It All Began On May 15th, 1948, And Israel is not Innocent

IM2

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I don't think people really know the whole story. We see most people reflexively siding with Israel and calling those who oppose the Netanyu government Anti Semites. Seems like most people say that the Palestinians stated the war and everything is the Palestinians fault. They listen to various Jewish leaders taking about how the Palestinans sing from the river to the sea and how that's supposed to mean the Palestinians want to erase Jews. We have heard Netanyahu over and over again justifying occupations as defending Israels right to exist.

Maybe the story might just be the opposite of what we have been told.

First off, this entire stuation is the resut of another mess created by colonization. Palestine was once considred Mandatory Palestine and it was ruled by the Brits. In 1948 the Brits left Palestine and a war broke out.

The 1948 Palestine war[a] was fought in the territory of what had been, at the start of the war, British-ruled Mandatory Palestine.[12][13][14][15][16][17] During the war, the British withdrew from Palestine, Zionist forces conquered territory and established the State of Israel, and over 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled. It was the first war of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the broader Arab–Israeli conflict.

The war had two main phases, the first being the 1947–1948 civil war, which began on 30 November 1947,[18] a day after the United Nations voted to adopt the Partition Plan for Palestine, which planned for the division of the territory into Jewish and Arab sovereign states. During this period the British still maintained a declining rule over Palestine and occasionally intervened in the violence.[19][20] Towards the end of the civil war phase, Zionist forces executed Plan Dalet, an offensive operation conquering territory for the planned establishment of a Jewish state.[21]

The second phase of the war began on 14 May 1948, with the termination of the British Mandate and the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel. The following morning, the surrounding Arab armies invaded Palestine, beginning the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Egyptians advanced in the south-east while the Jordanian Arab Legion and Iraqi forces captured the central highlands. Syria and Lebanon fought with the Israeli forces in the north. The newly formed Israel Defense Forces managed to halt the Arab forces and in the following months began pushing them back and capturing territory. By the end of the war, the State of Israel had captured about 78% of former territory of the mandate, the Kingdom of Jordan had captured and later annexed the area that became the West Bank, and Egypt had captured the Gaza Strip. The war formally ended with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, which established the Green Line demarcating these territories.

During the war, massacres and acts of terror were conducted by and against both sides. A campaign of massacres and violence against the Arab population, such as occurred at Lydda and Ramle and the Battle of Haifa, led to the expulsion and flight of over 700,000 Palestinians, with most of their urban areas being depopulated and destroyed. This violence and dispossession of the Palestinians is known today as the Nakba (Arabic for "the disaster")[22] and resulted in the beginning of the Palestinian refugee problem.



The Nakba (Arabic: النكبة an-Nakbah, lit. 'The Catastrophe') was the ethnic cleansing[2] of Palestinians in Mandatory Palestine during the 1948 Palestine war through their violent displacement and dispossession of land, property, and belongings, along with the destruction of their society, culture, identity, political rights, and national aspirations.[3] The term is also used to describe the ongoing persecution and displacement of Palestinians by Israel.[4] As a whole, it covers the shattering of Palestinian society and the long-running rejection of the right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.[5][6]

During the Nakba in 1948, approximately half of Palestine's predominantly Arab population, or around 750,000 people,[7] were expelled from their homes or made to flee, at first by Zionist paramilitaries through various violent means, and after the establishment of the State of Israel, by the Israel Defense Forces. This occurred in the wake of dozens of massacres targeting Palestinian Arabs and the depopulation of 500 Arab-majority towns and villages,[8] with many of these being either completely destroyed or repopulated by Jews and given new Hebrew names. By the end of the war, 78% of the total land area of the former Mandatory Palestine was controlled by Israel and at least 15,000 Palestinian Arabs had been killed.[9][10]

The Palestinian national narrative views the Nakba as a collective trauma that defines their national identity and political aspirations, whereas the Israeli national narrative views the same events in terms of the war of independence that established their aspirations for statehood and sovereignty.[11][12][13] To this end, the Palestinians observe 15 May as Nakba Day, commemorating the war's events one day after Israel's Independence Day.[14][15] In 1967 following the Six-Day War, another series of Palestinian exodus occurred; this came to be known as the Naksa (lit. 'Setback'), and also has its own day, 5 June.

The Nakba has greatly influenced Palestinian culture and is a foundational symbol of the current Palestinian national identity, together with the political cartoon character Handala, the Palestinian keffiyeh, and the Palestinian 1948 keys. Many books, songs, and poems have been written about the Nakba.[16] Nakba denial remains prevalent despite the growing scholarship on it, such as those by the Israeli New Historians.


 
I don't think people really know the whole story. We see most people reflexively siding with Israel and calling those who oppose the Netanyu government Anti Semites. Seems like most people say that the Palestinians stated the war and everything is the Palestinians fault. They listen to various Jewish leaders taking about how the Palestinans sing from the river to the sea and how that's supposed to mean the Palestinians want to erase Jews. We have heard Netanyahu over and over again justifying occupations as defending Israels right to exist.

Maybe the story might just be the opposite of what we have been told.

