Facts About Judaism

rylah

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Havdalah - Separation of the Holy from Profane,
Shabat from the rest of the Week Days


Don't worry this is not from today... just liked the video.

But anyway, good week to all Beit Yisrael,
and may it be full of blessing and good news!

Shavu'a Tov!


 
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A D'var Torah by Rabbi Sacks on Vayikra and the Coronavirus Pandemic

Here is a short D'var Torah from Rabbi Sacks on what we can learn about the Coronavirus pandemic from this week's parsha of Vayikra. (As an explanation for the opening: we had a few technical issues to begin with, but we got there in the end!)

 

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Zohar On The Torah Portion - Kabbalistic Twist on Vayikra 2020

Baruch Gordon looks into the Kabbalah to discover why the last letter of the first word
of Parshat Vayikra is smaller than the others. (Hint: it has to do with the Land of Israel)

 

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Watch: outcry, fanfare and prayer to stop the plague
in front Temple Mount


Silver trumpets placed in the Temple Institute's exhibit were today taken out on the occasion of the worldwide fast set by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel, for the blowing and praying to stop the Corona epidemic.

Torah scroll was taken out to the street of the city, ashes poured on the heads of the participants. Rabbi Israel Ariel, President of the Institute, led the prayer in front of the Temple.

Before settling in the trumpets, Rabbi Ariel gave words of rebuke linking the plague to the abandonment of the Temple's place. "When the place of the Temple is deserted and isolated, the Capital's Owner also decrees isolation on us" - said Rabbi Ariel Shlita.

Source :Temple Mount News





Comment:
What did Rambam say about the obligation during times of trouble?
And besides, look at it from a different perspective, the place is totally empty now, looks like everything is perfectly prepared...

Well I'm just sayin', but You can always downplay that as the words of a fool.
 
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Jews Around the World Gather Online for Joint Prayer
Shofars and special trumpets were blown during the prayer session, as required by Jewish tradition during a time of crisis.

Jews around the world came together virtually on Wednesday for a joint prayer to end the spread of the novel Coronavirus (Covid-19).

The gathering, led by Israel’s Chief Rabbis David Lau and Yitzchak Yosef, was the largest joint prayer ever held, according to organizers.

“All the Jews in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora will come together and pray to stop this horrific pandemic,” a statement by the organizers read, adding that “each person would take part “separately at home but all the nation will pray united together.”

Rabbi Avi Berman of the Orthodox Union’s Israel branch had called upon all Jews to “gather together emotionally and spiritually.”

Rabbis around the world, including the Chief Rabbis of France, Rome, Beijing, China and Rio de Janeiro participated in the prayer.

Beginning at 4.30 p.m. Israel time and held at the Kotel with only a few participants standing two meters apart from one another, as per the requirements of the Health Ministry, the prayer was broadcast via the video conference platform ZOOM.

Shofars and special trumpets were blown during the prayer session, as required by Jewish tradition during a time of crisis.



Comment: Again just words of a fool...how do You say "Corona" in Hebrew?
Let's make it a fun quiz:

 
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LittleNipper

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You may wish to regard the following: Messianic Life


See...that's exactly what I'm talking about,
missionaries have not the least integrity to be straightforward,
trolling around seeking to disconnect Jews from their heritage, always sneaky.

What is that about Islam and Christianity that makes them so unsure
of themselves that they absolutely must try and turn everyone to be like them?
What heritage are you concerned about? I note that Mary and Joseph were a Jewish couple. Jesus was raised Jewish. He was dedicated at the Temple at Jerusalem... All the prophetic heritage of the Old Testament point to the coming of the Messiah who I firmly believe has come and will return again (likely sooner than later). The Messiah/Christ fulfilled every requirement of the Mosaic/GOD's Law. I note that many Jews are still seeking the Messiah's coming. Yet if indeed He came this day would Jews be anymore receptive than they were 2000 years ago? Would they not expect things to change at His revelation?

