Mississippi Governor Declares April as Confederate Heritage Month

protectionist

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They fought against the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Nazi soldiers, Imperial Japanese, North Koreans also fought bravely for their homelands.

We do not celebrate their “Lost Cause”
Thy were every bit as much the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, as any other part of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and when the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was attacking them, the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was attacking the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

And nobody is celebrating any "cause". Sorry that I have to interfere with your agenda.
 

protectionist

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You are partially correct.
Those statues were erected as a reminder to those blacks seeking the right to vote, to be treated as equals of their proper place in life.

See a group of blacks protesting for their right to vote, the best response is to wave the Confederate flag at them.

View attachment 361976
No, that's NOT why the statues were erected. They were erected to >>

1. Honor the courage of the soldiers who fought (though many of them - draftees - did not choose to)

2. To heal the wounds of war, and show friendship again between all the states.
 

protectionist

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Interesting choice of words when you support those who fought against the USA and for the forces of slavery
Aren‘t those who defend slavery scum?
They didn't fight for slavery, as has already been explained here over a dozen times. Must feel pretty cheap to have to turn a blind eye to the truth. I'd hate to go through life like that.

As for your claim of >> "fought against the USA", I'll ask you the same question I asked Tom Paine (which he dodged, & never did answer) If hundreds of guys came to your town, and were shooting at you, blowing up your buildings with cannon fire, and burning down your churches, what would you do ? Multiple choice question >>

A. Nothing
B. Say thank you to them
C. Offer them lollipops
D. Offer them an ice cream cone
E. Defend yourself and your family, and town, and shoot back
 

rightwinger

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Interesting choice of words when you support those who fought against the USA and for the forces of slavery
Aren‘t those who defend slavery scum?
They didn't fight for slavery, as has already been explained here over a dozen times. Must feel pretty cheap to have to turn a blind eye to the truth. I'd hate to go through life like that.

As for your claim of >> "fought against the USA", I'll ask you the same question I asked Tom Paine (which he dodged, & never did answer) If hundreds of guys came to your town, and were shooting at you, blowing up your buildings with cannon fire, and burning down your churches, what would you do ? Multiple choice question >>

A. Nothing
B. Say thank you to them
C. Offer them lollipops
D. Offer them an ice cream cone
E. Defend yourself and your family, and town, and shoot back
You keep avoiding the obvious. The Confederacy was formed for the purpose of ensuring the perpetual existence of slavery. It was a nation that had 40 percent of its population in bondage.

Fighting for the Confederacy was fighting for slavery.
 

rightwinger

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They fought against the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Nazi soldiers, Imperial Japanese, North Koreans also fought bravely for their homelands.

We do not celebrate their “Lost Cause”
Thy were every bit as much the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, as any other part of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and when the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was attacking them, the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA was attacking the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

And nobody is celebrating any "cause". Sorry that I have to interfere with your agenda.
They were part of the United States of America
They chose to turn against their country and take up arms against it.

They did not wait for Union forces to invade them to decide to fight back. As soon as the Confederacy was formed, they made a call to arms. A Confederate Army was not just needed to fight off any Union attack, but to ensure slaves did not attempt to revolt.
 

Correll

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THey are treasonous, anti-American scum.
Interesting choice of words when you support those who fought against the USA and for the forces of slavery
Aren‘t those who defend slavery scum?
Slavery became a moot point long ago in this country. Even when the statues were put up, it was a long dead issue.


Your pretense of not knowing that, is you being an asshole.
You are partially correct.
Those statues were erected as a reminder to those blacks seeking the right to vote, to be treated as equals of their proper place in life.

See a group of blacks protesting for their right to vote, the best response is to wave the Confederate flag at them.
...



YOu asked a "question". I answered it. Your next post, instead of addressing my response, just sort of threw some new shit against the wall.


Because you never cared about your question. Because it was not really a question. It was a zinger, you hoped, thinly disguised as a zinger.


