Can you really get right from doing wrong? Must read

AirTight

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.
 

Biff_Poindexter

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.
Ok boot licker
 

my2¢

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Holding only one side accountable seems to indicate to me that they have done away with the crime of resisting arrest.
 

Dragonlady

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

One side has a history of abusing and murdering the other side for NO GOOD REASON, other than they can. THAT doesn't happen to nice white boys like YOU.

You assume that that black people would be treated like white people if they just complied, but as we see time, after time, after time they're not. George Floyd complied and he's dead. Ditto Orlando Castille.

The Army Lieutenant in the SUV was polite, compliant, and reasonable and he was abused, pepper sprayed, beaten and arrested. He did nothing wrong at all. He had a temporary license plate. That was his "crime". They approached his vehicle with guns drawn. Why? They refused to answer his question as to why he was stopped. They just kept screaming at him.

I've been stopped numerous times by the police. They've never drawn their guns, screamed at me, or any of the things we routinely see police do when they do a traffic stop when the driver is black. They are calm, polite, and respectful. Even when I got "lippy", I wasn't pepper sprayed, dragged out of my car, or beaten.

And not once ever was I pulled over for "driving while white".
 

Gdjjr

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My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer
Respect is earned- demanding it will get no respect, only fear, and when one is fearful they lash out at the nearest object- no matter what title the object is adorned with.
 

BlindBoo

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

 
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AirTight

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

One side has a history of abusing and murdering the other side for NO GOOD REASON, other than they can. THAT doesn't happen to nice white boys like YOU.

You assume that that black people would be treated like white people if they just complied, but as we see time, after time, after time they're not. George Floyd complied and he's dead. Ditto Orlando Castille.

The Army Lieutenant in the SUV was polite, compliant, and reasonable and he was abused, pepper sprayed, beaten and arrested. He did nothing wrong at all. He had a temporary license plate. That was his "crime". They approached his vehicle with guns drawn. Why? They refused to answer his question as to why he was stopped. They just kept screaming at him.

I've been stopped numerous times by the police. They've never drawn their guns, screamed at me, or any of the things we routinely see police do when they do a traffic stop when the driver is black. They are calm, polite, and respectful. Even when I got "lippy", I wasn't pepper sprayed, dragged out of my car, or beaten.

And not once ever was I pulled over for "driving while white".

Other than not getting lippy, I have the same experience as you. The only difference being, I was driving while black. I guess you learned something new.
 

Dekster

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

.... George Floyd complied and he's dead. ....

That isn't even remotely true. His freaking out refusing to be put in the car is what got him face down beside it on the pavement to begin with. He certainly didn't deserve what happened to him, but he was absolutely not compliant.
 

Prof.Lunaphiles

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The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?
Do you think that you are the first person to recognize this and that we need to learn from you?

I see you are new here. Maybe you should review some discussions in the Race Relations category, and get a better understanding of what's going on
 
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AirTight

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The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?
Do you think that you are the first person to recognize this and that we need to learn from you?

I see you are new here. Maybe you should review some discussions in the Race Relations category, and get a better understanding of what's going on

I don't post much, but I joined in 2018. This goes beyond race regulations. The title Is can you get right by doing wrong. I just picked a current event to use. Think about the move Insomnia.
 

Dragonlady

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

One side has a history of abusing and murdering the other side for NO GOOD REASON, other than they can. THAT doesn't happen to nice white boys like YOU.

You assume that that black people would be treated like white people if they just complied, but as we see time, after time, after time they're not. George Floyd complied and he's dead. Ditto Orlando Castille.

The Army Lieutenant in the SUV was polite, compliant, and reasonable and he was abused, pepper sprayed, beaten and arrested. He did nothing wrong at all. He had a temporary license plate. That was his "crime". They approached his vehicle with guns drawn. Why? They refused to answer his question as to why he was stopped. They just kept screaming at him.

