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China deploys a new weapon against India: Racism

Vikrant

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff
 

frigidweirdo

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.
 
OP
Vikrant

Vikrant

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.
 

Two Thumbs

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the Chinese government seeks to rule everything.

any small country that can't defend itself is under threat, but india can stand alone, it's got the population and resources, so china wants to bait them into doing something that would turn the world against them.

china is very patient, they know they can win.
 

frigidweirdo

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.
 
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Vikrant

Vikrant

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.
 

frigidweirdo

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.
 

anotherlife

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

Why doesn't China invade Siberia instead? Half of Siberia is already Chinese anyways.
 

anotherlife

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

As per the British Encyclopedia, a White Man is of worth minimum 3 Indians and 11 Negros. But how many Chinese?
 

frigidweirdo

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Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

Why doesn't China invade Siberia instead? Half of Siberia is already Chinese anyways.

Are you seriously asking me this question?
 

anotherlife

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The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

Why doesn't China invade Siberia instead? Half of Siberia is already Chinese anyways.

Are you seriously asking me this question?

No, not really, only the question wanted me to ask it.
 
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Vikrant

Vikrant

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It seems like India has shaken China by its core. Because of that, Chinese are engaging in some serious bigotry against Indians.

---

...

Up until now, Chinese media organisations have limited themselves to accusing India and its military and political leaders of lying, duplicity, deceit and being the prime movers behind the high-stakes standoff that has thrown into question New Delhi and Beijing's relationship.

Now, however, Chinese media has gone a step further, unabashedly mocking India in a Twitter video that has undertones of racism in the way it chooses to depict an Indian.


Released by Xinhua News Agency, the official Chinese press agency, the video purports to explain the "seven sins" that India has committed while "illegally trespassing" into Doklam and comes a day after Indian and Chinese troops had a brief, ill-tempered altercation in Ladakh.

The video features a woman who, speaking in English, explains New Delhi's seven supposed sins. The video occasionally cuts to what we are to assume is a character representing India.

In a seeming attempt to make it clear that the actor is impersonating India, the character is seen sporting a turban, an unconvincing faux beard and an even more unconvincing 'Indian' accent.

...

Chinese media mocks India with racist video on Doklam standoff

Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

All right. It is time to expand our conversation on Chinese culture and its implication on peace and security of countries that adjoin China. I have always attempted to explain Chinese behavior towards its neighbors through the lens of CPC. I have to admit though that understanding CPC was not enough in explaining blatant Chinese aggression towards its neighbors especially those neighbors that were not in a position to put up a fight against China.

Recently, I have been taking interest in ancient history of China along with evolution of Chinese idioms. There is an ancient Chinese idiom that goes something like this Treasuring a Jade Pendant. The origin of this idiom lies in an ancient folk lore, a tale of a poor peasant who found a Jade pendant. The poor peasant was killed and his precious Jade pendant was taken away from him by a robber. The robber who took the Jade pendant was also killed by someone else for the Jade pendant. This vicious wave continued till the Jade pendant ended up in the hands of someone who was strong enough to wear the Jade pendant openly and defend it. So in the minds of Chinese leaders Tibetans did not deserve to hold on to Tibet because they could not defend it.

Unless Chinese are convinced that India can defend the Jade pendant, Chinese will continue to push the envelope. I think India's latest move of deploying A5 nuclear missiles against China along with massive deployment of men and equipment on Indo-Tibet border is India's way of letting China know that India will defend the Jade pendant.
 

frigidweirdo

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Hardly surprising, the Chinese will say anything to get their own way. They are kind of racist anyway.

However this is all over a piece of land where nobody lives and isn't worth anything. This is about China dominating others.

I read an article in a Chinese newspaper the other day about Taiwan. Essentially saying that most Taiwanese don't want to go back to being part of China, but the Chinese want it to happen and that's clearly the most important thing, so fuck Taiwan, we have weapons.