YOu are nothing but a troll asshole.
 

Tom Paine 1949

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War is hell. Many Southerners in the Civil War (Northerners and Westerners too) discovered that. Those who engage in war to defend slavery, just like those who go to war to protect colonies and neo-colonies overseas, even if they believe they are “protecting liberty” and their way of life, can hardly complain when they lose and suffer the consequences of their folly. Especially when they had full democratic rights and merely lost an election to ... Republicans. Republicans who only sought to end slavery’s expansion.

Many in the South opposed the war, deserted, or went over to the Union side. Not even here talking about the 3.5 million slaves in the Old South, or the 500,000 in the border states.

Anyone who doesn’t understand by now that slavery was the root cause of secession and that the “irrepressible conflict” over decades was rooted in the different interests of a slave oligarchy and its way of life and the mid-19th century emerging system of capitalist industry, “free labor,” “free farmers” and “free men” in the North and West, is wearing historical blinders. Of course the war itself created bitter emnities — it always does.

What was unusual is that the large section of our nation which were emancipated from slavery by the Civil War, four million African Americans, were made into scapegoats and “untouchables” soon after its end. As Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Dubois noted, black people were blamed for the war, and victimized by the peace and supposed “reconciliation” that followed. They were no longer legal chattel slaves, but were terrorized by Jim Crow and disenfranchised. Poor whites or “Republican carpet baggers” who worked in union leagues or supported Reconstruction governments were vilified as “n***** lovers.” That was when the “Noble Lost Cause” myth began and most of the monuments to the Confederacy were conceived.

So profound questions of “legacy” and “heritage” remain ... often complex questions that can and should be resolved in a democratic and open manner, where all voices are heard and weighed. In passing I would add that even the legal successes of the Civil Rights Movement, brought about largely by the heroic struggles of African-Americans after WWII, did not suddenly reverse the influence of Lost Cause “Dunning School” historians. That took time.

That the Civil Rights Movement was later “memorialized” by making MLK an almost sainted figure was to be expected and certainly represented progress, but we shouldn’t forget that if the U.S. was not then engaged in a world struggle for influence with the USSR in Africa and the Third World, elites and mainstream politicians in both parties may have allowed MLK’s movement to be crushed.

Our generation faces the old issues of interpreting history fairly and honestly, and many new issues of economics, social decay, crime, political polarization, and our declining position in the world. The dangerous intersection of all these different issues means that even while disagreeing passionately over historical questions we must maintain democratic norms, keep calm and rational, show respect where possible, and isolate the maniacs who preach racial or regional civil war or armed conflict.
 
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protectionist

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You keep avoiding the obvious. The Confederacy was formed for the purpose of ensuring the perpetual existence of slavery. It was a nation that had 40 percent of its population in bondage.

Fighting for the Confederacy was fighting for slavery.
Sorry, your time has expired for the phony 40 % claim. I challenged that and you did not respond. That settles it as untrue.

Your claim that "Fighting for the Confederacy was fighting for slavery." is simply FALSE. It has been refuted repreatedly in this thread. I'll do it yet AGAIN.

1. Most uniformed Confederate soldiers were DRAFTEES who were not fighting for anything, except to stay of of jail, for draft-dodging. And jails in the South back then were worse than they are today.

2. The overwhelming majority of southern fighters were CIVILIANS, simply defending their families, homes, and towns.

So we're back again to the question that YOU and Tom Paine "keep avoiding" >>>

If hundreds of guys came to your town, and were shooting at you, blowing up your buildings with cannon fire, and burning down your churches, what would you do ? Multiple choice question >>

A. Nothing
B. Say thank you to them
C. Offer them lollipops
D. Offer them an ice cream cone
E. Defend yourself and your family, and town, and shoot back
 

protectionist

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War is hell. Many Southerners in the Civil War (Northerners and Westerners too) discovered that. Those who engage in war to defend slavery, just like those who go to war to protect colonies and neo-colonies overseas, even if they believe they are “protecting liberty” and their way of life, can hardly complain when they lose and suffer the consequences of their folly. Especially when they had full democratic rights and merely lost an election to ... Republicans. Republicans who only sought to end slavery’s expansion.

