What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Dramatic Taliban hostage rescue earns Navy SEAL the Medal of Honor

R

rdean

Guest
WASHINGTON — President Obama will present the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL for his role in a dramatic nighttime raid of a Taliban compound that led to the rescue of an American doctor in Afghanistan in 2012, USA TODAY has learned.

Byers’ actions were so clearly beyond expectation, even for a Navy SEAL, that the Navy had no hesitation in nominating him for the Medal of Honor, according to a Defense official familiar with his case but not authorized to speak publicly about it.

Dramatic Taliban hostage rescue earns Navy SEAL the Medal of Honor

----------------------------

American exceptionalism, it's our military.
 

Ame®icano

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
21,692
Reaction score
4,491
Points
280
Location
Michigan

bear513

Diamond Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2012
Messages
65,242
Reaction score
12,988
Points
2,180
WASHINGTON — President Obama will present the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL for his role in a dramatic nighttime raid of a Taliban compound that led to the rescue of an American doctor in Afghanistan in 2012, USA TODAY has learned.

Byers’ actions were so clearly beyond expectation, even for a Navy SEAL, that the Navy had no hesitation in nominating him for the Medal of Honor, according to a Defense official familiar with his case but not authorized to speak publicly about it.

Dramatic Taliban hostage rescue earns Navy SEAL the Medal of Honor

----------------------------

American exceptionalism, it's our military.


Damn Rderp didn't fuck up a good OP with his usual partisan hack attacks?????

Quick some one dial 911 Rderp is dying
 

Harry Dresden

Adamantium Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
76,428
Reaction score
14,272
Points
2,210
Location
Nv.
WASHINGTON — President Obama will present the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL for his role in a dramatic nighttime raid of a Taliban compound that led to the rescue of an American doctor in Afghanistan in 2012, USA TODAY has learned.

Byers’ actions were so clearly beyond expectation, even for a Navy SEAL, that the Navy had no hesitation in nominating him for the Medal of Honor, according to a Defense official familiar with his case but not authorized to speak publicly about it.

Dramatic Taliban hostage rescue earns Navy SEAL the Medal of Honor

----------------------------

American exceptionalism, it's our military.


Damn Rderp didn't fuck up a good OP with his usual partisan hack attacks?????

Quick some one dial 911 Rderp is dying
yea i was surprised too.....did not even mention the republicans....
 

Luddly Neddite

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2011
Messages
63,820
Reaction score
9,877
Points
2,040
Cool!

Anyone else notice that under Obama more CMH's have been given out than under Jr.?

Obviously, they'll hand out The Medal of Honor for anything, nowadays.


Lemme guess ..... I'll bet you're a big fan of the fake "patriots" stealing public and private property in Oregon. And, betcha you're too fat and lazy to fight for your country and I'm sure you just adore the Clown Car Repub draft dodgers running for prez.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Claudette

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Messages
42,532
Reaction score
13,288
Points
2,250
WASHINGTON — President Obama will present the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL for his role in a dramatic nighttime raid of a Taliban compound that led to the rescue of an American doctor in Afghanistan in 2012, USA TODAY has learned.

Byers’ actions were so clearly beyond expectation, even for a Navy SEAL, that the Navy had no hesitation in nominating him for the Medal of Honor, according to a Defense official familiar with his case but not authorized to speak publicly about it.

Dramatic Taliban hostage rescue earns Navy SEAL the Medal of Honor

----------------------------

American exceptionalism, it's our military.

Glad to hear it. These SEALs don't get half enough credit for what they do.

Same goes for all the Spec Ops guys. Glad this one will bet the CMH.
 

Camp

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2013
Messages
28,620
Reaction score
7,830
Points
280
Cool!

Anyone else notice that under Obama more CMH's have been given out than under Jr.?
Why yes. Yes I have.

You guys really like to bullshit each other and suck it up to Barry.

According to records, you both are imagining things. Fucking losers.