I see true Christianity as the pinnacle, or fruition of the history of the nation of Israel, and its part of bringing the SAVIOR to the ENTIRE world (the gentiles) --- and not just so it (Israel) can wallow in exclusive "traditions" for tradition sake... I as an evangelical christian love the Jewish people and their traditions, but I also realize that most of these traditions point to the Messiah. This is something I personally feel many Jews miss. They see them as family gatherings and shinning a spotlight upon themselves. But believers should be shining the light upon HIM who save us an not fret that we will somehow lose traditional identity. This is because we are all made whole when we spotlight G-D's grace to everyone.
 
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Indeependent

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See...that's exactly what I'm talking about,
missionaries have not the least integrity to be straightforward,
trolling around seeking to disconnect Jews from their heritage, always sneaky.

What is that about Islam and Christianity that makes them so unsure
of themselves that they absolutely must try and turn everyone to be like them?
What heritage are you concerned about? I note that Mary and Joseph were a Jewish couple. Jesus was raised Jewish. He was dedicated at the Temple at Jerusalem... All the prophetic heritage of the Old Testament point to the coming of the Messiah who I firmly believe has come and will return again (likely sooner than later). The Messiah/Christ fulfilled every requirement of the Mosaic/GOD's Law. I note that many Jews are still seeking the Messiah's coming. Yet if indeed He came this day would Jews be anymore receptive than they were 2000 years ago? Would they not expect things to change at His revelation?

I see true Christianity as the pinnacle, or fruition of the history of the nation of Israel, and its part of bringing the SAVIOR to the ENTIRE world (the gentiles) --- and not just so it (Israel) can wallow in exclusive "traditions" for tradition sake... I as an evangelical christian love the Jewish people and their traditions, but I also realize that most of these traditions point to the Messiah. This is something I personally feel many Jews miss. They see them as family gatherings and shinning a spotlight upon themselves. But believers should be shining the light upon HIM who save us an not fret that we will somehow lose traditional identity. This is because we are all made whole when we spotlight G-D's grace to everyone.
If the episode of Mary barging her way onto the Temple Mount actually occurred, the Kohanim would have executed her or had her executed by the Romans.
The Kohanim were not known for being shy.
If you actually studied the Torah you would know how preposterous this "episode" sounds.
 

LittleNipper

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See...that's exactly what I'm talking about,
missionaries have not the least integrity to be straightforward,
trolling around seeking to disconnect Jews from their heritage, always sneaky.

What is that about Islam and Christianity that makes them so unsure
of themselves that they absolutely must try and turn everyone to be like them?
What heritage are you concerned about? I note that Mary and Joseph were a Jewish couple. Jesus was raised Jewish. He was dedicated at the Temple at Jerusalem... All the prophetic heritage of the Old Testament point to the coming of the Messiah who I firmly believe has come and will return again (likely sooner than later). The Messiah/Christ fulfilled every requirement of the Mosaic/GOD's Law. I note that many Jews are still seeking the Messiah's coming. Yet if indeed He came this day would Jews be anymore receptive than they were 2000 years ago? Would they not expect things to change at His revelation?

I see true Christianity as the pinnacle, or fruition of the history of the nation of Israel, and its part of bringing the SAVIOR to the ENTIRE world (the gentiles) --- and not just so it (Israel) can wallow in exclusive "traditions" for tradition sake... I as an evangelical christian love the Jewish people and their traditions, but I also realize that most of these traditions point to the Messiah. This is something I personally feel many Jews miss. They see them as family gatherings and shinning a spotlight upon themselves. But believers should be shining the light upon HIM who save us an not fret that we will somehow lose traditional identity. This is because we are all made whole when we spotlight G-D's grace to everyone.
If the episode of Mary barging her way onto the Temple Mount actually occurred, the Kohanim would have executed her or had her executed by the Romans.
The Kohanim were not known for being shy.
If you actually studied the Torah you would know how preposterous this "episode" sounds.
And where exactly does that episode appear in any of the Gospel narratives? I've never read of it. If you are speaking of some Hollywood movie, where have they ever stuck to the Bible without "artistic license". Look at NOAH and also the Ten Commandments. There are problems and I read the Bible and do not depend on even the best that Hollywood has to offer as sticking to the original script.
 