First off, this entire stuation is the resut of another mess created by colonization. Palestine was once considred Mandatory Palestine and it was ruled by the Brits. In 1948 the Brits left Palestine and a war broke out.

The 1948 Palestine war[a] was fought in the territory of what had been, at the start of the war, British-ruled Mandatory Palestine.[12][13][14][15][16][17] During the war, the British withdrew from Palestine, Zionist forces conquered territory and established the State of Israel, and over 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled. It was the first war of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the broader Arab–Israeli conflict.

The war had two main phases, the first being the 1947–1948 civil war, which began on 30 November 1947,[18] a day after the United Nations voted to adopt the Partition Plan for Palestine, which planned for the division of the territory into Jewish and Arab sovereign states. During this period the British still maintained a declining rule over Palestine and occasionally intervened in the violence.[19][20] Towards the end of the civil war phase, Zionist forces executed Plan Dalet, an offensive operation conquering territory for the planned establishment of a Jewish state.[21]

The second phase of the war began on 14 May 1948, with the termination of the British Mandate and the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel. The following morning, the surrounding Arab armies invaded Palestine, beginning the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Egyptians advanced in the south-east while the Jordanian Arab Legion and Iraqi forces captured the central highlands. Syria and Lebanon fought with the Israeli forces in the north. The newly formed Israel Defense Forces managed to halt the Arab forces and in the following months began pushing them back and capturing territory. By the end of the war, the State of Israel had captured about 78% of former territory of the mandate, the Kingdom of Jordan had captured and later annexed the area that became the West Bank, and Egypt had captured the Gaza Strip. The war formally ended with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, which established the Green Line demarcating these territories.

During the war, massacres and acts of terror were conducted by and against both sides. A campaign of massacres and violence against the Arab population, such as occurred at Lydda and Ramle and the Battle of Haifa, led to the expulsion and flight of over 700,000 Palestinians, with most of their urban areas being depopulated and destroyed. This violence and dispossession of the Palestinians is known today as the Nakba (Arabic for "the disaster")[22] and resulted in the beginning of the Palestinian refugee problem.



The Nakba (Arabic: النكبة an-Nakbah, lit. 'The Catastrophe') was the ethnic cleansing[2] of Palestinians in Mandatory Palestine during the 1948 Palestine war through their violent displacement and dispossession of land, property, and belongings, along with the destruction of their society, culture, identity, political rights, and national aspirations.[3] The term is also used to describe the ongoing persecution and displacement of Palestinians by Israel.[4] As a whole, it covers the shattering of Palestinian society and the long-running rejection of the right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.[5][6]

During the Nakba in 1948, approximately half of Palestine's predominantly Arab population, or around 750,000 people,[7] were expelled from their homes or made to flee, at first by Zionist paramilitaries through various violent means, and after the establishment of the State of Israel, by the Israel Defense Forces. This occurred in the wake of dozens of massacres targeting Palestinian Arabs and the depopulation of 500 Arab-majority towns and villages,[8] with many of these being either completely destroyed or repopulated by Jews and given new Hebrew names. By the end of the war, 78% of the total land area of the former Mandatory Palestine was controlled by Israel and at least 15,000 Palestinian Arabs had been killed.[9][10]

The Palestinian national narrative views the Nakba as a collective trauma that defines their national identity and political aspirations, whereas the Israeli national narrative views the same events in terms of the war of independence that established their aspirations for statehood and sovereignty.[11][12][13] To this end, the Palestinians observe 15 May as Nakba Day, commemorating the war's events one day after Israel's Independence Day.[14][15] In 1967 following the Six-Day War, another series of Palestinian exodus occurred; this came to be known as the Naksa (lit. 'Setback'), and also has its own day, 5 June.

The Nakba has greatly influenced Palestinian culture and is a foundational symbol of the current Palestinian national identity, together with the political cartoon character Handala, the Palestinian keffiyeh, and the Palestinian 1948 keys. Many books, songs, and poems have been written about the Nakba.[16] Nakba denial remains prevalent despite the growing scholarship on it, such as those by the Israeli New Historians.


Sounds like you need to start whining for Palestinian Reparations.
 
I don't think people really know the whole story. We see most people reflexively siding with Israel and calling those who oppose the Netanyu government Anti Semites. Seems like most people say that the Palestinians stated the war and everything is the Palestinians fault. They listen to various Jewish leaders taking about how the Palestinans sing from the river to the sea and how that's supposed to mean the Palestinians want to erase Jews. We have heard Netanyahu over and over again justifying occupations as defending Israels right to exist.

Maybe the story might just be the opposite of what we have been told.

First off, this entire stuation is the resut of another mess created by colonization. Palestine was once considred Mandatory Palestine and it was ruled by the Brits. In 1948 the Brits left Palestine and a war broke out.

The 1948 Palestine war[a] was fought in the territory of what had been, at the start of the war, British-ruled Mandatory Palestine.[12][13][14][15][16][17] During the war, the British withdrew from Palestine, Zionist forces conquered territory and established the State of Israel, and over 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled. It was the first war of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the broader Arab–Israeli conflict.