Afghanistan 2001-Present
Iraq 2003-2011
You should always check Wikipedia when you use it as a source for acting like you know stuff and proceed to insult and name call. Somebody might check and expose you as being dope. Wikipedia's list is incomplete, making the OP correct. Perhaps he used a more reliable source. Try this one, it seems to be more connected to the situations and topic.

defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/MOH-Special
 

Ame®icano

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
21,692
Reaction score
4,491
Points
280
Location
Michigan
Cool!

Anyone else notice that under Obama more CMH's have been given out than under Jr.?
Why yes. Yes I have.

You guys really like to bullshit each other and suck it up to Barry.

According to records, you both are imagining things. Fucking losers.

Afghanistan 2001-Present
Iraq 2003-2011
You should always check Wikipedia when you use it as a source for acting like you know stuff and proceed to insult and name call. Somebody might check and expose you as being dope. Wikipedia's list is incomplete, making the OP correct. Perhaps he used a more reliable source. Try this one, it seems to be more connected to the situations and topic.

defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/MOH-Special

Really?

Your link shows 17 CMH recipients, and my links show how many?
My two link shows the same 17, and somehow, it's incomplete.

There is a difference in between links, because wiki show when they received the CMH, to give you idea who was the president at the time.

But no, you couldn't resist to shitpost for no reason and that makes you another fucking loser.
 

Camp

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2013
Messages
28,620
Reaction score
7,830
Points
280
Cool!

Anyone else notice that under Obama more CMH's have been given out than under Jr.?
Why yes. Yes I have.

You guys really like to bullshit each other and suck it up to Barry.

According to records, you both are imagining things. Fucking losers.

Afghanistan 2001-Present
Iraq 2003-2011
You should always check Wikipedia when you use it as a source for acting like you know stuff and proceed to insult and name call. Somebody might check and expose you as being dope. Wikipedia's list is incomplete, making the OP correct. Perhaps he used a more reliable source. Try this one, it seems to be more connected to the situations and topic.

defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/MOH-Special

Really?

Your link shows 17 CMH recipients, and my links show how many?
My two link shows the same 17, and somehow, it's incomplete.

There is a difference in between links, because wiki show when they received the CMH, to give you idea who was the president at the time.

But no, you couldn't resist to shitpost for no reason and that makes you another fucking loser.
Does your Wikipedia source give the date of the award or the date of action? If it does not give the date of the award being presented it is incomplete. But you admit to knowing that. The link I provided will give both dates if you click on the name of the recipient or his photo.
 

waltky

Wise ol' monkey
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
26,211
Reaction score
2,584
Points
275
Location
Okolona, KY
Rescues without the proper equipment...

Navy SEAL Details Harrowing Mission to Rescue Hostage in Afghanistan
Feb 27, 2016 | Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator Edward Byers is just looking forward to getting back to work.
On Monday, the 36-year-old SEAL will receive the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award, for his role in the daring 2012 hostage rescue of an American aid worker, Dr. Dilip Joseph, in Afghanistan. But don't expect him to rest on those laurels. In a Feb. 25 interview with Military.com, Byers said he has no intention of drawing his 17-year military career to a close, and may choose to stay on in the special warfare community even after he reaches the 20-year retirement threshold in 2018. "As long as I continue to enjoy my job, I'm going to continue doing it," he said. "I love my job now; it's the greatest job in the world." Byers spoke publicly this month for the first time about the events that earned him the Medal of Honor. Until recently, even the language on his award citation had been withheld from public release.

A member of the Navy's elite SEAL Team Six, Byers was about two months into a deployment to eastern Afghanistan when his team received their rescue mission. Joseph, the medical director of the nonprofit organization Morning Star Development, had been kidnapped along with his driver and Afghan interpreter by Taliban-affiliated forces Dec. 5, 2012. On Dec. 8, Byers' team was sent to a remote compound in the Qarghah'i district of Laghman province, where intelligence showed Joseph was being held. The team reached the building late at night, after a four-hour march to the mountainous location on primitive footpaths.

