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CDZ my opinion on the Derick Chauvin case

Hossfly

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unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
The defense has been lying about everything from the start. It's no wonder you're completely wrong about the facts of this case.
If you have been watching the defense final argument you would have noticed 3 armed officers could not get him into the car. He resisted arrest and he could breath or he wouldn't have been blabbering. And isn't it a little odd for him to be claustrophobic in a police car after being awakened from a peaceful slumber in his own car?
the combination of getting arrested and being put in the police car, *could* have let to a form of panic overcoming Floyd.

You ever been in a firefight and not be panicked? I have. A few times. A perfectly healthy man with a strong heart and drug free will overcome panic.
 

beautress

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Floyd was *not* violent scum, now was he?! Plenty of other suspects aren't *either*.

Being violent or not is irrelevant. Being a CRIMINAL in relevant. CRIMINALS deserve to die; by whatever means are necessary.
he was being held over a supposed counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
you're saying he should die over that?

jeez.
He resisted arrest during his overdose of drugs that can synergize when taken as part of a lethal drug cocktail. The cop went by the book in subduing an out of control suspect. Having to subdue a suspect who threatens the safety of himself and others is an express duty of the oath police take to serve and protect others, and that was his motive for following administrative orders written in the police policies book.
 

Hossfly

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If you have been watching the defense final argument you would have noticed 3 armed officers could not get him into the car. He resisted arrest and he could breath or he wouldn't have been blabbering. And isn't it a little odd for him to be claustrophobic in a police car after being awakened from a peaceful slumber in his own car?
How do you explain all the footage of Chauvin removing Floyd from the very car you're claiming they couldn't get him into?
Another one who isn't watching the closing arguments. Chauvin is innocent and I don't give a hoot if they burn every Democrat city in the country down
I'm just curious; are you willing to change police training as i have outlined in this thread?
Police are and have been trained sufficiently. That was defined in the defense closing arguments.
 
OP
peacefan

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unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
The defense has been lying about everything from the start. It's no wonder you're completely wrong about the facts of this case.
If you have been watching the defense final argument you would have noticed 3 armed officers could not get him into the car. He resisted arrest and he could breath or he wouldn't have been blabbering. And isn't it a little odd for him to be claustrophobic in a police car after being awakened from a peaceful slumber in his own car?
the combination of getting arrested and being put in the police car, *could* have let to a form of panic overcoming Floyd.

You ever been in a firefight and not be panicked? I have. A few times. A perfectly healthy man with a strong heart and drug free will overcome panic.
what's normal to you does not need to be the norm for another person, dude.
 

Desperado

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.
Maybe the criminals need better training on how to stay alive when getting arrested. With Floyd dead the world is better off without him
 
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peacefan

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Floyd was *not* violent scum, now was he?! Plenty of other suspects aren't *either*.

Being violent or not is irrelevant. Being a CRIMINAL in relevant. CRIMINALS deserve to die; by whatever means are necessary.
he was being held over a supposed counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
you're saying he should die over that?

jeez.
He resisted arrest during his overdose of drugs that can synergize when taken as part of a lethal drug cocktail. The cop went by the book in subduing an out of control suspect. Having to subdue a suspect who threatens the safety of himself and others is an express duty of the oath police take to serve and protect others, and that was his motive for following administrative orders written in the police policies book.
i just disagree with the notion that all criminals deserve to die.
 

Hossfly

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Floyd was *not* violent scum, now was he?! Plenty of other suspects aren't *either*.

Being violent or not is irrelevant. Being a CRIMINAL in relevant. CRIMINALS deserve to die; by whatever means are necessary.
he was being held over a supposed counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
you're saying he should die over that?

jeez.
He resisted arrest during his overdose of drugs that can synergize when taken as part of a lethal drug cocktail. The cop went by the book in subduing an out of control suspect. Having to subdue a suspect who threatens the safety of himself and others is an express duty of the oath police take to serve and protect others, and that was his motive for following administrative orders written in the police policies book.

The Floyd defenders never watched the defense closing arguments so I'm not replying to those dumb asses anymore
 
OP
peacefan

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Maybe the criminals need better training on how to stay alive when getting arrested. With Floyd dead the world is better off without him
his first offense in years, was to supposedly pay at a store with a counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
and you think that justifies his death.

jeez.
 