The war had two main phases, the first being the 1947–1948 civil war, which began on 30 November 1947,[18] a day after the United Nations voted to adopt the Partition Plan for Palestine, which planned for the division of the territory into Jewish and Arab sovereign states. During this period the British still maintained a declining rule over Palestine and occasionally intervened in the violence.[19][20] Towards the end of the civil war phase, Zionist forces executed Plan Dalet, an offensive operation conquering territory for the planned establishment of a Jewish state.[21]

The second phase of the war began on 14 May 1948, with the termination of the British Mandate and the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel. The following morning, the surrounding Arab armies invaded Palestine, beginning the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Egyptians advanced in the south-east while the Jordanian Arab Legion and Iraqi forces captured the central highlands. Syria and Lebanon fought with the Israeli forces in the north. The newly formed Israel Defense Forces managed to halt the Arab forces and in the following months began pushing them back and capturing territory. By the end of the war, the State of Israel had captured about 78% of former territory of the mandate, the Kingdom of Jordan had captured and later annexed the area that became the West Bank, and Egypt had captured the Gaza Strip. The war formally ended with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, which established the Green Line demarcating these territories.

During the war, massacres and acts of terror were conducted by and against both sides. A campaign of massacres and violence against the Arab population, such as occurred at Lydda and Ramle and the Battle of Haifa, led to the expulsion and flight of over 700,000 Palestinians, with most of their urban areas being depopulated and destroyed. This violence and dispossession of the Palestinians is known today as the Nakba (Arabic for "the disaster")[22] and resulted in the beginning of the Palestinian refugee problem.



The Nakba (Arabic: النكبة an-Nakbah, lit. 'The Catastrophe') was the ethnic cleansing[2] of Palestinians in Mandatory Palestine during the 1948 Palestine war through their violent displacement and dispossession of land, property, and belongings, along with the destruction of their society, culture, identity, political rights, and national aspirations.[3] The term is also used to describe the ongoing persecution and displacement of Palestinians by Israel.[4] As a whole, it covers the shattering of Palestinian society and the long-running rejection of the right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.[5][6]

During the Nakba in 1948, approximately half of Palestine's predominantly Arab population, or around 750,000 people,[7] were expelled from their homes or made to flee, at first by Zionist paramilitaries through various violent means, and after the establishment of the State of Israel, by the Israel Defense Forces. This occurred in the wake of dozens of massacres targeting Palestinian Arabs and the depopulation of 500 Arab-majority towns and villages,[8] with many of these being either completely destroyed or repopulated by Jews and given new Hebrew names. By the end of the war, 78% of the total land area of the former Mandatory Palestine was controlled by Israel and at least 15,000 Palestinian Arabs had been killed.[9][10]

The Palestinian national narrative views the Nakba as a collective trauma that defines their national identity and political aspirations, whereas the Israeli national narrative views the same events in terms of the war of independence that established their aspirations for statehood and sovereignty.[11][12][13] To this end, the Palestinians observe 15 May as Nakba Day, commemorating the war's events one day after Israel's Independence Day.[14][15] In 1967 following the Six-Day War, another series of Palestinian exodus occurred; this came to be known as the Naksa (lit. 'Setback'), and also has its own day, 5 June.

The Nakba has greatly influenced Palestinian culture and is a foundational symbol of the current Palestinian national identity, together with the political cartoon character Handala, the Palestinian keffiyeh, and the Palestinian 1948 keys. Many books, songs, and poems have been written about the Nakba.[16] Nakba denial remains prevalent despite the growing scholarship on it, such as those by the Israeli New Historians.


I tagged you with "fake news" because as usual, you cherry pick part of the story and neglect some fundamental back story. Ironically in the Wiki link, just after what you quoted. ;
........

Jewish immigration to Palestine​


Main article: Zionism

Zionism formed in Europe as the national movement of the Jewish people. It sought to reestablish Jewish statehood in the ancient homeland. The first wave of Zionist immigration, dubbed the First Aliyah, lasted from 1882 to 1903. Some 30,000 Jews, mostly from the Russian Empire, reached Ottoman Palestine. They were driven both by the Zionist idea and by the wave of antisemitism in Europe, especially in the Russian Empire, which came in the form of brutal pogroms. They wanted to establish Jewish agricultural settlements and a Jewish majority in the land that would allow them to gain statehood.[23]

The Arab inhabitants of Ottoman Palestine who saw the Zionist Jews of the first aliyah settle next to them were not associated with a national movement at the end of the 19th century.[24]

In the beginning of the 20th century, the Jewish population of Ottoman Palestine encountered very little violence in the form of feuds and conflict over land and resources with their Arab neighbours. The Ottoman authorities often supported the Jewish settlers in disputes over land and settlement. Between 1909 and 1914, this changed, as Arabs killed 12 Jewish settlement guards and Arab nationalism and opposition to the Zionist enterprise increased. In 1911, Arabs attempted to thwart the establishment of a Jewish settlement in the Jezreel Valley, and the dispute resulted in the death of one Arab man and a Jewish guard. The Arabs called the Jews the "new Crusaders", and anti-Zionist rhetoric flourished.[25] Tensions between Arabs and Jews led to violent disturbances on several occasions, notably in 1920, 1921, 1929 and 1936–1939.
...........
 