The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

All right. It is time to expand our conversation on Chinese culture and its implication on peace and security of countries that adjoin China. I have always attempted to explain Chinese behavior towards its neighbors through the lens of CPC. I have to admit though that understanding CPC was not enough in explaining blatant Chinese aggression towards its neighbors especially those neighbors that were not in a position to put up a fight against China.

Recently, I have been taking interest in ancient history of China along with evolution of Chinese idioms. There is an ancient Chinese idiom that goes something like this Treasuring a Jade Pendant. The origin of this idiom lies in an ancient folk lore, a tale of a poor peasant who found a Jade pendant. The poor peasant was killed and his precious Jade pendant was taken away from him by a robber. The robber who took the Jade pendant was also killed by someone else for the Jade pendant. This vicious wave continued till the Jade pendant ended up in the hands of someone who was strong enough to wear the Jade pendant openly and defend it. So in the minds of Chinese leaders Tibetans did not deserve to hold on to Tibet because they could not defend it.

Unless Chinese are convinced that India can defend the Jade pendant, Chinese will continue to push the envelope. I think India's latest move of deploying A5 nuclear missiles against China along with massive deployment of men and equipment on Indo-Tibet border is India's way of letting China know that India will defend the Jade pendant.

It's interesting, and possibly this sort of logic is what pushes the Chinese.

Looking to Taiwan, as I said, you have the article I read in Monday's edition of the Global Times, one of these govt hack newspapers. The article is "Timetable needed for unification of Taiwan" written by a Zhou Zhihuai.

"Even if the Taiwanese public wants to maintain the status quo, public opinion in the mainland requires national reunification. As far back as the 1980s, former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping raised the question: Are we going to give up reunification if Taiwan authorities refuse to negotiate with us? Does it mean the central government can no longer pursue unification if Taiwan wants to maintain status quo? Obviously not.

The great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation pushes us to set a timetable for reunification. Today's China is the closest ever to realizing the great rejuvenation."

"Peter Enav, former Taiwan correspondent for the Associated Press, believes that the mainland will use force to unite Taiwan in 2018, and conditions are increasingly mature for the mainland government to forcefully take over Taiwan."

There's a lot packed into these sentences. The first is as you have said, the presence of the Jade and China thinking it alone is strong enough to do whatever it likes.

Another point is "public opinion" which is nonsense. They do care about public opinion, however they are just as aware of manipulating public opinion as they are of caring whether the people get angry or not. The opinion is that of the CCP.

So, I think you are right to look at what the CCP thinks and wants. How they function and the inherent desire of the politicians to do better based on the way of measuring success that they themselves have set up. For example city leaders want their city to grow. You have regional capitals that are getting to 8 million and far more people and growing all the time. Growth is a sign of success. So when you become leader of the country, you carry this mentality on.

For Xi Jingping, what is his mentality?

But the CCP is perfect for China, a country that has followed the strong leader for thousands of years. They say in Russia that Democracy isn't right for them, they don't understand it. I'm not sure if this is the case, but the mentality is there.
In China, for there to be Democracy, you'd need people who can think for themselves, yet the schools are producing robots who don't think. They can do math easily, but doing critical thinking is almost impossible, they don't get it, don't understand it. They're waiting for someone to tell them the answer.

Now, looking back to Japan, why are Japan and China polar opposites? Is Confucianism something to do with this? Or did Confucianism just function differently for people with different mentalities. They do like their quotes and idioms, but often they say them, and ignore them, as if they've done something good, now time to go back to making money.

I do think there is a Chinese mentality that is all about making money first and foremost. They're good business people and will do whatever it takes to be successful, and with business you don't rock the boat. War rocks the boat if you're not strong enough. So the Chinese look to being strong, they don't care if the individual is weaker.

This is, of course, a rambling lot of interconnected things that I haven't quite managed to figure out how it all functions. It's complex.