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ding

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Shulchan Aruch For Bnei Noach Set To Be Published

The “Shulchan Aruch” is a halachic rulebook which contains all the daily routines, and also the practices for holidays and the life cycle. What is permitted and what is forbidden? This book will be a collection of halacha specifically for Noahides.

The “Shulchan Aruch” will be written by the Director of Brit Olam – Noahide World Center – Rav Oury Cherki. a result of many years of mutual efforts with many Noahides. It is being written with the advice and guidance of a forum of rabbis who are experts in the subject of Bnei Noach and the universal message of Judaism.


You provided an interesting link. What I liked the most is mentioning of the commandment not to murder in regard with prohibition to embarrass someone in public.
Of course, embarrassment of a fellow is considered murder.

And it's multifaceted, aside from what seems today as apparent moral digression,
as much as with murder today, there's a physiological explanation to why embarrassment is considered murder as well, but it doesn't end there as well.

There's a method to Jewish law, and the Rabbinic argumentation is infinitely complex and meticulous , way beyond what can possibly expanded in such a forum.

Only to start grasping the initial thread of a single debate on a single subject on one page of the Gmara, which can be centered at a single phrase or even word of the law, on its initial literal level- can take at best several months (and I'm being large here), even that is virtually impossible without prior grasp of some minimal basis.

But that's if I'm being large here, in reality, if after 3-4 months You grasp 20% that's a significant intellectual achievement. And a person will know this on his own, once that's starts rolling, the feeling of growing up to a rigorous intellectual challenge, as it's commonly expressed - 'it starts tasting like honey'.

Anyway, as already said this is not the platform capable enough of containing such a detailed discourse in the correct way, and I'm certainly not the one fit to take the position.

But to go back to what You've previously pointed out, I'll conclude with another simple example- there're many kinds of theft, as with murder explained above, some are not as obvious initially, namely - there's whats called 'theft of mind' as well, which I think fits more for the example You've previously given.

Hope I didn't confuse it, or made it overly complicated.
We can always take back, and expand as we proceed with the conversation.
Thanks for your input. Frankly, my knowledge is too low for meaningful conversations, to say nothing about discussions. I tried several times to read the Bible (both OT and NT), but have never managed to get it through completely.

Though, during this period significant shift in my mind happened. I no longer consider Judaism as primitive and purely tribal religion compared with Christianity. The contrary is true, it seems.

I am not a religious person. And I think that never will be. There are some aspects of religious life I can't accept (they are common to all religions). Though, it should be interesting to read the book mentioned when it appears. And follow the rules it provides which get along with my feelings and mind.
I am fascinated. What led you to believe that Judaism is primitive
and tribal?
Primitive? No

Tribal? 100%. That’s understandable until they put the tribe above G-d.
What do you mean by 'tribal'?

By the way, it's G-d who prescribes, with exception of 3 conditions,
that the life of a single member of His tribe takes precedent over His entire Torah.
Cliquish.

it’s the conditions.
 

ding

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Shulchan Aruch For Bnei Noach Set To Be Published

The “Shulchan Aruch” is a halachic rulebook which contains all the daily routines, and also the practices for holidays and the life cycle. What is permitted and what is forbidden? This book will be a collection of halacha specifically for Noahides.

The “Shulchan Aruch” will be written by the Director of Brit Olam – Noahide World Center – Rav Oury Cherki. a result of many years of mutual efforts with many Noahides. It is being written with the advice and guidance of a forum of rabbis who are experts in the subject of Bnei Noach and the universal message of Judaism.


