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It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem

bear513

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

It's not the lead solder, it's the lead pipes.
 
OP
bear513

bear513

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

It's not the lead solder, it's the lead pipes.

Ya use lead solder when pipe sweating copper and brass. Numb scull, any lead is bad for you.
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

It's not the lead solder, it's the lead pipes.

Ya use lead solder when pipe sweating copper and brass. Numb scull, any lead is bad for you.

Yes, you use lead solder. The people in Flint weren't poisoned because of lead in the solder, it's because the pipes were made of lead. Durr.
 
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bear513

bear513

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

It's not the lead solder, it's the lead pipes.

Ya use lead solder when pipe sweating copper and brass. Numb scull, any lead is bad for you.

Yes, you use lead solder. The people in Flint weren't poisoned because of lead in the solder, it's because the pipes were made of lead. Durr.


This thread is about the link in the OP which you obviously didn't read, dork.
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

It's not the lead solder, it's the lead pipes.

Ya use lead solder when pipe sweating copper and brass. Numb scull, any lead is bad for you.

Yes, you use lead solder. The people in Flint weren't poisoned because of lead in the solder, it's because the pipes were made of lead. Durr.


This thread is about the link in the OP which you obviously didn't read, dork.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country.

You were saying?
 

waltky

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Childhood threshold level for lead to be reviewed for lowering standard...
icon_cool.gif

CDC Considers Lowering Threshold Level for Lead Exposure
December 30, 2016 — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is considering lowering its threshold for elevated childhood blood lead levels by 30 percent, a shift that could help health practitioners identify more children afflicted by the heavy metal.
Since 2012, the CDC, which sets public health standards for exposure to lead, has used a blood lead threshold of 5 micrograms per deciliter for children under age 6. While no level of lead exposure is safe for children, those who test at or above that level warrant a public health response, the agency says. Based on new data from a national health survey, the CDC may lower its reference level to 3.5 micrograms per deciliter in the coming months, according to six people briefed by the agency. The measure will come up for discussion at a CDC meeting January 17 in Atlanta. But the step, which has been under consideration for months, could prove controversial. One concern: Lowering the threshold could drain sparse resources from the public health response to children who need the most help – those with far higher lead levels. The CDC did not respond to a request for comment.

Exposure to lead - typically in peeling old paint, tainted water or contaminated soil - can cause cognitive impairment and other irreversible health impacts. The CDC adjusts its threshold periodically as nationwide average levels drop. The threshold value is meant to identify children whose blood lead levels put them among the 2.5 percent of those with the heaviest exposure. “Lead has no biological function in the body, and so the less there is of it in the body the better,” Bernard M Y Cheung, a University of Hong Kong professor who studies lead data, told Reuters. “The revision in the blood lead reference level is to push local governments to tighten the regulations on lead in the environment.” The federal agency is talking with state health officials, laboratory operators, medical device makers and public housing authorities about how and when to implement a new threshold.

AAF6D2C2-7F91-4F89-98A6-4AEA746AC395_w250_r1_s.jpg

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention headquarters in Atlanta.​

Since lead was banned in paint and phased out of gasoline nearly 40 years ago, average childhood blood lead levels have fallen more than 90 percent. The average is now around 1 microgram per deciliter. Yet progress has been uneven, and lead poisoning remains an urgent problem in many U.S. communities. A Reuters investigation published this month found nearly 3,000 areas with recently recorded lead poisoning rates of at least 10 percent, or double those in Flint, Michigan, during that city’s water crisis. More than 1,100 of these communities had a rate of elevated blood tests at least four times higher than in Flint. In the worst-affected urban areas, up to 50 percent of children tested in recent years had elevated lead levels.

The CDC has estimated that as many as 500,000 U.S. children have lead levels at or above the current threshold. The agency encourages “case management” for these children, which is often carried out by state or local health departments and can involve educating families about lead safety, ordering more blood tests, home inspections or remediation. Any change in the threshold level carries financial implications. The CDC budget for assisting states with lead safety programs this year was just $17 million, and many state or local health departments are understaffed to treat children who test high. Another concern: Many lead testing devices or labs currently have trouble identifying blood lead levels in the 3 micrograms per deciliter range. Test results can have margins of error. “You could get false positives and false negatives,” said Rad Cunningham, an epidemiologist with the Washington State Department of Health. “It’s just not very sensitive in that range.”

MORE
 

Skull Pilot

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That's why I plumbed my entire house with PEX
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

This is coming from rolling stone ....
Be doubtful,be very doubtful.
 

Skull Pilot

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

This is coming from rolling stone ....
Be doubtful,be very doubtful.

Anyway it's been illegal to used lead solder or pipes since 1986
 
OP
bear513

bear513

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

This is coming from rolling stone ....
Be doubtful,be very doubtful.

Anyway it's been illegal to used lead solder or pipes since 1986


We still use it in industry all the time.


.
 

Skull Pilot

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

This is coming from rolling stone ....
Be doubtful,be very doubtful.

Anyway it's been illegal to used lead solder or pipes since 1986


We still use it in industry all the time.


.
for potable water?
 
OP
bear513

bear513

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Ya know I forgot all about lead soder , I never even put two and two together when pipe sweating .


If you're looking for parallels to Flint, there are 11 million homes in this country, at least, that are very likely facing a pretty severe lead-in-water problem, and they don't know it," Lambrinidou says.

The reason for that, she explains, is that there are that many service lines — pipes that carry water from a utility's water main into private homes — made of lead across the country. Many utilities aren't even aware of them, she says.

That fact should trouble people, but, she adds, it's not the scariest thing. The thing people really ought to be concerned about, Lambrinidou says, is the fact that the water in Flint still, today, passes the federal government's test for lead and copper contamination.

"The sampling protocol that Flint used is to this day keeping it in compliance with the lead and copper rule, despite all the problems that we now know about," Lambrinidou says. "This is something that almost nobody knows, unless you're an expert on the specific regulation."

The rule is based on the premise that there is no way a water utility can conduct tests that would guarantee zero lead — the only safe level of lead, according to the federal government — in the water of every single home it serves.




Read more: It's Not Just Flint: America Has a Major Lead-in-Water Problem
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

This is coming from rolling stone ....
Be doubtful,be very doubtful.

Anyway it's been illegal to used lead solder or pipes since 1986


We still use it in industry all the time.


.
for potable water?


No. Not for human consumption


.
 

eflatminor

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... any lead is bad for you.

That's not entirely true. Lead is an element which means it is found in trace amount everywhere...and that's normal. In fact, even health authorities acknowledge adults with less than 10 µg/dL is typical and perfectly fine.

I work with lead from time to time and have done so my whole life. As as long as you practice a few basic safety guidelines, you're fine. I'm less than 3 µg/dL .

I do not disagree with your basic premise that many, many governmental agencies have failed to provide clean drinking water (shocker there...), but I just wanted to point out we all have lead in our bodies and that's perfectly normal as long as it's not too much.
 

eflatminor

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I haven't drank tap water in fifteen years anyway.
It's cheap to rent a dispenser and have Ozarka drop off 4 or 5 five gallon jugs a month.

Wouldn't it be cheaper yet to just filter your drinking water?
 

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