I would guess as an easier summary, the Chinese people are different, different mentality, such a mentality impacts the CCP and influences the CCP because the leaders come from the general population, but they also need to control the general population. But they are an ambitious people, selfish in a way that means they don't really care so much about others around them, it's all about them first, but within the mentality that strength is good.
 
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Vikrant

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^ Indeed, you are right on the mark about the importance of Chinese being different. They are not better. They are not worse. They are just different. It is pointless for an Indian to engage in argument with a Chinese on whose ways are better. It will be far more productive if Indians started to understand Chinese culture from the interest of security.

One of the subjects that keeps surfacing is that why democracy has succeeded in India but not in China? The answer could be very simple; Indians are interested in democracy and Chinese are not. There is no other divine explanation for it.

Ancient Chinese wisdom dictates that opinions by themselves have no value. Their value lies in who utters them. So a loud fart from someone strong like Mao is more valuable than pearls of wisdom from someone weak. Weakness has no place in Chinese society as per tradition. Politeness is considered weakness. It is because only a person who cannot afford to offend someone needs to be polite. Otherwise, politeness is only reserved among peers of equal status to contain potential conflict from flaring up because any conflict among the peers will result in stalemate. It is needless to say that this sort of disposition is not conducive to democracy.

If Indians want Chinese to be polite to them, they need to cut the crap like live and let live. Indians need to continue with their military buildup.
 
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baileyn45

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I've seen studies that rank China as the most racist country on the planet. One researcher that I saw interviewed made the comment that in China it's not about Chinese and Blacks or Whites but even Koreans.
 
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Vikrant

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I've seen studies that rank China as the most racist country on the planet. One researcher that I saw interviewed made the comment that in China it's not about Chinese and Blacks or Whites but even Koreans.

Chinese are racists towards Indians. There is no dispute about that. However, comparatively speaking, Chinese racism towards Indians is much milder than what Indians face from Middle East and Euros. Indian movies do very well in China. This would not have been the case if Chinese at large were racist towards Indians. Recently, an Indian movie Dangal earned $200M in one month in China. Can you imagine an Indian movie making that kind of money in Europe or Middle East?

I am afraid the root cause of the problem that is manifesting itself at the border does not lie in racism; it lies in Chinese culture. Chinese culture promotes extreme competition among its members. Even in a family, a member is expected to do very well or else he brings shame to the family. The value of a family member solely lies in his ability to contribute towards the family. A member who is unable to fullfill this obligation is considered a failure and useless. This brings loss of face for that member. This is the ultimate fear of a Chinese person - ending up a useless person. This is why preserving one's face (false pride) at all cost is heavily emphasized in Chinese society.

Now, expand this to the national level and you will understand why an average Chinese is OK with the oppressive regime that governs him. Average Chinese supports Communist Party of China (CPC) because it gives him a sense of belonging; he feels he is being useful to the family (nation). Doing anything contrary will only result in loss of face and loss of face is unacceptable to a Chinese. CPC can exploit him to the fullest, he will still support it. His support for CPC will only waver if CPC is made to lose face.

Putting this in the context of conflict with India, China is hesitant to attack India because it is not sure it can win a war against India. A loss of war against India will result in loss of face and you can easily guess the consequences of loss of face for CPC.

For Indians it is different. They are not fighting to save face or snatch someone's land. They are fighting in defense of their country - win or lose, they have no other choice but to fight.
 
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Unkotare

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The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

All right. It is time to expand our conversation on Chinese culture and its implication on peace and security of countries that adjoin China. I have always attempted to explain Chinese behavior towards its neighbors through the lens of CPC. I have to admit though that understanding CPC was not enough in explaining blatant Chinese aggression towards its neighbors especially those neighbors that were not in a position to put up a fight against China.