You provided an interesting link. What I liked the most is mentioning of the commandment not to murder in regard with prohibition to embarrass someone in public.
Of course, embarrassment of a fellow is considered murder.

And it's multifaceted, aside from what seems today as apparent moral digression,
as much as with murder today, there's a physiological explanation to why embarrassment is considered murder as well, but it doesn't end there as well.

There's a method to Jewish law, and the Rabbinic argumentation is infinitely complex and meticulous , way beyond what can possibly expanded in such a forum.

Only to start grasping the initial thread of a single debate on a single subject on one page of the Gmara, which can be centered at a single phrase or even word of the law, on its initial literal level- can take at best several months (and I'm being large here), even that is virtually impossible without prior grasp of some minimal basis.

But that's if I'm being large here, in reality, if after 3-4 months You grasp 20% that's a significant intellectual achievement. And a person will know this on his own, once that's starts rolling, the feeling of growing up to a rigorous intellectual challenge, as it's commonly expressed - 'it starts tasting like honey'.

Anyway, as already said this is not the platform capable enough of containing such a detailed discourse in the correct way, and I'm certainly not the one fit to take the position.

But to go back to what You've previously pointed out, I'll conclude with another simple example- there're many kinds of theft, as with murder explained above, some are not as obvious initially, namely - there's whats called 'theft of mind' as well, which I think fits more for the example You've previously given.

Hope I didn't confuse it, or made it overly complicated.
We can always take back, and expand as we proceed with the conversation.
Thanks for your input. Frankly, my knowledge is too low for meaningful conversations, to say nothing about discussions. I tried several times to read the Bible (both OT and NT), but have never managed to get it through completely.

Though, during this period significant shift in my mind happened. I no longer consider Judaism as primitive and purely tribal religion compared with Christianity. The contrary is true, it seems.

I am not a religious person. And I think that never will be. There are some aspects of religious life I can't accept (they are common to all religions). Though, it should be interesting to read the book mentioned when it appears. And follow the rules it provides which get along with my feelings and mind.
I am fascinated. What led you to believe that Judaism is primitive
and tribal?
Primitive? No

Tribal? 100%. That’s understandable until they put the tribe above G-d.
pic------how do you say "tribe" in Hebrew?
Like this. It’s ok to look the other way when a member of the tribe does the wrong thing, the wrong way, for the wrong reason.
 

Indeependent

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See...that's exactly what I'm talking about,
missionaries have not the least integrity to be straightforward,
trolling around seeking to disconnect Jews from their heritage, always sneaky.

What is that about Islam and Christianity that makes them so unsure
of themselves that they absolutely must try and turn everyone to be like them?
What heritage are you concerned about? I note that Mary and Joseph were a Jewish couple. Jesus was raised Jewish. He was dedicated at the Temple at Jerusalem... All the prophetic heritage of the Old Testament point to the coming of the Messiah who I firmly believe has come and will return again (likely sooner than later). The Messiah/Christ fulfilled every requirement of the Mosaic/GOD's Law. I note that many Jews are still seeking the Messiah's coming. Yet if indeed He came this day would Jews be anymore receptive than they were 2000 years ago? Would they not expect things to change at His revelation?

I see true Christianity as the pinnacle, or fruition of the history of the nation of Israel, and its part of bringing the SAVIOR to the ENTIRE world (the gentiles) --- and not just so it (Israel) can wallow in exclusive "traditions" for tradition sake... I as an evangelical christian love the Jewish people and their traditions, but I also realize that most of these traditions point to the Messiah. This is something I personally feel many Jews miss. They see them as family gatherings and shinning a spotlight upon themselves. But believers should be shining the light upon HIM who save us an not fret that we will somehow lose traditional identity. This is because we are all made whole when we spotlight G-D's grace to everyone.
If the episode of Mary barging her way onto the Temple Mount actually occurred, the Kohanim would have executed her or had her executed by the Romans.
The Kohanim were not known for being shy.
If you actually studied the Torah you would know how preposterous this "episode" sounds.
And where exactly does that episode appear in any of the Gospel narratives? I've never read of it. If you are speaking of some Hollywood movie, where have they ever stuck to the Bible without "artistic license". Look at NOAH and also the Ten Commandments. There are problems and I read the Bible and do not depend on even the best that Hollywood has to offer as sticking to the original script.
Luke?
The fact is that you have not read the NT at all if you don’t even know about this episode.
 

