," Hoffman said. "In New York, we're hanging on by our nails," he added.

US wants effective Alzheimer's treatment by 2025 - Yahoo! News
 
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waltky

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possum thinks dat's why Uncle Ferd spends a lot of time onna computer...
:cool:
Mental Stimulation Might Cut Dementia Risk
January 27, 2012 - Keeping sharp could reduce brain protein linked to Alzheimer's
People who engage in mentally-stimulating activities over a lifetime have lower levels of a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds. That supports other research which suggests reading, writing and playing games may lower the risk of dementia. Researchers worked with a group of 65 older-adult volunteers with no symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease. They answered questions about how often they engaged in stimulating mental activities throughout their lifetimes. They also got PET brain scans which can identify beta-amyloid deposits. Those deposits are found in the brains of people who have Alzheimer's.

University of California-Berkeley research scientist Susan Landau says the study showed a link between the quantity of deposits and the lifetime level of brain stimulation. "People who were the most cognitively active throughout their life, they had the least amyloid in their brains," she says. "So, based on this association between greater cognitive activity and less amyloid, we think that these people will go on to have a reduced risk of Alzheiemer's Disease."

Keep in mind that the people in this study, many of them in their 70s and 80s, did not show any symptoms of Alzheimer's. Scientists are still trying to understand the connection between beta-amyloid deposits in the brain and dementia. Aging and a family history of Alzheimer's are both considered risk factors, but we can't control those. And even if your brain hasn't been particularly active up until now, Landau says it's not too late to start ratcheting up your mental activities.

"I think that cognitive stimulation is probably beneficial at any age. But, what our findings from this study show, is that the more cognitively active you can be over the course of your lifespan, the better" Landau says she and her colleagues plan to follow the volunteers in this study as they age, to see whether there is a link between lifetime mental activity and Alzheimer's symptoms as some of them develop dementia in the years ahead. That may help the researchers better understand the relationship between stimulating mental activities, beta-amyloid deposits and dementia.

Source
 
R

rdean

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When he remembers who he hates, I'm pretty sure gays are at the top of the list.
 

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