Many in the South opposed the war, deserted, or went over to the Union side. Not even here talking about the 3.5 million slaves in the Old South, or the 500,000 in the border states.

Anyone who doesn’t understand by now that slavery was the root cause of secession and that the “irrepressible conflict” over decades was rooted in the different interests of a slave oligarchy and its way of life and the mid-19th century emerging system of capitalist industry, “free labor,” “free farmers” and “free men” in the North and West, is wearing historical blinders. Of course the war itself created bitter emnities — it always does.

What was unusual is that the large section of our nation which were emancipated from slavery by the Civil War, four million African Americans, were made into scapegoats and “untouchables” soon after its end. As Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Dubois noted, black people were blamed for the war, and victimized by the peace and supposed “reconciliation” that followed. They were no longer legal chattel slaves, but were terrorized by Jim Crow and disenfranchised. Poor whites or “Republican carpet baggers” who worked in union leagues or supported Reconstruction governments were vilified as “n***** lovers.” That was when the “Noble Lost Cause” myth began and most of the monuments to the Confederacy were conceived.

So profound questions of “legacy” and “heritage” remain ... often complex questions that can and should be resolved in a democratic and open manner, where all voices are heard and weighed. In passing I would add that even the legal successes of the Civil Rights Movement, brought about largely by the heroic struggles of African-Americans after WWII, did not suddenly reverse the influence of Lost Cause “Dunning School” historians. That took time.

That the Civil Rights Movement was later “memorialized” by making MLK an almost sainted figure was to be expected and certainly represented progress, but we shouldn’t forget that if the U.S. was not then engaged in a world struggle for influence with the USSR in Africa and the Third World, elites and mainstream politicians in both parties may have allowed MLK’s movement to be crushed.

Our generation faces the old issues of interpreting history fairly and honestly, and many new issues of economics, social decay, crime, political polarization, and our declining position in the world. The dangerous intersection of all these different issues means that even while disagreeing passionately over historical questions we must maintain democratic norms, keep calm and rational, show respect where possible, and isolate the maniacs who preach racial or regional civil war or armed conflict.
And one way we "keep calm and rational, show respect where possible, and isolate the maniacs who preach racial or regional civil war or armed conflict." is by arresting and imprisoning the maniacs who preach racial or regional civil war or armed conflict by tearing down statues, defacing monuments, removing or burning flags.

And it is worthless to spend time talking about "Those who engage in war to defend slavery" when the only ones who did that were a TINY minority of politicians. Are those politicians part of the Confederate Heritage Month ? Maybe that's what we could be asking, and finding out. What exactly does this Confederate Heritage Month refer to and consist of ?
 

Andylusion

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Because they fought bravely against great odds, in defense of their homelands.
They fought against the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Nazi soldiers, Imperial Japanese, North Koreans also fought bravely for their homelands.

We do not celebrate their “Lost Cause”
G-d bless the Japanese. If Japan joined the United States as a State, we would not immediately tear down all the memorials, such as the memorial to the Kamikaze Pilots.
Screenshot_2020-07-11 image jpg (JPEG Image, 256 × 409 pixels).png


Those pilots are part of their history, and like good people.... we don't try and destroy people's history.

Garbage disgusting people do that, and they should be ashamed.
 

protectionist

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They were part of the United States of America
They chose to turn against their country and take up arms against it.

They did not wait for Union forces to invade them to decide to fight back. As soon as the Confederacy was formed, they made a call to arms. A Confederate Army was not just needed to fight off any Union attack, but to ensure slaves did not attempt to revolt.
They fight a defensive war against the US Army, similar to the Vietnamese.
 

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