ESay

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Shulchan Aruch For Bnei Noach Set To Be Published

The “Shulchan Aruch” is a halachic rulebook which contains all the daily routines, and also the practices for holidays and the life cycle. What is permitted and what is forbidden? This book will be a collection of halacha specifically for Noahides.

The “Shulchan Aruch” will be written by the Director of Brit Olam – Noahide World Center – Rav Oury Cherki. a result of many years of mutual efforts with many Noahides. It is being written with the advice and guidance of a forum of rabbis who are experts in the subject of Bnei Noach and the universal message of Judaism.


You provided an interesting link. What I liked the most is mentioning of the commandment not to murder in regard with prohibition to embarrass someone in public.
Of course, embarrassment of a fellow is considered murder.

And it's multifaceted, aside from what seems today as apparent moral digression,
as much as with murder today, there's a physiological explanation to why embarrassment is considered murder as well, but it doesn't end there as well.

There's a method to Jewish law, and the Rabbinic argumentation is infinitely complex and meticulous , way beyond what can possibly expanded in such a forum.

Only to start grasping the initial thread of a single debate on a single subject on one page of the Gmara, which can be centered at a single phrase or even word of the law, on its initial literal level- can take at best several months (and I'm being large here), even that is virtually impossible without prior grasp of some minimal basis.

But that's if I'm being large here, in reality, if after 3-4 months You grasp 20% that's a significant intellectual achievement. And a person will know this on his own, once that's starts rolling, the feeling of growing up to a rigorous intellectual challenge, as it's commonly expressed - 'it starts tasting like honey'.

Anyway, as already said this is not the platform capable enough of containing such a detailed discourse in the correct way, and I'm certainly not the one fit to take the position.

But to go back to what You've previously pointed out, I'll conclude with another simple example- there're many kinds of theft, as with murder explained above, some are not as obvious initially, namely - there's whats called 'theft of mind' as well, which I think fits more for the example You've previously given.

Hope I didn't confuse it, or made it overly complicated.
We can always take back, and expand as we proceed with the conversation.
Thanks for your input. Frankly, my knowledge is too low for meaningful conversations, to say nothing about discussions. I tried several times to read the Bible (both OT and NT), but have never managed to get it through completely.

Though, during this period significant shift in my mind happened. I no longer consider Judaism as primitive and purely tribal religion compared with Christianity. The contrary is true, it seems.

I am not a religious person. And I think that never will be. There are some aspects of religious life I can't accept (they are common to all religions). Though, it should be interesting to read the book mentioned when it appears. And follow the rules it provides which get along with my feelings and mind.
Thank You, that's inspiring, and frankly I'm surprised.
So far this is one of the most meaningful conversations I've had on the board.

First of all, before approaching to read Torah, so as to grasp its meaning,
one has to take in account what it is and who it was aimed at. Namely, the 'word of G-d'.
And as with any communication it is aimed at specific people at a point in time in their language.

This is not to say the communication is aimed only to them, but naturally, as when listening to an exchange from a distance, to have a chance at understanding what's actually being said, at the least from merely linguistic sense, it is essential to take in mind who are the directly involved parties and in what situation - this is no less true for native Hebrew speaking Jews.

Otherwise, if approached as merely a story-line , relatively meaningless, a;most impossible to make sense of most details, and frankly a quiet boring read.

That's exactly why at least one commentary is added to the curriculum, most commonly Rashi, even in secular schools in Israel - specifically to help it bridge the vast generational gap.