I've been stopped numerous times by the police. They've never drawn their guns, screamed at me, or any of the things we routinely see police do when they do a traffic stop when the driver is black. They are calm, polite, and respectful. Even when I got "lippy", I wasn't pepper sprayed, dragged out of my car, or beaten.

And not once ever was I pulled over for "driving while white".

Other than not getting lippy, I have the same experience as you. The only difference being, I was driving while black. I guess you learned something new.

I have never encountered a black man who has never been rousted, hassled for no reason, or treated like shit by the police. You are the unicorn we all have been seeking.

Even in Canada, every one of my black friends can tell you stories of getting pulled over and rousted by the cops for driving while black. Black professional men. The teenage sons of a prominent black lawyer in Toronto got manhandled, and arrested for "resisting" arrest after they flashed a "peace" sign at a passing patrol car while waiting for streetcar outside the Business depot. The settlement was $2 million for the boys.

The OPP even pulled over Donovan Bailey, for no other reason than he was a black man driving a brand new Porsche - that was in 1996 too - right after he won the Olympic Gold Medal.

I also note that in 1996, American police weren't killing 1000 Americans per year with impunity. And American blacks weren't being treated to almost daily videos of members of their community being abused and murdered by the cops.

This is from a 2012 study into police shootings of civilians:

Victims were majority white (52%) but disproportionately black (32%) with a fatality rate 2.8 times higher among blacks than whites. Most victims were reported to be armed (83%); however, black victims were more likely to be unarmed (14.8%) than white (9.4%) or Hispanic (5.8%) victims.


Things have only gotten worse in the years since.
 

FA_Q2

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

One side has a history of abusing and murdering the other side for NO GOOD REASON, other than they can. THAT doesn't happen to nice white boys like YOU.

You assume that that black people would be treated like white people if they just complied, but as we see time, after time, after time they're not. George Floyd complied and he's dead. Ditto Orlando Castille.

The Army Lieutenant in the SUV was polite, compliant, and reasonable and he was abused, pepper sprayed, beaten and arrested. He did nothing wrong at all. He had a temporary license plate. That was his "crime". They approached his vehicle with guns drawn. Why? They refused to answer his question as to why he was stopped. They just kept screaming at him.

I've been stopped numerous times by the police. They've never drawn their guns, screamed at me, or any of the things we routinely see police do when they do a traffic stop when the driver is black. They are calm, polite, and respectful. Even when I got "lippy", I wasn't pepper sprayed, dragged out of my car, or beaten.

And not once ever was I pulled over for "driving while white".
When you base your entire point on packs of lies and bullshit...
 

Concerned American

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.
That is called EQUALITY--BLM advocates do not want EQUALITY--they want BLACK PRIVILEGE.
 

Coyote

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

So...you are telling black people, a community with a long well recorded history of abuse by police to...comply and hope they'll get through it in one piece?

I'm not saying that all police abuse all black people or that they shouldn't be respectful to police but there are certainly plenty of instances where doing so has gotten them killed for example in higher numbers than whites...and plenty of incidents in the past but still within living memory of racially based police brutality.

Philandro Castille did what he was told. He got shot.
Terrance Crutcher did what he was told and had his hands in the air. He got shot.

How do you re-establish trust in order to fix the problem?
 

PatriotJohn888

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I'm not saying that all police abuse all black people or that they shouldn't be respectful to police but there are certainly plenty of instances where doing so has gotten them killed for example in higher numbers than whites...

Can you provide any facts to back up this claim?
 

DigitalDrifter

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And now thanks to liberal leaders like Joe Biden, Kimilia Harris, Maxine Waters, and a host of others, they've sent the message out to black people that it's now ok to fight off cops no matter what the situation is.

Liberals are pussies, who have bent over and grabbed their ankles to be butt-fucked by the radical mob!
 
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AirTight

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

So...you are telling black people, a community with a long well recorded history of abuse by police to...comply and hope they'll get through it in one piece?