Recently, I have been taking interest in ancient history of China along with evolution of Chinese idioms. There is an ancient Chinese idiom that goes something like this Treasuring a Jade Pendant. The origin of this idiom lies in an ancient folk lore, a tale of a poor peasant who found a Jade pendant. The poor peasant was killed and his precious Jade pendant was taken away from him by a robber. The robber who took the Jade pendant was also killed by someone else for the Jade pendant. This vicious wave continued till the Jade pendant ended up in the hands of someone who was strong enough to wear the Jade pendant openly and defend it. So in the minds of Chinese leaders Tibetans did not deserve to hold on to Tibet because they could not defend it.

Unless Chinese are convinced that India can defend the Jade pendant, Chinese will continue to push the envelope. I think India's latest move of deploying A5 nuclear missiles against China along with massive deployment of men and equipment on Indo-Tibet border is India's way of letting China know that India will defend the Jade pendant.

It's interesting, and possibly this sort of logic is what pushes the Chinese.

Looking to Taiwan, as I said, you have the article I read in Monday's edition of the Global Times, one of these govt hack newspapers. The article is "Timetable needed for unification of Taiwan" written by a Zhou Zhihuai.

"Even if the Taiwanese public wants to maintain the status quo, public opinion in the mainland requires national reunification. As far back as the 1980s, former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping raised the question: Are we going to give up reunification if Taiwan authorities refuse to negotiate with us? Does it mean the central government can no longer pursue unification if Taiwan wants to maintain status quo? Obviously not.

The great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation pushes us to set a timetable for reunification. Today's China is the closest ever to realizing the great rejuvenation."

"Peter Enav, former Taiwan correspondent for the Associated Press, believes that the mainland will use force to unite Taiwan in 2018, and conditions are increasingly mature for the mainland government to forcefully take over Taiwan."

There's a lot packed into these sentences. The first is as you have said, the presence of the Jade and China thinking it alone is strong enough to do whatever it likes.

Another point is "public opinion" which is nonsense. They do care about public opinion, however they are just as aware of manipulating public opinion as they are of caring whether the people get angry or not. The opinion is that of the CCP.

So, I think you are right to look at what the CCP thinks and wants. How they function and the inherent desire of the politicians to do better based on the way of measuring success that they themselves have set up. For example city leaders want their city to grow. You have regional capitals that are getting to 8 million and far more people and growing all the time. Growth is a sign of success. So when you become leader of the country, you carry this mentality on.

For Xi Jingping, what is his mentality?

But the CCP is perfect for China, a country that has followed the strong leader for thousands of years. They say in Russia that Democracy isn't right for them, they don't understand it. I'm not sure if this is the case, but the mentality is there.
In China, for there to be Democracy, you'd need people who can think for themselves, yet the schools are producing robots who don't think. They can do math easily, but doing critical thinking is almost impossible, they don't get it, don't understand it. They're waiting for someone to tell them the answer.

Now, looking back to Japan, why are Japan and China polar opposites? Is Confucianism something to do with this? Or did Confucianism just function differently for people with different mentalities. They do like their quotes and idioms, but often they say them, and ignore them, as if they've done something good, now time to go back to making money.

I do think there is a Chinese mentality that is all about making money first and foremost. They're good business people and will do whatever it takes to be successful, and with business you don't rock the boat. War rocks the boat if you're not strong enough. So the Chinese look to being strong, they don't care if the individual is weaker.

This is, of course, a rambling lot of interconnected things that I haven't quite managed to figure out how it all functions. It's complex.

I would guess as an easier summary, the Chinese people are different, different mentality, such a mentality impacts the CCP and influences the CCP because the leaders come from the general population, but they also need to control the general population. But they are an ambitious people, selfish in a way that means they don't really care so much about others around them, it's all about them first, but within the mentality that strength is good.



What a load of ignorant, bigoted BS.
 
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Vikrant

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The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

All right. It is time to expand our conversation on Chinese culture and its implication on peace and security of countries that adjoin China. I have always attempted to explain Chinese behavior towards its neighbors through the lens of CPC. I have to admit though that understanding CPC was not enough in explaining blatant Chinese aggression towards its neighbors especially those neighbors that were not in a position to put up a fight against China.