And this is before we even discuss bridging of the linguistic gap, with all the challenges that go along with translation.

However, one thing can address these issues holistically, vastly improve the experience and make it alive, and this is a key I think largely overlooked - RHYTHM.

You see, Torah is living in the Jewish community not merely as a sealed book, that one is required to read from cover to cover, rather there's what's called 'The Weekly Torah Portion'.
Jews study a specific portion of the 5 books of Moses, a specific portion for a week, little by little, or in one take when gathering on Shabat, while also discussing it or typically hearing a speech about that specific portion that goes into the depth of the details, maybe something from the wealth of questions, arguments, parables and answers revealed and argued by the Sages through the generations, or can be something that captures the parallels of current events. This way it is very much alive and relevant, around which revolves the entire week, very much like the theme of the week, one which You can soak and mingle, take time to think about and experience in a very direct and meaningful manner.

Another aspect. and I'll finish with that, which is more intimate, is You should realize the study is usually not done alone, rather in front of a living person, a learned Rabbi (and groups) with whom You can directly interact, ask questions, challenge and argue (Judaism as a culture is mainly an interaction that largely revolves around the art of questioning), which leads me to what I think can be probably the best advice I can give - if You're interested and up to the challenge, simply express that desire to learn (not to be converted, because You'll be automatically rejected), and look for a Rabbi who is open for that interaction and fits Your personality, don't be shy to be assertive, and You'll know exactly when the correct person appears.

My first suggestion would be Rabbi Tovia Singer, though his work mainly revolves around the goal of getting Jews out of the church and inter-faith debates for that purpose, he's very knowledgeable and open, as well as available to wide audience through various channels,
At the least, intellectually I think You'll find him interesting, and if needed, most probably will be able to direct You to other people -

I have one more question to you. Let's imagine a situation. There is some person living say in South America who has never heard about the Torah, Noahide laws etc. He worships his local gods, using their images and statues as objects of worship.

As a whole, he is a good person - doesn't kill anyone, hardworking, kind, ready to help his fellows in difficult situations.

What his fate will be after his death?
 

Indeependent

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Shulchan Aruch For Bnei Noach Set To Be Published

The “Shulchan Aruch” is a halachic rulebook which contains all the daily routines, and also the practices for holidays and the life cycle. What is permitted and what is forbidden? This book will be a collection of halacha specifically for Noahides.

The “Shulchan Aruch” will be written by the Director of Brit Olam – Noahide World Center – Rav Oury Cherki. a result of many years of mutual efforts with many Noahides. It is being written with the advice and guidance of a forum of rabbis who are experts in the subject of Bnei Noach and the universal message of Judaism.


You provided an interesting link. What I liked the most is mentioning of the commandment not to murder in regard with prohibition to embarrass someone in public.
Of course, embarrassment of a fellow is considered murder.

And it's multifaceted, aside from what seems today as apparent moral digression,
as much as with murder today, there's a physiological explanation to why embarrassment is considered murder as well, but it doesn't end there as well.

There's a method to Jewish law, and the Rabbinic argumentation is infinitely complex and meticulous , way beyond what can possibly expanded in such a forum.

Only to start grasping the initial thread of a single debate on a single subject on one page of the Gmara, which can be centered at a single phrase or even word of the law, on its initial literal level- can take at best several months (and I'm being large here), even that is virtually impossible without prior grasp of some minimal basis.

But that's if I'm being large here, in reality, if after 3-4 months You grasp 20% that's a significant intellectual achievement. And a person will know this on his own, once that's starts rolling, the feeling of growing up to a rigorous intellectual challenge, as it's commonly expressed - 'it starts tasting like honey'.

Anyway, as already said this is not the platform capable enough of containing such a detailed discourse in the correct way, and I'm certainly not the one fit to take the position.

But to go back to what You've previously pointed out, I'll conclude with another simple example- there're many kinds of theft, as with murder explained above, some are not as obvious initially, namely - there's whats called 'theft of mind' as well, which I think fits more for the example You've previously given.

