Every year, they ride

BDBoop

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Don't harsh my zen, Jen!
ST. PAUL, Minn, Dec 25 (Reuters) - The day after Christmas will be somber for Dakota Indians marking what they consider a travesty of justice 150 years ago, when 38 of their ancestors were executed in the biggest mass hanging in U.S. history.

Overshadowed by the Civil War raging in the East, the hangings in Mankato, Minnesota, on Dec. 26, 1862, followed the often overlooked six-week U.S.-Dakota war earlier that year -- a war that marked the start of three decades of fighting between Native Americans and the U.S. government across the Plains.

President Abraham Lincoln intervened in the case, demanding a review that reduced the number of death sentences. But he allowed 38 to be executed, including two men historians believe were hanged in error, even as he was preparing the Emancipation Proclamation to free black slaves in the South.

This month, in an annual event that started in 2005, some Dakota are making a 300-mile trek on horseback in frigid winter temperatures to revive the memory of this footnote in U.S. history.
Great article. It is from last year - but they ride every year, and the story of course remains the same.

Dakota Indians Mark 1862 Hangings With 300-Mile Horseback Ride
 

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JakeStarkey

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Neo-conservative military extravangazas were wrong in 1862 as they have been since March 2003.
 

Mr Clean

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The Indians got fucked.

What they should have done was chop the heads off the Pilgrim assholes and stuck them on stakes in the sand as warning to anymore of those European assholes who thought they could come over here and take over.
 
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BDBoop

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They did.

This story struck a chord with me, the ones who escaped to SD but know that their roots are in Minnesota.
 

koshergrl

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Er..150 years ago, Pilgrims were not involved.

And when Pilgrims were involved, it wasn't with Dakotas.

And this was a war, regardless of whether or not people like to acknowledge that fact.

The Sioux started attacking settlers, which compelled the Army to take action.

"
On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although in Abraham Lincoln's second annual address, he noted that not less than 800 men, women, and children had died.
Over the next several months, continued battles pitting the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands.[4] By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history."

They hung 38, but they arrested many, many more...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862
 
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Flopper

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During the 19th century, it's estimated that the Indian population decreased from 600,000 to 237,000.
 
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BDBoop

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That's horrific, but still not, in my estimation, as horrific as how survivors were and are treated.
 

koshergrl

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That's horrific, but still not, in my estimation, as horrific as how survivors were and are treated.

I agree.

"
Those men and women [2] who were not adopted, as well as teenage boys,[3] could also face the alternative fate of death by torture. The torture had strong sacrificial overtones, usually to the sun.[4] Captives were expected to show extreme self-control and composure during torture, singing "death songs", bragging of one's courage or deeds in battle, and otherwise showing defiance.[5] The torture was conducted publicly in the captors' village, and the entire population (including children) watched and participated.[6] Common torture techniques included burning the captive- which was done one hot coal at a time, rather than the Hollywood-style pile of firewood around the captive - cuts from knives, beatings with switches and jabs from sharp sticks. Prisoners' fingernails were ripped out. Their fingers were broken, then twisted and yanked by children. Captives were made to eat pieces of their own flesh, and were scalped alive. To make the torture last longer, the Native Americans would revive captives with rest periods during which time they were given food and water. Tortures would begin with the lower limbs, then gradually spread to the arms, then the torso. The Native Americans spoke of "caressing" the prisoners gently at first, which meant that the initial tortures were designed to cause pain, but only minimal bodily harm. By these means, the execution of a captive, especially an adult male, could take several days and nights.[7]"

Captives in American Indian Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Pogo

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Hilaria Contraria ambles in armed with Wiki to broad brush the Lakota into the entire race of "Indians" making no discrimination ("they all look alike to me") -- based on all-white reference books from the time while extermination was still going on (first reference: 1907; second: 1632...)

Can't make this stuff up. I bet she wrote scripts for F Troop.
 
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Pogo

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And on Christmas Eve of all daze. She's a lock for the Jeffrey Amherst award.
 

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