Recently, I have been taking interest in ancient history of China along with evolution of Chinese idioms. There is an ancient Chinese idiom that goes something like this Treasuring a Jade Pendant. The origin of this idiom lies in an ancient folk lore, a tale of a poor peasant who found a Jade pendant. The poor peasant was killed and his precious Jade pendant was taken away from him by a robber. The robber who took the Jade pendant was also killed by someone else for the Jade pendant. This vicious wave continued till the Jade pendant ended up in the hands of someone who was strong enough to wear the Jade pendant openly and defend it. So in the minds of Chinese leaders Tibetans did not deserve to hold on to Tibet because they could not defend it.

Unless Chinese are convinced that India can defend the Jade pendant, Chinese will continue to push the envelope. I think India's latest move of deploying A5 nuclear missiles against China along with massive deployment of men and equipment on Indo-Tibet border is India's way of letting China know that India will defend the Jade pendant.

It's interesting, and possibly this sort of logic is what pushes the Chinese.

Looking to Taiwan, as I said, you have the article I read in Monday's edition of the Global Times, one of these govt hack newspapers. The article is "Timetable needed for unification of Taiwan" written by a Zhou Zhihuai.

"Even if the Taiwanese public wants to maintain the status quo, public opinion in the mainland requires national reunification. As far back as the 1980s, former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping raised the question: Are we going to give up reunification if Taiwan authorities refuse to negotiate with us? Does it mean the central government can no longer pursue unification if Taiwan wants to maintain status quo? Obviously not.

The great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation pushes us to set a timetable for reunification. Today's China is the closest ever to realizing the great rejuvenation."

"Peter Enav, former Taiwan correspondent for the Associated Press, believes that the mainland will use force to unite Taiwan in 2018, and conditions are increasingly mature for the mainland government to forcefully take over Taiwan."

There's a lot packed into these sentences. The first is as you have said, the presence of the Jade and China thinking it alone is strong enough to do whatever it likes.

Another point is "public opinion" which is nonsense. They do care about public opinion, however they are just as aware of manipulating public opinion as they are of caring whether the people get angry or not. The opinion is that of the CCP.

So, I think you are right to look at what the CCP thinks and wants. How they function and the inherent desire of the politicians to do better based on the way of measuring success that they themselves have set up. For example city leaders want their city to grow. You have regional capitals that are getting to 8 million and far more people and growing all the time. Growth is a sign of success. So when you become leader of the country, you carry this mentality on.

For Xi Jingping, what is his mentality?

But the CCP is perfect for China, a country that has followed the strong leader for thousands of years. They say in Russia that Democracy isn't right for them, they don't understand it. I'm not sure if this is the case, but the mentality is there.
In China, for there to be Democracy, you'd need people who can think for themselves, yet the schools are producing robots who don't think. They can do math easily, but doing critical thinking is almost impossible, they don't get it, don't understand it. They're waiting for someone to tell them the answer.

Now, looking back to Japan, why are Japan and China polar opposites? Is Confucianism something to do with this? Or did Confucianism just function differently for people with different mentalities. They do like their quotes and idioms, but often they say them, and ignore them, as if they've done something good, now time to go back to making money.

I do think there is a Chinese mentality that is all about making money first and foremost. They're good business people and will do whatever it takes to be successful, and with business you don't rock the boat. War rocks the boat if you're not strong enough. So the Chinese look to being strong, they don't care if the individual is weaker.

This is, of course, a rambling lot of interconnected things that I haven't quite managed to figure out how it all functions. It's complex.

I would guess as an easier summary, the Chinese people are different, different mentality, such a mentality impacts the CCP and influences the CCP because the leaders come from the general population, but they also need to control the general population. But they are an ambitious people, selfish in a way that means they don't really care so much about others around them, it's all about them first, but within the mentality that strength is good.