Hope I didn't confuse it, or made it overly complicated.
We can always take back, and expand as we proceed with the conversation.
Thanks for your input. Frankly, my knowledge is too low for meaningful conversations, to say nothing about discussions. I tried several times to read the Bible (both OT and NT), but have never managed to get it through completely.

Though, during this period significant shift in my mind happened. I no longer consider Judaism as primitive and purely tribal religion compared with Christianity. The contrary is true, it seems.

I am not a religious person. And I think that never will be. There are some aspects of religious life I can't accept (they are common to all religions). Though, it should be interesting to read the book mentioned when it appears. And follow the rules it provides which get along with my feelings and mind.
Thank You, that's inspiring, and frankly I'm surprised.
So far this is one of the most meaningful conversations I've had on the board.

First of all, before approaching to read Torah, so as to grasp its meaning,
one has to take in account what it is and who it was aimed at. Namely, the 'word of G-d'.
And as with any communication it is aimed at specific people at a point in time in their language.

This is not to say the communication is aimed only to them, but naturally, as when listening to an exchange from a distance, to have a chance at understanding what's actually being said, at the least from merely linguistic sense, it is essential to take in mind who are the directly involved parties and in what situation - this is no less true for native Hebrew speaking Jews.

Otherwise, if approached as merely a story-line , relatively meaningless, a;most impossible to make sense of most details, and frankly a quiet boring read.

That's exactly why at least one commentary is added to the curriculum, most commonly Rashi, even in secular schools in Israel - specifically to help it bridge the vast generational gap.

And this is before we even discuss bridging of the linguistic gap, with all the challenges that go along with translation.

However, one thing can address these issues holistically, vastly improve the experience and make it alive, and this is a key I think largely overlooked - RHYTHM.

You see, Torah is living in the Jewish community not merely as a sealed book, that one is required to read from cover to cover, rather there's what's called 'The Weekly Torah Portion'.
Jews study a specific portion of the 5 books of Moses, a specific portion for a week, little by little, or in one take when gathering on Shabat, while also discussing it or typically hearing a speech about that specific portion that goes into the depth of the details, maybe something from the wealth of questions, arguments, parables and answers revealed and argued by the Sages through the generations, or can be something that captures the parallels of current events. This way it is very much alive and relevant, around which revolves the entire week, very much like the theme of the week, one which You can soak and mingle, take time to think about and experience in a very direct and meaningful manner.

Another aspect. and I'll finish with that, which is more intimate, is You should realize the study is usually not done alone, rather in front of a living person, a learned Rabbi (and groups) with whom You can directly interact, ask questions, challenge and argue (Judaism as a culture is mainly an interaction that largely revolves around the art of questioning), which leads me to what I think can be probably the best advice I can give - if You're interested and up to the challenge, simply express that desire to learn (not to be converted, because You'll be automatically rejected), and look for a Rabbi who is open for that interaction and fits Your personality, don't be shy to be assertive, and You'll know exactly when the correct person appears.

My first suggestion would be Rabbi Tovia Singer, though his work mainly revolves around the goal of getting Jews out of the church and inter-faith debates for that purpose, he's very knowledgeable and open, as well as available to wide audience through various channels,
At the least, intellectually I think You'll find him interesting, and if needed, most probably will be able to direct You to other people -

I have one more question to you. Let's imagine a situation. There is some person living say in South America who has never heard about the Torah, Noahide laws etc. He worships his local gods, using their images and statues as objects of worship.

As a whole, he is a good person - doesn't kill anyone, hardworking, kind, ready to help his fellows in difficult situations.

What his fate will be after his death?
Very pleasant.
 

luchitociencia

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“All the Jews in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora will come together and pray to stop this horrific pandemic,” a statement by the organizers read, adding that “each person would take part “separately at home but all the nation will pray united together.”
And the prayer didn't work because God is not listening to them.
 