I don't think people really know the whole story. We see most people reflexively siding with Israel and calling those who oppose the Netanyu government Anti Semites. Seems like most people say that the Palestinians stated the war and everything is the Palestinians fault. They listen to various Jewish leaders taking about how the Palestinans sing from the river to the sea and how that's supposed to mean the Palestinians want to erase Jews. We have heard Netanyahu over and over again justifying occupations as defending Israels right to exist.

Maybe the story might just be the opposite of what we have been told.

First off, this entire stuation is the resut of another mess created by colonization. Palestine was once considred Mandatory Palestine and it was ruled by the Brits. In 1948 the Brits left Palestine and a war broke out.

The 1948 Palestine war[a] was fought in the territory of what had been, at the start of the war, British-ruled Mandatory Palestine.[12][13][14][15][16][17] During the war, the British withdrew from Palestine, Zionist forces conquered territory and established the State of Israel, and over 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled. It was the first war of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the broader Arab–Israeli conflict.

The war had two main phases, the first being the 1947–1948 civil war, which began on 30 November 1947,[18] a day after the United Nations voted to adopt the Partition Plan for Palestine, which planned for the division of the territory into Jewish and Arab sovereign states. During this period the British still maintained a declining rule over Palestine and occasionally intervened in the violence.[19][20] Towards the end of the civil war phase, Zionist forces executed Plan Dalet, an offensive operation conquering territory for the planned establishment of a Jewish state.[21]

The second phase of the war began on 14 May 1948, with the termination of the British Mandate and the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel. The following morning, the surrounding Arab armies invaded Palestine, beginning the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Egyptians advanced in the south-east while the Jordanian Arab Legion and Iraqi forces captured the central highlands. Syria and Lebanon fought with the Israeli forces in the north. The newly formed Israel Defense Forces managed to halt the Arab forces and in the following months began pushing them back and capturing territory. By the end of the war, the State of Israel had captured about 78% of former territory of the mandate, the Kingdom of Jordan had captured and later annexed the area that became the West Bank, and Egypt had captured the Gaza Strip. The war formally ended with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, which established the Green Line demarcating these territories.

During the war, massacres and acts of terror were conducted by and against both sides. A campaign of massacres and violence against the Arab population, such as occurred at Lydda and Ramle and the Battle of Haifa, led to the expulsion and flight of over 700,000 Palestinians, with most of their urban areas being depopulated and destroyed. This violence and dispossession of the Palestinians is known today as the Nakba (Arabic for "the disaster")[22] and resulted in the beginning of the Palestinian refugee problem.



The Nakba (Arabic: النكبة an-Nakbah, lit. 'The Catastrophe') was the ethnic cleansing[2] of Palestinians in Mandatory Palestine during the 1948 Palestine war through their violent displacement and dispossession of land, property, and belongings, along with the destruction of their society, culture, identity, political rights, and national aspirations.[3] The term is also used to describe the ongoing persecution and displacement of Palestinians by Israel.[4] As a whole, it covers the shattering of Palestinian society and the long-running rejection of the right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.[5][6]

During the Nakba in 1948, approximately half of Palestine's predominantly Arab population, or around 750,000 people,[7] were expelled from their homes or made to flee, at first by Zionist paramilitaries through various violent means, and after the establishment of the State of Israel, by the Israel Defense Forces. This occurred in the wake of dozens of massacres targeting Palestinian Arabs and the depopulation of 500 Arab-majority towns and villages,[8] with many of these being either completely destroyed or repopulated by Jews and given new Hebrew names. By the end of the war, 78% of the total land area of the former Mandatory Palestine was controlled by Israel and at least 15,000 Palestinian Arabs had been killed.[9][10]

The Palestinian national narrative views the Nakba as a collective trauma that defines their national identity and political aspirations, whereas the Israeli national narrative views the same events in terms of the war of independence that established their aspirations for statehood and sovereignty.[11][12][13] To this end, the Palestinians observe 15 May as Nakba Day, commemorating the war's events one day after Israel's Independence Day.[14][15] In 1967 following the Six-Day War, another series of Palestinian exodus occurred; this came to be known as the Naksa (lit. 'Setback'), and also has its own day, 5 June.

The Nakba has greatly influenced Palestinian culture and is a foundational symbol of the current Palestinian national identity, together with the political cartoon character Handala, the Palestinian keffiyeh, and the Palestinian 1948 keys. Many books, songs, and poems have been written about the Nakba.[16] Nakba denial remains prevalent despite the growing scholarship on it, such as those by the Israeli New Historians.



Arab imperialists constantly shift the goalposts and rewrite history,
to pose as the victims of their violence, rape and degeneracy.

What was the excuse for violence
before any Zionist ever shot a bullet?


Report from Safed about the Arab massacres of 1834:

"Now I have come to announce the large losses and afflictions that have been created in Israel in four countries, ie Jerusalem,and Hebron and the Upper Galilee, namely Safed. And the lower Galilee, namely the city of Tabriya. By the hands of the plunderers and looters that rose in the country. And they come only upon the Jews...