Hossfly

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unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
The defense has been lying about everything from the start. It's no wonder you're completely wrong about the facts of this case.
If you have been watching the defense final argument you would have noticed 3 armed officers could not get him into the car. He resisted arrest and he could breath or he wouldn't have been blabbering. And isn't it a little odd for him to be claustrophobic in a police car after being awakened from a peaceful slumber in his own car?
the combination of getting arrested and being put in the police car, *could* have let to a form of panic overcoming Floyd.

You ever been in a firefight and not be panicked? I have. A few times. A perfectly healthy man with a strong heart and drug free will overcome panic.
what's normal to you does not need to be the norm for another person, dude.

Prosecution said the almost dead druggie was as healthy as Superman. Case closed!
 

Desperado

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Maybe the criminals need better training on how to stay alive when getting arrested. With Floyd dead the world is better off without him
his first offense in years, was to supposedly pay at a store with a counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
and you think that justifies his death.

jeez.
Lets just say it was his lifetime achievements that got him the award. He was no angel.
 
OP
peacefan

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unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
The defense has been lying about everything from the start. It's no wonder you're completely wrong about the facts of this case.
If you have been watching the defense final argument you would have noticed 3 armed officers could not get him into the car. He resisted arrest and he could breath or he wouldn't have been blabbering. And isn't it a little odd for him to be claustrophobic in a police car after being awakened from a peaceful slumber in his own car?
the combination of getting arrested and being put in the police car, *could* have let to a form of panic overcoming Floyd.

You ever been in a firefight and not be panicked? I have. A few times. A perfectly healthy man with a strong heart and drug free will overcome panic.
what's normal to you does not need to be the norm for another person, dude.

Prosecution said the almost dead druggie was as healthy as Superman. Case closed!
Video evidence of the time of Chauvin's arrival shows a Floyd who is resisting being put in the relatively tiny back of a police car because he is claustrophobic. At that time, he also clearly showed signs of panic.
Case re-opened.
 
OP
peacefan

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Maybe the criminals need better training on how to stay alive when getting arrested. With Floyd dead the world is better off without him
his first offense in years, was to supposedly pay at a store with a counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
and you think that justifies his death.

jeez.
Lets just say it was his lifetime achievements that got him the award. He was no angel.
All of which would have been minor offenses, or he would be in prison, not on the streets.
Still think he deserved death? Then you're just heartless and/or a racist.
 

Desperado

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Maybe the criminals need better training on how to stay alive when getting arrested. With Floyd dead the world is better off without him
his first offense in years, was to supposedly pay at a store with a counterfeit 20-dollar bill.
and you think that justifies his death.

jeez.
Lets just say it was his lifetime achievements that got him the award. He was no angel.
All of which would have been minor offenses, or he would be in prison, not on the streets.
Still think he deserved death? Then you're just heartless and/or a racist.

Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.
 
OP
peacefan

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
 

DudleySmith

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.

Nah, they just need to deport your ilk, is all.
 

DudleySmith

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
He didn't get a death penalty from anyone but himself and his dope use and 15 minutes of resisting arrest. The officers were far too tolerant in handling his sorry ass, at considerable risk to themselves and bystanders.
 

Desperado

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Here is the information on your angel Floyd

George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for atleast 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998
Just another career criminal off the streets for good.

ok, so he wasn't exactly a true angel.

but i still see no offenses worthy of a death penalty in your report!
So yu do not have a problem with home invasions and threatening a woman with a gun? That is where you and I differ
 

midcan5

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peacefan, the next time a police officer knees on your neck for 9 minutes let us know how you feel.

I come a large family and police can be as dangerous as criminals. Power corrupts many.
 

phoenyx

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peacefan, the next time a police officer knees on your neck for 9 minutes let us know how you feel.

I come a large family and police can be as dangerous as criminals. Power corrupts many.

Based on what peacefan said in the OP, it seems clear to me that he also doesn't think that Floyd should have put his knee on Chauvin's neck.
 
OP
peacefan

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peacefan, the next time a police officer knees on your neck for 9 minutes let us know how you feel.

I come a large family and police can be as dangerous as criminals. Power corrupts many.
they wouldn't, coz i ain't ever resisted arrest, nor will i ever.
and btw, i've been busted for very minor infractions that landed me a night in police station lockup, nothing more than that.
 

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