I'm going to do as MLK says...

IM2

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
 

Disir

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
 

bluzman61

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
Just GROW UP, you racist.
 

bluzman61

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miketx

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
Like Dr. King? You gonna buy a white hooker?
 

Disir

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
Thanks for the post.
You're welcome. The incorporation doctrine was pivotal in individual v state fight for rights.
 

MarathonMike

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Dr. King said lots of things. You seem to focus on his militant anti-White statements for some reason. He was at his best when he was talking about the unity of all Americans.
 
OP
IM2

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
 

Disir

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Try again. This time put some thought into it.
 
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IM2

IM2

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Dr. King said lots of things. You seem to focus on his militant anti-White statements for some reason. He was at his best when he was talking about the unity of all Americans.
I know more about King than you. He was neither militant or anti white. His talk of unity pertained to whites ending racism.
 

Marion Morrison

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Here's something for you:
From somebody infinitely more wise than you.
Things were A-OK from Sly days up until Obama, Doucheranasaurus Rex.
 
Last edited:
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IM2

IM2

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Try again. This time put some thought into it.
I think that's what you might want to do because this thread is about Kings opposition to white racism.
 
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IM2

IM2

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
Just GROW UP, you racist.
Shut up scrub. I'm a grown ass man and you can't handle the truth.
 

bluzman61

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
Just GROW UP, you racist.
Shut up scrub. I'm a grown ass man and you can't handle the truth.
MORE wisdom from IQ2.....................
 

Marion Morrison

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Is the song we here from racist whites when they have no rebuttal and try derailing threads.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Protest Against a Racist Court System
On Easter Sunday in 1958, the civil-rights leader led a “prayer pilgrimage” in Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the inequality of a young man's death sentence.
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

We assemble here this afternoon on the steps of this beautiful capitol building in an act of public repentance for our community for committing a tragic and unsavory injustice. A young man, Jeremiah Reeves, who was little more than a child when he was first arrested, died in the electric chair for the charge of rape. Whether or not he was guilty of this crime is a question that none of us can answer. But the issue before us now is not the innocence or guilt of Jeremiah Reeves. Even if he were guilty, it is the severity and inequality of the penalty that constitutes the injustice. Full grown white men committing comparable crimes against Negro girls are rare ever punished, and are never given the death penalty or even a life sentence. It was the severity of Jeremiah Reeves’s penalty that aroused the Negro community, not the question of his guilt or innocence.

But not only are we here to repent for the sin committed against Jeremiah Reeves, but we are also here to repent for the constant miscarriage of justice that we confront every day in our courts. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is only the precipitating factor for our protest, not the causal factor. The causal factor lies deep down in the dark and dreary past of our oppression. The death of Jeremiah Reeves is but one incident, yes a tragic incident, in the long and desolate night of our court injustice.

It is regrettable but true that in almost any session of our city, county and state courts one can see all of the injustices which the prophet Amos so bitterly decried and which he predicted would mean the ruin of [the Israelites’] once glorious civilization. Here Negroes are robbed openly with little hope of redress. We are fined and jailed often in defiance of law. Right or wrong, a Negro’s word has little weight against a white opponent’s. And if the Negro insists on the right of his cause, as opposed to a white man’s, he is often violently treated.


I'm going to do like King meant to stand up against white racism, not ignore it and whine about being called to your responsibility as whites to end it.
Just GROW UP, you racist.
Shut up scrub. I'm a grown ass man and you can't handle the truth.
There ain't no fool like an old fool.
 

Disir

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Try again. This time put some thought into it.
I think that's what you might want to do because this thread is about Kings opposition to white racism.
Again. The issues that King was facing were solved by the remedies provided via the incorporation doctrine. This indicates that you are either uneducated and/or ignorant. What else do you have?
 

Marion Morrison

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I feel lots of love coming from my black American brethren these days, the sistas too.
These commies are in for a world of hurt.
All Americans united as Americans against commie scum that would try and destroy what our ancestors accomplished.
Black Americans have a huge stake in this game against commie race-baiters. They know it, too. They're not as stupid as you take them to be.
 
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IM2

IM2

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Try again. This time put some thought into it.
I think that's what you might want to do because this thread is about Kings opposition to white racism.
Again. The issues that King was facing were solved by the remedies provided via the incorporation doctrine. This indicates that you are either uneducated and/or ignorant. What else do you have?
Again, I know that and it is not the point of this thread. You apparently have issues understanding this.
 

Disir

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This is not 1958, In fact, there was no right to counsel in the States until Gideon v Wainright 1963.

And these are the changes in the following years:

I mention this because that 1963 case put into motion extremely important cases that continued to challenge the system afterwards.
I think we know this is not 1958. It's not 1963 or 1968 either. This tired refrain from whites needs to stop. It's not 1776 or 1787 either.
Try again. This time put some thought into it.
I think that's what you might want to do because this thread is about Kings opposition to white racism.
Again. The issues that King was facing were solved by the remedies provided via the incorporation doctrine. This indicates that you are either uneducated and/or ignorant. What else do you have?
Again, I know that and it is not the point of this thread. You apparently have issues understanding this.
No. You bit off more than you can chew.
 

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