On Sunday, eight days in the month of Sivan, the looters, inhabitants of the villages joined with the inhabitants of the cities. They had weapons of war and shields and fell upon all the Jews and stripped their clothes from men and women. They expelled them naked from the city, and plundered all their property...

The remnants were coerced and raped whether men or women. Tore all the Torah scrolls, and their talit and tefilin and the city was abandoned... This was so for 33 days, so was done in the city of Safed, so was done in other towns."


Periodicals of people of Israel in Eretz Israel - Menachem Mendel ben- Aaharon 1800-1873
 
I tagged you with "fake news" because as usual, you cherry pick part of the story and neglect some fundamental back story. Ironically in the Wiki link, just after what you quoted. ;
........

Jewish immigration to Palestine​


Main article: Zionism

Zionism formed in Europe as the national movement of the Jewish people. It sought to reestablish Jewish statehood in the ancient homeland. The first wave of Zionist immigration, dubbed the First Aliyah, lasted from 1882 to 1903. Some 30,000 Jews, mostly from the Russian Empire, reached Ottoman Palestine. They were driven both by the Zionist idea and by the wave of antisemitism in Europe, especially in the Russian Empire, which came in the form of brutal pogroms. They wanted to establish Jewish agricultural settlements and a Jewish majority in the land that would allow them to gain statehood.[23]

The Arab inhabitants of Ottoman Palestine who saw the Zionist Jews of the first aliyah settle next to them were not associated with a national movement at the end of the 19th century.[24]

In the beginning of the 20th century, the Jewish population of Ottoman Palestine encountered very little violence in the form of feuds and conflict over land and resources with their Arab neighbours. The Ottoman authorities often supported the Jewish settlers in disputes over land and settlement. Between 1909 and 1914, this changed, as Arabs killed 12 Jewish settlement guards and Arab nationalism and opposition to the Zionist enterprise increased. In 1911, Arabs attempted to thwart the establishment of a Jewish settlement in the Jezreel Valley, and the dispute resulted in the death of one Arab man and a Jewish guard. The Arabs called the Jews the "new Crusaders", and anti-Zionist rhetoric flourished.[25] Tensions between Arabs and Jews led to violent disturbances on several occasions, notably in 1920, 1921, 1929 and 1936–1939.
...........
I don't care what you think. The fact is that Paestinians were living on that land on May 15th, 1948 and were forced out of their homes. And you're cherrypicking stuff yourself.
 
I tagged you with "fake news" because as usual, you cherry pick part of the story and neglect some fundamental back story. Ironically in the Wiki link, just after what you quoted. ;
........

Jewish immigration to Palestine​


Main article: Zionism

Zionism formed in Europe as the national movement of the Jewish people. It sought to reestablish Jewish statehood in the ancient homeland. The first wave of Zionist immigration, dubbed the First Aliyah, lasted from 1882 to 1903. Some 30,000 Jews, mostly from the Russian Empire, reached Ottoman Palestine. They were driven both by the Zionist idea and by the wave of antisemitism in Europe, especially in the Russian Empire, which came in the form of brutal pogroms. They wanted to establish Jewish agricultural settlements and a Jewish majority in the land that would allow them to gain statehood.[23]

The Arab inhabitants of Ottoman Palestine who saw the Zionist Jews of the first aliyah settle next to them were not associated with a national movement at the end of the 19th century.[24]

In the beginning of the 20th century, the Jewish population of Ottoman Palestine encountered very little violence in the form of feuds and conflict over land and resources with their Arab neighbours. The Ottoman authorities often supported the Jewish settlers in disputes over land and settlement. Between 1909 and 1914, this changed, as Arabs killed 12 Jewish settlement guards and Arab nationalism and opposition to the Zionist enterprise increased. In 1911, Arabs attempted to thwart the establishment of a Jewish settlement in the Jezreel Valley, and the dispute resulted in the death of one Arab man and a Jewish guard. The Arabs called the Jews the "new Crusaders", and anti-Zionist rhetoric flourished.[25] Tensions between Arabs and Jews led to violent disturbances on several occasions, notably in 1920, 1921, 1929 and 1936–1939.
...........
There's always more back-story;
...

1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine​


Main articles: 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine and Arab general strike (Mandatory Palestine)

The peasant-led 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine broke out in the context of increased Jewish migration to Palestine and the plight of the rural native fallāḥīn.[27] It began with a general strike among Palestinian Arabs on 19 April 1936.[28]


Jewish insurgency in Mandatory Palestine​


Main article: Jewish insurgency in Mandatory Palestine

Particularly after the White Paper of 1939, the Zionist paramilitary organizations Irgun, Lehi, and Haganah carried out a campaign of acts of terror and sabotage.[29][30]


The Arab states​


Following World War II, the surrounding Arab states were emerging from mandatory rule. Transjordan, under the Hashemite ruler Abdullah I, gained independence from Britain in 1946 and was called Jordan in 1949, but remained under heavy British influence. Egypt gained nominal independence in 1922, but Britain continued to exert a strong influence on it until the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1936 limited Britain's presence to a garrison of troops on the Suez Canal until 1945. Lebanon became an independent state in 1943, but French troops did not withdraw until 1946, the same year Syria won its independence from France.