Going into the mission, Byers and his teammates knew the stakes were high. "Success of the rescue operation relied upon surprise, speed, and aggressive action," Byers' summary of action states. "Trading personal security for speed of action was inherent to the success of this rescue mission. Each assaulter in the rescue force volunteered for this operation with full appreciation for the risks they were to undertake." As the team got within 25 meters of the compound, a sentry at the door was alerted to their presence. The first member of the team, Petty Officer First Class Nicolas Checque, shot at the guard and ran towards the door of the compound. He fell wounded by an AK-47 round to the head as he charged into the building.

Byers was the second man inside the building, sprinting in on Checque's heels. "There were some blankets hanging up; it wasn't like a typical door, so you couldn't just open the door and walk in," Byers recalled. "When I finally [made my way through the blankets], down my area of responsibility there was an enemy that I engaged with and then I saw another person that was moving across the floor. I didn't know whether or not that person was [the hostage] or if it was just an enemy coming to and trying to get some weapons, so by the time I got to him, I was able to get on top of him, straddle him, pin him down with my legs."

Locked in hand-to-hand combat with the unknown man underneath him, Byers managed to subdue him with one hand and use the other to adjust the focus of his night-vision goggles. Having done so, he saw that the man was one of the captors and engaged him with his weapon. "At the same time, we're calling out, trying to find the location of the American hostage," Byers said. Joseph called out, alerting the SEALs to his presence, three to five feet away from where Byers had grappled with the guard. Byers immediately tackled the captive American, using his own body and body armor to shield him from the fighting. From this position, Byers noticed another man close by. "It ended up being an enemy who had grenades and a weapon on him within arms' reach," Byers said. "And I was able to pin him to the wall by his throat until our team was able to come in and take care of that threat." The entire raid was over in a matter of minutes.

MORE

See also:

Lacking Basic Gear, Special Operators Stuck Buying Their Own Equipment
Feb 26, 2016 | WASHINGTON -- Sean Matson, who recently left active duty as a Navy SEAL, said the military measured his head four times -- each time before deployment -- with plans to provide him a more advanced ballistic helmet.
But the new helmet never materialized. During a deployment in Africa, Matson and six of his fellow SEALs each shelled out about $900 for updated helmets that held the lights, communications devices and batteries needed for their missions. "There was never a clear solution to it, so guys were going out spending $800-$900 on their own ballistic helmet," said Matson, who is now CEO of the military supply company Matbock. Elite troops such as the SEALs are more and more forced to dip into their own pockets to purchase basic military gear such as helmets, global positioning devices and medical supplies, according to Matson and others involved in the military's unofficial civilian-side supply network who came to Capitol Hill on Thursday.

special-operator-600.jpg

A U.S. Special Operations Forces member prepares his gear for an evening mission in western Iraq.​

House lawmakers have taken notice and said they will request an explanation from Defense Secretary Ash Carter. "These are the guys we assume have the best gear all the time," said Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-California, a Marine Corps combat veteran. Hunter said special operations troops have been approaching him in his California district complaining about the inability to get needed materials and he has been investigating the issue. Numerous individual instances point to a systemic problem in the military's supply chain, but a blind spot exists between Defense Department vendors and the troops who need the gear and supplies, Hunter said. "It's been impossible for me to find out how the money is getting stopped and why it is not going down to where it's supposed to be," he said.

Aaron Negherbon is the executive director of the nonprofit group Troops Direct, which ships needed and requested supplies -- from boot laces to tablet devices -- to service members who cannot get it through their commands. Less than two days after the attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya, Negherbon said he was contacted by the commander of a Marine Corps Fleet Anti-Terrorism Security Team that was being deployed there. The commander told him the team lacked a variety of crucial equipment, including sniper supplies, he said. "They came to us for ... batteries because they didn't have any of those. ... It is kind of like, 'What the heck is going on?' " Negherbon said. He said troops often have to buy their own medical equipment such as tourniquets, and shell out about $1,000 each for their own helmets or $500 for a GPS device that they need for duty during a deployment. "The question is, why can't you get this?" Negherbon said.

MORE
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$505.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top