I'm not saying that all police abuse all black people or that they shouldn't be respectful to police but there are certainly plenty of instances where doing so has gotten them killed for example in higher numbers than whites...and plenty of incidents in the past but still within living memory of racially based police brutality.

Philandro Castille did what he was told. He got shot.
Terrance Crutcher did what he was told and had his hands in the air. He got shot.

How do you re-establish trust in order to fix the problem?

I suggest always having a professional appearance is key. Don't fit the profile of a gang member or rapper. Along with complying u will still have some instances of police being rude, but the more we comply police brutality will stop. Police will see there not going to get any action out of stopping black people.
 

FA_Q2

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

So...you are telling black people, a community with a long well recorded history of abuse by police to...comply and hope they'll get through it in one piece?

I'm not saying that all police abuse all black people or that they shouldn't be respectful to police but there are certainly plenty of instances where doing so has gotten them killed for example in higher numbers than whites...and plenty of incidents in the past but still within living memory of racially based police brutality.

Philandro Castille did what he was told. He got shot.
Terrance Crutcher did what he was told and had his hands in the air. He got shot.

How do you re-establish trust in order to fix the problem?
We cannot until the media feeding frenzy on race baiting ends.

Trust was lost more because every times racism can be implied even if it is blatantly false it will be the headline. The problem starts with the consumption of daily hate and victimhood.

There is a LOT the police need to reform in general, the vast majority having more to do with abuse of power than racism. Nothing, absolutely nothing, will establish trust though as long as we cling to victimhood and the need to make everything about a race war's struggle for power.
 

Richard-H

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The motivations of anyone that wants to be a police officer should be questioned. They should all undergo periodic psychological evaluations.

Most police are just people that need a job, and they do their jobs very well.

However, there are many (that I've known) who are excessively authoritarian and even sadistic. Being a Police officer gives them an opportunity to live their neurosis.

Many have a complete disregard for the law - they consider it an obstacle to work around. They want to BE THE LAW, not to enforce laws made by other people.

Unfortunately, the good police are not required to challenge the bad police. The bad police set the culture of paranoia that justifies their actions.
 

Coyote

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In 96 I got stopped by police and found out my license was suspended. The officer took me to the station and I spent a few hours in a holding cell. While I was there to cops brought in two black men one of them worked where I did at the time. Both of them were cursing the officers out, calling them every file name you can think of. White MF's, etc. The cops just ignored them.

The majority of these police interactions start with a black person not complying or resisting and they end up getting killed. The police are wrong for using excessive force, but the person was also wrong for not doing what they were told also. Everyone is only looking at what the police do rightfully so, but no one is telling black people to comply and be respectful to cops. Is the problem really fixed by only addressing one side of it?

My opinion is no. I think you will get more black people thinking they don't have to respect any police officer like what I witnessed "inside" a police station in 96. You will also get people not wanting to be police officers anymore and the result to that would be more crime.

You can't only hold one side accountable.

So...you are telling black people, a community with a long well recorded history of abuse by police to...comply and hope they'll get through it in one piece?

I'm not saying that all police abuse all black people or that they shouldn't be respectful to police but there are certainly plenty of instances where doing so has gotten them killed for example in higher numbers than whites...and plenty of incidents in the past but still within living memory of racially based police brutality.

Philandro Castille did what he was told. He got shot.
Terrance Crutcher did what he was told and had his hands in the air. He got shot.

How do you re-establish trust in order to fix the problem?
We cannot until the media feeding frenzy on race baiting ends.

Trust was lost more because every times racism can be implied even if it is blatantly false it will be the headline. The problem starts with the consumption of daily hate and victimhood.

There is a LOT the police need to reform in general, the vast majority having more to do with abuse of power than racism. Nothing, absolutely nothing, will establish trust though as long as we cling to victimhood and the need to make everything about a race war's struggle for power.

The trust was lost long before any "any media race baiting" and there are people alive who well remember those days. When I say those events are still in living memory, I mean it. How is that "clinging to victimhood"?
 

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