In 1945, at British prompting, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Transjordan, and Yemen formed the Arab League to coordinate policy among the Arab states. Iraq and Transjordan coordinated closely, signing a mutual defence treaty, while Egypt, Syria, and Saudi Arabia feared that Transjordan would annex part or all of Palestine and use it as a stepping stone to attack or undermine Syria, Lebanon, and the Hijaz.[31]


The 1947 UN Partition Plan​

....
Several more sections-paragraphs in the link.
These maps help explain some of the situation.
209px-UN_Partition_Plan_For_Palestine_1947.png


800px-Israel_and_Palestine_1st_June_1948-EN.svg.png


Cia-is-map2.png

 
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Arab imperialists constantly shift the goalposts and rewrite history,
to pose as the victims of their violence, rape and degeneracy.

So what was the Arab excuse for violence
before any Zionist ever shot a bullet?


Report from Safed about the Arab massacres of 1834:

"Now I have come to announce the large losses and afflictions that have been created in Israel in four countries, ie Jerusalem,and Hebron and the Upper Galilee, namely Safed. And the lower Galilee, namely the city of Tabriya. By the hands of the plunderers and looters that rose in the country. And they come only upon the Jews...

On Sunday, eight days in the month of Sivan, the looters, inhabitants of the villages joined with the inhabitants of the cities. They had weapons of war and shields and fell upon all the Jews and stripped their clothes from men and women. They expelled them naked from the city, and plundered all their property...

The remnants were coerced and raped whether men or women. Tore all the Torah scrolls, and their talit and tefilin and the city was abandoned... This was so for 33 days, so was done in the city of Safed, so was done in other towns."


Periodicals of people of Israel in Eretz Israel - Menachem Mendel ben- Aaharon 1800-1873
Jews do the same thing. Both sides are equally bad in this regard.
 
I don't care what you think. The fact is that Paestinians were living on that land on May 15th, 1948 and were forced out of their homes. And you're cherrypicking stuff yourself.
Those who sided with the Arab nations attacking and invading. That's the price when you pick the wrong side to fight with.

Equal numbers of Jews were expelled from Arab nations during that time as a result of the war and hostilities.

Thank you once again for showing your neo-Nazi true colors.
 
I don't think people really know the whole story. We see most people reflexively siding with Israel and calling those who oppose the Netanyu government Anti Semites. Seems like most people say that the Palestinians stated the war and everything is the Palestinians fault. They listen to various Jewish leaders taking about how the Palestinans sing from the river to the sea and how that's supposed to mean the Palestinians want to erase Jews. We have heard Netanyahu over and over again justifying occupations as defending Israels right to exist.

Maybe the story might just be the opposite of what we have been told.

First off, this entire stuation is the resut of another mess created by colonization. Palestine was once considred Mandatory Palestine and it was ruled by the Brits. In 1948 the Brits left Palestine and a war broke out.

The 1948 Palestine war[a] was fought in the territory of what had been, at the start of the war, British-ruled Mandatory Palestine.[12][13][14][15][16][17] During the war, the British withdrew from Palestine, Zionist forces conquered territory and established the State of Israel, and over 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled. It was the first war of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the broader Arab–Israeli conflict.

The war had two main phases, the first being the 1947–1948 civil war, which began on 30 November 1947,[18] a day after the United Nations voted to adopt the Partition Plan for Palestine, which planned for the division of the territory into Jewish and Arab sovereign states. During this period the British still maintained a declining rule over Palestine and occasionally intervened in the violence.[19][20] Towards the end of the civil war phase, Zionist forces executed Plan Dalet, an offensive operation conquering territory for the planned establishment of a Jewish state.[21]

The second phase of the war began on 14 May 1948, with the termination of the British Mandate and the declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel. The following morning, the surrounding Arab armies invaded Palestine, beginning the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. The Egyptians advanced in the south-east while the Jordanian Arab Legion and Iraqi forces captured the central highlands. Syria and Lebanon fought with the Israeli forces in the north. The newly formed Israel Defense Forces managed to halt the Arab forces and in the following months began pushing them back and capturing territory. By the end of the war, the State of Israel had captured about 78% of former territory of the mandate, the Kingdom of Jordan had captured and later annexed the area that became the West Bank, and Egypt had captured the Gaza Strip. The war formally ended with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, which established the Green Line demarcating these territories.

During the war, massacres and acts of terror were conducted by and against both sides. A campaign of massacres and violence against the Arab population, such as occurred at Lydda and Ramle and the Battle of Haifa, led to the expulsion and flight of over 700,000 Palestinians, with most of their urban areas being depopulated and destroyed. This violence and dispossession of the Palestinians is known today as the Nakba (Arabic for "the disaster")[22] and resulted in the beginning of the Palestinian refugee problem.