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Shulchan Aruch For Bnei Noach Set To Be Published

The “Shulchan Aruch” is a halachic rulebook which contains all the daily routines, and also the practices for holidays and the life cycle. What is permitted and what is forbidden? This book will be a collection of halacha specifically for Noahides.

The “Shulchan Aruch” will be written by the Director of Brit Olam – Noahide World Center – Rav Oury Cherki. a result of many years of mutual efforts with many Noahides. It is being written with the advice and guidance of a forum of rabbis who are experts in the subject of Bnei Noach and the universal message of Judaism.


You provided an interesting link. What I liked the most is mentioning of the commandment not to murder in regard with prohibition to embarrass someone in public.
Of course, embarrassment of a fellow is considered murder.

And it's multifaceted, aside from what seems today as apparent moral digression,
as much as with murder today, there's a physiological explanation to why embarrassment is considered murder as well, but it doesn't end there as well.

There's a method to Jewish law, and the Rabbinic argumentation is infinitely complex and meticulous , way beyond what can possibly expanded in such a forum.

Only to start grasping the initial thread of a single debate on a single subject on one page of the Gmara, which can be centered at a single phrase or even word of the law, on its initial literal level- can take at best several months (and I'm being large here), even that is virtually impossible without prior grasp of some minimal basis.

But that's if I'm being large here, in reality, if after 3-4 months You grasp 20% that's a significant intellectual achievement. And a person will know this on his own, once that's starts rolling, the feeling of growing up to a rigorous intellectual challenge, as it's commonly expressed - 'it starts tasting like honey'.

Anyway, as already said this is not the platform capable enough of containing such a detailed discourse in the correct way, and I'm certainly not the one fit to take the position.

But to go back to what You've previously pointed out, I'll conclude with another simple example- there're many kinds of theft, as with murder explained above, some are not as obvious initially, namely - there's whats called 'theft of mind' as well, which I think fits more for the example You've previously given.

Hope I didn't confuse it, or made it overly complicated.
We can always take back, and expand as we proceed with the conversation.
Thanks for your input. Frankly, my knowledge is too low for meaningful conversations, to say nothing about discussions. I tried several times to read the Bible (both OT and NT), but have never managed to get it through completely.

Though, during this period significant shift in my mind happened. I no longer consider Judaism as primitive and purely tribal religion compared with Christianity. The contrary is true, it seems.

I am not a religious person. And I think that never will be. There are some aspects of religious life I can't accept (they are common to all religions). Though, it should be interesting to read the book mentioned when it appears. And follow the rules it provides which get along with my feelings and mind.
I am fascinated. What led you to believe that Judaism is primitive
and tribal?
Primitive? No

Tribal? 100%. That’s understandable until they put the tribe above G-d.
pic------how do you say "tribe" in Hebrew?
Like this. It’s ok to look the other way when a member of the tribe does the wrong thing, the wrong way, for the wrong reason.
Who or what decides what is wrong?
 

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“All the Jews in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora will come together and pray to stop this horrific pandemic,” a statement by the organizers read, adding that “each person would take part “separately at home but all the nation will pray united together.”
And the prayer didn't work because God is not listening to them.
How do you know he isn't?
 

luchitociencia

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How do you know he isn't?
The virus still is around. and some people still dying.

With prayers or without prayers at one point this virus will be contained.

The whole show including silver trumpets is just good will "to do something" like giving hope that God will take care, but this virus was triggered by human actions and will be contained by human actions.

It won't be a miracle.
 

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How do you know he isn't?
The virus still is around. and some people still dying.

With prayers or without prayers at one point this virus will be contained.

The whole show including silver trumpets is just good will "to do something" like giving hope that God will take care, but this virus was triggered by human actions and will be contained by human actions.

It won't be a miracle.
There has been a paradigm shift to this pandemic.

Some people have found meaning to their lives. A spiritual discovery.

A gift from G-d?
 

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