CDZ my opinion on the Derick Chauvin case

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peacefan

peacefan

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
So yu do not have a problem with home invasions and threatening a woman with a gun? That is where you and I differ
my point is, he was convicted for that crime, served his time, and was let go for another try at an honest life.
for some, that's all they get. a chance. a slim chance.
 
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peacefan

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
He didn't get a death penalty from anyone but himself and his dope use and 15 minutes of resisting arrest. The officers were far too tolerant in handling his sorry ass, at considerable risk to themselves and bystanders.
are you implying that the knee + 90 pounds of bodyweight on Floyd's lungs and neck *didn't* have something to do with Floyd's death?
 

jc456

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
do you know what compliance is?
 

jc456

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
He didn't get a death penalty from anyone but himself and his dope use and 15 minutes of resisting arrest. The officers were far too tolerant in handling his sorry ass, at considerable risk to themselves and bystanders.
are you implying that the knee + 90 pounds of bodyweight on Floyd's lungs and neck *didn't* have something to do with Floyd's death?
nope it didn't. you can't prove it did. It's a visual thing that has you thinking that. Do you believe the four or five experts the prosecution brought in that having an enlarged heart, high blood pressure, and two arteries clogged over 75%, with one of the two at 90% is a healthy person? Do you think it healthy for that person to assert the amount of energy that Floyd gave as healthy for his condition?

Are you also saying that Floyd had no fault in his own death?
 

Dont Taz Me Bro

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Dont Taz Me Bro

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
 

Meathead

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
Any verdict of guilt will be overturned on appeal because the judge did not sequester the jury while another thug got shot by the police and a very disgusting congresswoman opened her big mouth.
 

jc456

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
I'm still curious on why someone would commit a crime and then when caught would fight not to be arrested for the crime that was done. Especially, when the store owner gave him an out by allowing him to simply return the stolen cigarette pack back.

Floyd's own action was the trigger for the entire confrontation that he decided he was having none of.

What's additionally funny for me was the mere lack of respect Floyd had for his own town by throwing a banana peel into the street earlier. I hadn't seen that until the closing arguments. what a loser, now a dead one by his own actions.
 

jc456

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
Any verdict of guilt will be overturned on appeal because the judge did not sequester the jury while another thug got shot by the police and a very disgusting congresswoman opened her big mouth.
indeed.
 

GMCGeneral

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.
So what you want, ghetto trash, is to totally end all police forces. Scum like you support criminals like Floyd.
 

jc456

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.
So what you want, ghetto trash, is to totally end all police forces. Scum like you support criminals like Floyd.
posters like that dude don't care about other's rights.
 
OP
peacefan

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
do you know what compliance is?
yes, and from the video evidence shown during closing arguments in this case, which i watched live and almost entirely yesterday, mr Floyd was fully compliant with police orders, they even handcuffed him in a friendly way, but when they asked him to take place in that relatively tiny back of a police car, mr Floyd went gradually into a state of total panic.
as i said before, police training methods have to change (imo) to switch from violent takedowns that end up restricting someone's breathing (the infamous knees on the lungs and neck of mr Floyd, or anyone else in the future), to letting a person wait for alternative transportation while upright, tasers held and announced to be used as the response to a flee attempt.

police also have to be trained to use verbal skills to de-escalate a situation like that.

if you defund the police, you're providing opportunity to criminals.
but if you'd just have 2 of those officers standing by with tasers drawn and announced, near, but not too near mr Floyd while Floyd is handcuffed, and 2 more for crowd control with mace drawn and ready, then you have the situation under control, but that does not mean that once compliance is shown, and for as long as compliance is shown by the crowd and the suspect, it can be useful to distract people with calm, friendly conversation. This conversation should at least include *why* the suspect is being detained, and what his first reactions to those charges would be (if any).
 

rightwinger

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.

I think they are going third degree murder.
Not sure that requires intent.
 
OP
peacefan

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
He didn't get a death penalty from anyone but himself and his dope use and 15 minutes of resisting arrest. The officers were far too tolerant in handling his sorry ass, at considerable risk to themselves and bystanders.
are you implying that the knee + 90 pounds of bodyweight on Floyd's lungs and neck *didn't* have something to do with Floyd's death?
nope it didn't. you can't prove it did. It's a visual thing that has you thinking that. Do you believe the four or five experts the prosecution brought in that having an enlarged heart, high blood pressure, and two arteries clogged over 75%, with one of the two at 90% is a healthy person? Do you think it healthy for that person to assert the amount of energy that Floyd gave as healthy for his condition?

Are you also saying that Floyd had no fault in his own death?
For me, as a martial artist, well, they had him pinned down, complete chest on the pavement, head on the pavement, knee on his neck, knee on his upper chest area, hands tied behind his back, it tells *me* at least that one might get serious problems breathing while held down, with that many pounds pressing down on you, for that long, all the while getting your arms twisted as well (screaming uses a lot of oxygen from the blood).
 

rightwinger

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
I'm still curious on why someone would commit a crime and then when caught would fight not to be arrested for the crime that was done. Especially, when the store owner gave him an out by allowing him to simply return the stolen cigarette pack back.

Floyd's own action was the trigger for the entire confrontation that he decided he was having none of.

What's additionally funny for me was the mere lack of respect Floyd had for his own town by throwing a banana peel into the street earlier. I hadn't seen that until the closing arguments. what a loser, now a dead one by his own actions.
Is that really the best defense you can come up with?
 
OP
peacefan

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide

Agreed, however, manslaughter, not murder. The legal definition of murder in most states requires intent and there is nothing to indicate Chauvin intended on killing Floyd.
I'm still curious on why someone would commit a crime and then when caught would fight not to be arrested for the crime that was done. Especially, when the store owner gave him an out by allowing him to simply return the stolen cigarette pack back.

Floyd's own action was the trigger for the entire confrontation that he decided he was having none of.

What's additionally funny for me was the mere lack of respect Floyd had for his own town by throwing a banana peel into the street earlier. I hadn't seen that until the closing arguments. what a loser, now a dead one by his own actions.
might it occur to you that Floyd might've just had a worse draw of luck at birth than you did?
 

Donald H

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Clean debate demands that it's seen as coldblooded murder.
Maybe that's being confused with debate by extremist Americans that is never clean debate.
 

GMCGeneral

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