The Nakba (Arabic: النكبة an-Nakbah, lit. 'The Catastrophe') was the ethnic cleansing[2] of Palestinians in Mandatory Palestine during the 1948 Palestine war through their violent displacement and dispossession of land, property, and belongings, along with the destruction of their society, culture, identity, political rights, and national aspirations.[3] The term is also used to describe the ongoing persecution and displacement of Palestinians by Israel.[4] As a whole, it covers the shattering of Palestinian society and the long-running rejection of the right of return for Palestinian refugees and their descendants.[5][6]

During the Nakba in 1948, approximately half of Palestine's predominantly Arab population, or around 750,000 people,[7] were expelled from their homes or made to flee, at first by Zionist paramilitaries through various violent means, and after the establishment of the State of Israel, by the Israel Defense Forces. This occurred in the wake of dozens of massacres targeting Palestinian Arabs and the depopulation of 500 Arab-majority towns and villages,[8] with many of these being either completely destroyed or repopulated by Jews and given new Hebrew names. By the end of the war, 78% of the total land area of the former Mandatory Palestine was controlled by Israel and at least 15,000 Palestinian Arabs had been killed.[9][10]

The Palestinian national narrative views the Nakba as a collective trauma that defines their national identity and political aspirations, whereas the Israeli national narrative views the same events in terms of the war of independence that established their aspirations for statehood and sovereignty.[11][12][13] To this end, the Palestinians observe 15 May as Nakba Day, commemorating the war's events one day after Israel's Independence Day.[14][15] In 1967 following the Six-Day War, another series of Palestinian exodus occurred; this came to be known as the Naksa (lit. 'Setback'), and also has its own day, 5 June.

The Nakba has greatly influenced Palestinian culture and is a foundational symbol of the current Palestinian national identity, together with the political cartoon character Handala, the Palestinian keffiyeh, and the Palestinian 1948 keys. Many books, songs, and poems have been written about the Nakba.[16] Nakba denial remains prevalent despite the growing scholarship on it, such as those by the Israeli New Historians.


Revisionist history.
 
There's always more back-story;
...

1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine​


Main articles: 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine and Arab general strike (Mandatory Palestine)

The peasant-led 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine broke out in the context of increased Jewish migration to Palestine and the plight of the rural native fallāḥīn.[27] It began with a general strike among Palestinian Arabs on 19 April 1936.[28]


Jewish insurgency in Mandatory Palestine​


Main article: Jewish insurgency in Mandatory Palestine

Particularly after the White Paper of 1939, the Zionist paramilitary organizations Irgun, Lehi, and Haganah carried out a campaign of acts of terror and sabotage.[29][30]


The Arab states​


Following World War II, the surrounding Arab states were emerging from mandatory rule. Transjordan, under the Hashemite ruler Abdullah I, gained independence from Britain in 1946 and was called Jordan in 1949, but remained under heavy British influence. Egypt gained nominal independence in 1922, but Britain continued to exert a strong influence on it until the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1936 limited Britain's presence to a garrison of troops on the Suez Canal until 1945. Lebanon became an independent state in 1943, but French troops did not withdraw until 1946, the same year Syria won its independence from France.

In 1945, at British prompting, Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Transjordan, and Yemen formed the Arab League to coordinate policy among the Arab states. Iraq and Transjordan coordinated closely, signing a mutual defence treaty, while Egypt, Syria, and Saudi Arabia feared that Transjordan would annex part or all of Palestine and use it as a stepping stone to attack or undermine Syria, Lebanon, and the Hijaz.[31]


The 1947 UN Partition Plan​

....
Several more sections-paragraphs in the link.
These maps help explain some of the situation.
209px-UN_Partition_Plan_For_Palestine_1947.png


252px-Israel_and_Palestine_1st_June_1948-EN.svg.png


225px-Cia-is-map2.png

Oh yeah, there is plenty of backstory. And had Europe stayed out, these problems probably would not exist.
 
Those who sided with the Arab nations attacking and invading. That's the price when you pick the wrong side to fight with.

Equal numbers of Jews were expelled from Arab nations during that time as a result of the war and hostilities.

Thank you once again for showing your neo-Nazi true colors.
What you say doesn't seem to be the case. I'm no Nazi and my opposition to the policies of the Israeli gvernment is not hatred of Jewish people. I shall continue opposng the actions of te Israeli gvernment in this case just like the majority of the people of Israel do. The only people it seems who like what's going on are the American right wing extremists.
 
Oh yeah, there is plenty of backstory. And had Europe stayed out, these problems probably would not exist.
The same problems existed under the Ottoman Empire. Islamics can’t get along with anyone who is not Muslim, and of the same sect. Every Muslim sect will just as happily kill the members of other sects as they kill infidels.
 
Hisory of the Jews and the Levant ~ Israel ~'Palestine' goes back about 3,000 -4,000 years depending on who's his-story you want to accept. Jews/Hebrews have been there in varied numbers since then.
......

History​


Main article: History of Israel

For a chronological guide, see Timeline of Israeli history.