What a load of ignorant, bigoted BS.

Here comes Captain One Liner :)
 

Unkotare

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The land in question is Bhutan and it certainly is not worthless. Bhutan perhaps is the smallest country in Asia. China invaded Bhutan. Indian troops kicked Chinese troops out of Bhutan. That is what this stand off is about. I personally think it will end in a war between India and China. China is not willing to give up its habit of land grab. India on the other hand had enough with Chinese shenanigans.

Coming back to the racist video produced by Chinese government, it is a sign of cultural immaturity on the part of China. I am baffled that they even thought that it was a good idea to produce a video like that.

The area in question is just mountainous snowy nothingness. Nobody lives there, there are no resources, nothing.

The whole thing is about military importance. Basically China would be a few less mountains away from India and find it much, much easier to get troops through in event of war, strengthening their military ability over India.

But yes, this is another case of China trying to grab more and more land and being the bully boy.

China doesn't really get culture, it's not that they're immature, it's that culture is just something to be played with and have your photo taken with it. The Chinese don't get why the Tibetans and Uighurs wouldn't want to become richer and have lots of high rise apartment buildings blighting their ancient cities.
If yous see the minorities in China you see that the govt actually promotes them for tourism, that's all the are, another curiosity for the han chinese to take photos with. Like the rest of the world is their zoo.

Every country has mountainous region where no one lives. That is not a valid reason for other countries to invade the mountainous region.

I agree with the rest of your post. I find your take on Chinese approach to culture quite interesting. I want to add my thoughts on that later. For now, I will say this: the area in question is very sensitive to India. There is not a chance that India will allow China to park itself in Bhutan. If China further escalates, there will be war without a doubt.

No, it's not. My point was that this whole episode is just pointless fighting over areas where no one lives and nothing really tangible to say why it's important, other than the military point as I said.

I am certainly not backing up the Chinese on this one or saying they are valid in their assertions.

Trust me, having seen all the disputes China has, and seeing the contradictory nature in which they conduct themselves.

Taiwan is Chinese because it's historically been Chinese for thousands of years.
Tibet is Chinese because we took it in the last 60 years and it's ours. Forget that it was Tibetan historically for thousands of years.
The Diaoyu Islands are even worse. China has never, ever had a claim on the damn things, and then suddenly decides that some treaty says they're Chinese when the treaty clearly does not say that.

I don't know as much about India as I do about China. The Indians might go to war, I don't know how a mountainous war would go with China's military, that right now is developing, it's getting better, but it's not quite there. The rhetoric from the Chinese govt seems quite low key at the moment, they don't seem to be preparing the people for war that much, though I might be wrong. I think China is just playing games and seeing how far it can push and hoping to get a little nationalistic sentiment out of it.

All right. It is time to expand our conversation on Chinese culture and its implication on peace and security of countries that adjoin China. I have always attempted to explain Chinese behavior towards its neighbors through the lens of CPC. I have to admit though that understanding CPC was not enough in explaining blatant Chinese aggression towards its neighbors especially those neighbors that were not in a position to put up a fight against China.

Recently, I have been taking interest in ancient history of China along with evolution of Chinese idioms. There is an ancient Chinese idiom that goes something like this Treasuring a Jade Pendant. The origin of this idiom lies in an ancient folk lore, a tale of a poor peasant who found a Jade pendant. The poor peasant was killed and his precious Jade pendant was taken away from him by a robber. The robber who took the Jade pendant was also killed by someone else for the Jade pendant. This vicious wave continued till the Jade pendant ended up in the hands of someone who was strong enough to wear the Jade pendant openly and defend it. So in the minds of Chinese leaders Tibetans did not deserve to hold on to Tibet because they could not defend it.

Unless Chinese are convinced that India can defend the Jade pendant, Chinese will continue to push the envelope. I think India's latest move of deploying A5 nuclear missiles against China along with massive deployment of men and equipment on Indo-Tibet border is India's way of letting China know that India will defend the Jade pendant.

