What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Favorite Works of Sci-Fi

occupied

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Messages
32,487
Reaction score
12,680
Points
1,550
Running out of good ones. I have seriously read just about every book in this thread so far.
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts
I'm not a huge reader of Sci-Fi, but works of Sci-Fi are definitely among my very favorite works of fiction.

My all-time favorite is A Canticle for Leibowitz. Other favorites are The Martian Chronicles, Brave New World, Ender's Game, Frankenstein, Stranger in a Strange Land, Watchers, Starship Troopers, The Foundation Trilogy.

Your favs and suggested reading. . . .

Also, I'm hoping someone can help me with a title of a light Sci-Fi I read more than a decade ago about a couple that dies young, in their forties or so. They are continuously reborn after their deaths, which are separated by just a few years. No matter what precautions they take, they die at the same age over and over again, to the minute, and relive the same number of years, between, approximately, 1930 and 1980. Their lives are lived in the same world, in the same period of history, over and over. Further, after a certain period of intellectual development, they acquire perfect recall of their previous lives, so they are essentially adults, brilliant adults in children's bodies. They are the same person with different families. Because they know what will happen and because they have so much time to learn more and more as psychological adults, they readily secure their financial security early. But they are seemingly alone. The male protagonist resolves to see if there are any others like him, persons reliving the same years over and over again, amassing more and more knowledge.

He runs a continuous ad in several prominent newspapers with a message that would be meaningless to all but someone else like him.

Bottom line: his ad is eventually answered. It's a woman. They get together, fall in love, and share their lives over and over again until discovered by the government via a complex series of events. They get back together each life cycle via the same message, published in the same paper on the same day. Though always reborn in the U.S., their psyches are the only other thing repeated, not their bodes or familial backgrounds.
  1. Michael Crichton - The Andromeda Strain
  2. Ray Bradbury - The Illustrated Man
  3. George Orwell - Animal Farm
  4. Stephen King - The Stand
  5. L. Ron Hubbard - Battlefield Earth
  6. Bram Stoker - Dracula
  7. Mary Shelly - Frankenstein
  8. J.R.R. Tolkein - The Lord Of The Rings
  9. J.K. Rowling - Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone
  10. Richard Adams - Watership Down
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts
  1. Michael Crichton - The Andromeda Strain
  2. Ray Bradbury - The Illustrated Man
  3. George Orwell - Animal Farm
  4. Stephen King - The Stand
  5. L. Ron Hubbard - Battlefield Earth
  6. Bram Stoker - Dracula
  7. Mary Shelly - Frankenstein
  8. J.R.R. Tolkein - The Lord Of The Rings
  9. J.K. Rowling - Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone
  10. Richard Adams - Watership Down
Early on I read scifi....but most of it was pretty depressing to me.
I prefer uplifting books...Watership Down for instance.
I learned how to read even before I started first grade by reading the funny papers.
I used to have quite a comic book collection.
I remember when Spiderman first came out in Marvel Comics.
 

Otis Mayfield

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2021
Messages
4,906
Reaction score
4,760
Points
1,893
Brandon Sanderson writes epic fantasy.

But a lot of modern fantasy is similar to science fiction. There's no elves or goblins, etc. Everything is plausible, like it could happen.

Give his Mistborn series a try.
 
OP
Ringtone

Ringtone

Platinum Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2019
Messages
6,142
Reaction score
3,493
Points
940
Early on I read scifi....but most of it was pretty depressing to me.
I prefer uplifting books...Watership Down for instance.
I learned how to read even before I started first grade by reading the funny papers.
I used to have quite a comic book collection.
I remember when Spiderman first came out in Marvel Comics.
Watership Down is one of my very favorite novels.
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts
About 3 years ago I read all of the Twilight series in a couple of weeks.
The books are decent......the movies sucked ass.
 

skye

Diamond Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
50,243
Reaction score
41,264
Points
3,635
Not a great fan of Sci-Fi here....not my cup of tea.....but...

There are two totally amazing readings ...."Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley, written in 1931.....and "Nineteen Eighty-Four" the 1949 novel by George Orwell.

My two fabs!:thup:
 

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
62,089
Reaction score
19,082
Points
2,250
Location
Duke City
The Hobbit was a children's book but then it turned darker with the trilogy.
HP was the same.
Technically The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings are fantasy-adventure not sci-fi, two completely different genres.
 

occupied

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Messages
32,487
Reaction score
12,680
Points
1,550
The Hobbit was a children's book but then it turned darker with the trilogy.
HP was the same.
Harry Potter is nothing but one lousy contrived deus ex machina after another.
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts

The works of Adam *Shadowchild*:

  • The Jenny Star Pepper in the Great Brass Hand
  • Jenny Starpepper and the Huge White Gibbon
  • Night of the Moths
  • Prison Hawk 441
  • Jenny Starpepper and the Spinning Worm
  • Fluxing Your Anus
  • Venusian Pangenisis
  • Jupiter Praxis
  • The Robot's Mistress

*These are imaginary names of novels from the movie "Paul"
 

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
62,089
Reaction score
19,082
Points
2,250
Location
Duke City
Yes.....I know.
I'm just making sure and sticking with the OP, you'd be surprised how many people don't know the difference between the two genres and call it all sci-fi.
 

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
62,089
Reaction score
19,082
Points
2,250
Location
Duke City
Brandon Sanderson writes epic fantasy.

But a lot of modern fantasy is similar to science fiction. There's no elves or goblins, etc. Everything is plausible, like it could happen.

Give his Mistborn series a try.
That falls under the genre of Science Fantasy.
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts
I'm just making sure and sticking with the OP, you'd be surprised how many people don't know the difference between the two genres and call it all sci-fi.
For that matter Dracula and Frankenstein aren't scifi either.
Scifi is usually a bit dry and some of them are totally negative.
Most of the time scifi doesn't appeal to many.
I read Illustrated man.....and the chapter on Venus and the constant rain was interesting but just a huge downer....as was the ending.
 

Ringel05

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2009
Messages
62,089
Reaction score
19,082
Points
2,250
Location
Duke City
For that matter Dracula and Frankenstein aren't scifi either.
Scifi is usually a bit dry and some of them are totally negative.
Most of the time scifi doesn't appeal to many.
I read Illustrated man.....and the chapter on Venus and the constant rain was interesting but just a huge downer....as was the ending.
Look up the different genres, I believe there's around 35 then each genre has sub categories, Fantasy has 8 or 10. Frankenstein and Dracula are part of the Horror genre.
 

mudwhistle

Diamond Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
113,746
Reaction score
44,857
Points
2,290
Location
Headmaster's Office, Hogwarts
Look up the different genres, I believe there's around 35 then each genre has sub categories, Fantasy has 8 or 10. Frankenstein and Dracula are part of the Horror genre.
Course Frankenstein is listed as one of the greatest novels, and although it is a classic horror novel it is technically about science fiction.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$20.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top