Early expansions of hominins out of Africa into the Levant, where Israel is located, dates back at least 1.5 million years based on traces found at the Ubeidiya prehistoric site,[45] while the Skhul and Qafzeh hominins, dating back 120,000 years, are some of the earliest traces of anatomically modern humans outside of Africa.[46] The Natufian culture emerged in the southern Levant by the 10th millennium BCE,[47] followed by the Ghassulian culture by around 4,500 BCE.[48]


Bronze and Iron Ages​


Main article: History of ancient Israel and Judah

Further information: Canaan, Israelites, Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), and Kingdom of Judah

Early references to "Canaanites" and "Canaan" appear in Near Eastern and Egyptian texts (c. 2000 BCE); these populations were structured as politically independent, territorially based city-states.[49][50] During the Late Bronze Age (1550–1200 BCE), large parts of Canaan formed vassal states paying tribute to the New Kingdom of Egypt.[51] As a result of the Late Bronze Age collapse, Canaan fell into chaos, and Egyptian control over the region collapsed.[52][53]

A people named Israel appear for the first time in the Merneptah Stele, an ancient Egyptian inscription which dates to about 1200 BCE.[54][55][fn 5][57] Ancestors of the Israelites are thought to have included ancient Semitic-speaking peoples native to this area.[58]: 78–79  Modern archaeological accounts suggest that the Israelites and their culture branched out of the Canaanite peoples[59] through the development of a distinct monolatristic—and later monotheistic—religion centered on Yahweh.[60][61] They spoke an archaic form of Hebrew, known as Biblical Hebrew.[62] Around the same time, the Philistines settled on the southern coastal plain.[63][64]

Modern archaeology has largely discarded the historicity of the narrative in the Torah concerning the patriarchs, The Exodus and the tales of conquest in the Book of Joshua, and instead views the narrative as the Israelites' national myth.[65] However, some elements of these traditions do appear to have historical roots.[66][67][68]

There is debate about the earliest existence of the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah and their extent and power. While it is unclear if there was ever a United Kingdom of Israel,[69][70] historians and archaeologists agree that the northern Kingdom of Israel existed by ca. 900 BCE[71]: 169–195 [72] and the Kingdom of Judah by ca. 850 BCE.[73][74] The Kingdom of Israel was the more prosperous of the two and soon developed into a regional power;[75] during the Omride dynasty, it controlled Samaria, Galilee, the upper Jordan Valley, the Sharon and large parts of the Transjordan.[76] Samaria, the capital, was home to one of the largest Iron Age structures in the Levant.[77][78]

The Kingdom of Israel was destroyed around 720 BCE, when it was conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire.[79] The Kingdom of Judah, with its capital in Jerusalem, later became a client state of first the Neo-Assyrian Empire and then the Neo-Babylonian Empire. It is estimated that the region's population was around 400,000 in the Iron Age II.[80] In 587/6 BCE, following a revolt in Judah, King Nebuchadnezzar II besieged and destroyed Jerusalem and Solomon's Temple,[81][82] dissolved the kingdom and exiled much of the Judean elite to Babylon, beginning the Babylonian captivity.[83] The defeat was recorded in the Babylonian Chronicles.[84][85] After capturing Babylon in 539 BCE, Cyrus the Great, founder of the Achaemenid Empire, issued a proclamation allowing the exiled Judean population to return to Judah.[86][87]
....
1024px-Kingdoms_of_Israel_and_Judah_map_830.svg.png

Map of Israel and Judah in the 9th century BCE

Classical antiquity​

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Late antiquity and the medieval period​

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Modern period and the emergence of Zionism​

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Since the existence of the Jewish diaspora, many Jews have aspired to return to "Zion".[120] The Jewish population of Palestine from the outset of Ottoman rule to the beginning of the Zionist movement, known as the Old Yishuv, comprised a minority and fluctuated in size. During the 16th century, Jewish communities struck roots in the Four Holy CitiesJerusalem, Tiberias, Hebron, and Safed—and in 1697, Rabbi Yehuda Hachasid led a group of 1,500 Jews to Jerusalem.[121] In the second half of the 18th century, Eastern European Jews who were opponents of Hasidism, known as the Perushim, settled in Palestine.[122][123]
...
 
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What you say doesn't seem to be the case. I'm no Nazi and my opposition to the policies of the Israeli gvernment is not hatred of Jewish people. I shall continue opposng the actions of te Israeli gvernment in this case just like the majority of the people of Israel do. The only people it seems who like what's going on are the American right wing extremists.
I've been hearing those bovine droppings for decades now.
Seems the "I don't hate Jews, just Zionist/Israel government" started coming from mouths of neo-Nazis shortly after 1949 Israel victory over the attempted Holocaust redo.

It's a nation of predominately "Jewish people" and their cultural government and society. As compared to the Islamic and Sharia Law based nations that border them and dominate the Middle East region.
 
So it's zions vs muzzies , which seems biz as usual

the only dif being now, the zions want the USA to have their backs

what did they do for us, after the muzzies hit us 9/11?

~S~
Well they didn't dance in the streets the way many of the "muzzies" around the world did just after 9/11/2001 and "Great Satan" was hit.

What do/did you expect the "zions" to do ?

(BTW, security classification limits what I could tell.)
 

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