CDZ my opinion on the Derick Chauvin case

peacefan

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
 

miketx

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
Great post! Excellent! Too bad most violent scum won't cooperate! lol
 
OP
peacefan

peacefan

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
Great post! Excellent! Too bad most violent scum won't cooperate! lol
Floyd was *not* violent scum, now was he?!
Plenty of other suspects aren't *either*.
 

miketx

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
Great post! Excellent! Too bad most violent scum won't cooperate! lol
Floyd was *not* violent scum, now was he?!
Plenty of other suspects aren't *either*.
Lol, goodbye. You ain't got no sense.
 

task0778

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IMHO, Chauvin did use excessive force, there wasn't a need to keep his knee on Floyd's neck that long. BUT - an ordinary person would not have died under those circumstances, so in my view Chauvin isn't guilty of murder.
 

MarcATL

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.
 
OP
peacefan

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OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.

That's the simplistic way of looking at this.

When Chauvin arrived on the scene, all he could see was a mr Floyd who was clearly resisting being put in the police car.
But with better training, the police officers at the scene could act like i described in my 1st post in this thread.

While overcoming racism, and reverse racism, is not easy, police officers legally carry a range of tools that can be used to control a suspect.
Their tasers and what they say to a suspect, should be given greater priority than all of these takedown techniques that restrict breathing.

Or we can expect a repeat of such incidents, *and* the subsequent tensions in society (a chance for riots, i mean).
 

rightwinger

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1. The suspect was handcuffed
2. The suspect was surrounded by three armed officers
3. The suspect was on the ground and not resisting
4. The suspect claimed he was in distress
5. Observers objected that the suspect was not conscious

Homicide
 

Prof.Lunaphiles

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OP, there's absolutely no amount of training in the world that can "fix" racism and bigotry.

They need to get rid of all the bad apples, severely punishing them when necessary.
Is Black Lives Matter aware of this revelation???

And, of course, only white people can be racist.

And there is no possibility that young black men can be uncooperative because they have all been informed by "the talk," from their mothers, about their rights to resist arrest by white police.
 
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MarcATL

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That's the simplistic way of looking at this.

When Chauvin arrived on the scene, all he could see was a mr Floyd who was clearly resisting being put in the police car.
But with better training, the police officers at the scene could act like i described in my 1st post in this thread.

While overcoming racism, and reverse racism, is not easy, police officers legally carry a range of tools that can be used to control a suspect.
Their tasers and what they say to a suspect, should be given greater priority than all of these takedown techniques that restrict breathing.

Or we can expect a repeat of such incidents, *and* the subsequent tensions in society (a chance for riots, i mean).
Actually, this is super simplistic.

We just went through 3 full and solid weeks of professional testimony refuting the arguments you're making.
 

mudwhistle

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
You have to restrain a suspect to prevent them from running or resisting or posing a threat to the officers and the public.
You do understand this principle, right?
 
OP
peacefan

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That's the simplistic way of looking at this.

When Chauvin arrived on the scene, all he could see was a mr Floyd who was clearly resisting being put in the police car.
But with better training, the police officers at the scene could act like i described in my 1st post in this thread.

While overcoming racism, and reverse racism, is not easy, police officers legally carry a range of tools that can be used to control a suspect.
Their tasers and what they say to a suspect, should be given greater priority than all of these takedown techniques that restrict breathing.

Or we can expect a repeat of such incidents, *and* the subsequent tensions in society (a chance for riots, i mean).
Actually, this is super simplistic.

We just went through 3 full and solid weeks of professional testimony refuting the arguments you're making.
that, imo, just proves how wrong police training officers can be.
 
OP
peacefan

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You have to restrain a suspect to prevent them from running or resisting or posing a threat to the officers and the public.
You do understand this principle, right?
no, you can just let them stand at ease, and threaten to use your taser in case they run.
 

Slade3200

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(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
(1) per the offending officer's training, he might *not* have been unreasonable in his use of force.

(2) a slight realignment of training procedures for street cops across the world, would allow for the deceased to have stayed alive, to stand up with his back toward the car upon the realization that the now-deceased had personal problems getting into the police car. a police officer can let the person that they want to arrest, stand up, handcuffed, and with instructions not to move or a taser will be used.

this severe restraining of a person on the ground has to be let go of.

it's better than recurring tragedies *and* the follow-on riots.

this whole idea of physically restraining a person, just causes a struggle that is *likely* to result in great bodily harm, to officers or suspects, even to the audience of such events.

by letting a person stand, politely handcuffing them (if possible), and using your taser at a safe distance to keep a person in the same spot,
a chance for dialogue evolves and *can* be brought to fruition (in the Derick Chauvin case : arrival of a police van to transport the suspect.)

police just needs some verbal de-escalation skills worked into their recurring training.

CNN, US Media : use this please, to direct attention from "demonstrations" (riots) to preventing a repeat of such incidents through "police reform", which does not even need to include a "defunding" of the police.

and finally, what fate awaits the defendant in this case, if he has to go to jail for decades?
will it be a normal jail, or one designed to house only ex-police officers.

as we all know from the movies, ordinary jail is no place to house an ex-police officer.
it's simply put exceedingly excessive punishment.

the deceased's suffering was over in about 15 minutes total.

do we put the man who accidentally caused his death in conditions of near torturous punishment for *decades* over this?

the only thing that's left, is to blame this entire event on erroneously designed police training, and for the jury to acquit the defendant.
You make fair points about training and I think moving forward that should be a large area of focus for improvement. But for this case training was not at fault for Floyd’s death. You can blame training and justify the over aggressive manner that Floyd was treated through his first encounter through the probe constraint outside of the car. But at that point Floyd should have been sat up and calmed down. He had sat on the sidewalk and cooperated up until he freaked out about getting into the car. There was no reason to lay him on the ground and sit on his neck for 10 minutes. That’s ridiculous. The cop is guilty and should be punished. It’s clear as day. The defense is throwing as many distractions as they can at this thing but none of them have anything to do with the heart of the issue. If this cop goes free expect A Rodney King style reaction from the public.
 

MarcATL

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that, imo, just proves how wrong police training officers can be.
I have no idea what you're referring to, but the testimonies came from all sorts of various professional fields that completely refute your claims. We just saw this for hours on end daily for the last 3 weeks. This cop and his fellow thugs in blue were in the wrong. They killed an innocent man who was not posing a threat to them or anyone else.
 

mudwhistle

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You have to restrain a suspect to prevent them from running or resisting or posing a threat to the officers and the public.
You do understand this principle, right?
no, you can just let them stand at ease, and threaten to use your taser in case they run.
Clearly you know nothing about law-enforcement dealing with violent criminals.
 
OP
peacefan

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that, imo, just proves how wrong police training officers can be.
I have no idea what you're referring to, but the testimony came from all sorts of various professional fields that refutes your claims. We just saw this for hours on end daily for the last 3 weeks. This cop and his fellow thugs were in the wrong. They killed an innocent man who was not posing a threat to them or anyone else.
unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
 

MarcATL

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unlike you, i've been following the final remarks of the defense, and they make clear that a police officer has to consider his training, the larger picture of the situation at hand, and the surroundings.
based on the testimony of the training officer who was in charge of Chauvin's training, Chauvin did no act unreasonably.
based on the testimony of the doctor in charge of Floyd's autopsy, the 'recent use of meth', was a contributing factor to Floyd's death.
The defense has been lying about everything from the start. It's no wonder you're completely wrong about the facts of this case.
 

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