It's interesting, and possibly this sort of logic is what pushes the Chinese.

Looking to Taiwan, as I said, you have the article I read in Monday's edition of the Global Times, one of these govt hack newspapers. The article is "Timetable needed for unification of Taiwan" written by a Zhou Zhihuai.

"Even if the Taiwanese public wants to maintain the status quo, public opinion in the mainland requires national reunification. As far back as the 1980s, former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping raised the question: Are we going to give up reunification if Taiwan authorities refuse to negotiate with us? Does it mean the central government can no longer pursue unification if Taiwan wants to maintain status quo? Obviously not.

The great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation pushes us to set a timetable for reunification. Today's China is the closest ever to realizing the great rejuvenation."

"Peter Enav, former Taiwan correspondent for the Associated Press, believes that the mainland will use force to unite Taiwan in 2018, and conditions are increasingly mature for the mainland government to forcefully take over Taiwan."

There's a lot packed into these sentences. The first is as you have said, the presence of the Jade and China thinking it alone is strong enough to do whatever it likes.

Another point is "public opinion" which is nonsense. They do care about public opinion, however they are just as aware of manipulating public opinion as they are of caring whether the people get angry or not. The opinion is that of the CCP.

So, I think you are right to look at what the CCP thinks and wants. How they function and the inherent desire of the politicians to do better based on the way of measuring success that they themselves have set up. For example city leaders want their city to grow. You have regional capitals that are getting to 8 million and far more people and growing all the time. Growth is a sign of success. So when you become leader of the country, you carry this mentality on.

For Xi Jingping, what is his mentality?

But the CCP is perfect for China, a country that has followed the strong leader for thousands of years. They say in Russia that Democracy isn't right for them, they don't understand it. I'm not sure if this is the case, but the mentality is there.
In China, for there to be Democracy, you'd need people who can think for themselves, yet the schools are producing robots who don't think. They can do math easily, but doing critical thinking is almost impossible, they don't get it, don't understand it. They're waiting for someone to tell them the answer.

Now, looking back to Japan, why are Japan and China polar opposites? Is Confucianism something to do with this? Or did Confucianism just function differently for people with different mentalities. They do like their quotes and idioms, but often they say them, and ignore them, as if they've done something good, now time to go back to making money.

I do think there is a Chinese mentality that is all about making money first and foremost. They're good business people and will do whatever it takes to be successful, and with business you don't rock the boat. War rocks the boat if you're not strong enough. So the Chinese look to being strong, they don't care if the individual is weaker.

This is, of course, a rambling lot of interconnected things that I haven't quite managed to figure out how it all functions. It's complex.

I would guess as an easier summary, the Chinese people are different, different mentality, such a mentality impacts the CCP and influences the CCP because the leaders come from the general population, but they also need to control the general population. But they are an ambitious people, selfish in a way that means they don't really care so much about others around them, it's all about them first, but within the mentality that strength is good.




The whole "Chinese students are robots" BS is the epitome of ignorant bigotry.
 
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Vikrant

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Coming back to topic.

---

Beyond the pale: China’s cheerful racists

Setting off to spend a year teaching English in Zhejiang province in south-eastern China, I expected plenty of surprises. But what struck me most was something they tend not to tell you about in the guidebooks: the racism.

It started when I went around the classroom, asking pupils which city they were from. When I got to a slightly darker-skinned boy, his classmates thought it was hilarious to shout ‘Africa!’ It’s a theme. A girl with a similar complexion was taunted with monkey sounds; her peers refused to sit next to her, saying she smelt bad. I apparently erred when, teaching the word for wife, I showed my students a picture of Michelle Obama. The image of the then First Lady was greeted with exaggerated sounds of repulsion: ‘So ugly!’ they said. ‘So black!’

...

Beyond the pale: China’s cheerful racists | The Spectator
 

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