Anyone here been in a Hurricane?

tigerred59

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:
Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
 
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Sunni Man

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Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
I have no idea what you are talking about you freaking racist retard. .... :cuckoo:

I was just telling my personal story about when I was in a hurricane and the struggles of living with the immediate aftermath. It had nothing to do with Puerto Rico or the President.

I suggest that you seek out a mental health professional and start immediate therapy sessions. .... :cool:
 

fncceo

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:
Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
Are you going to tell us now how it's so much harder to pretend to be a Black person on the Internet than it is to be in a hurricane?
 

tigerred59

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Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
I have no idea what you are talking about you freaking retard. .... :cuckoo:

I was just telling my personal story about when I was in a hurricane and the struggles of living with the immediate aftermath. It had nothing to do with Puerto Rico or the President.

I suggest that you seek out a mental health professional and start immediate therapy sessions. .... :cool:
And the only fuckin reason your telling your story is to remind us how hard it is to recoup and regroup, something I'm 1000% certain is aimed at the people of PR...because Harvey has been 4 weeks out and no complaints and no sorry ass stories from your white ass.....now we get a story? Moron, do I look stupid to you and stop thinking I'm white and dumb, I am not!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

tigerred59

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:
Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
Are you going to tell us now how it's so much harder to pretend to be a Black person on the Internet than it is to be in a hurricane?
I got one question, why on God's green beautiful earth would anybody want to pretend to black, because they're white??????? you lice balls are nothing to want to be, get over yourselves.
 

Tipsycatlover

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Hurricane Carol. My parents and I were in Bickford's cafeteria. The windows were borded up but I could see between the boards. Trash was everywhere. And stupid people were out. I remember a woman trying to go down the street with an umbrella that did nothing. It blew inside out. Then she fell and couldn't get up. She was flopping around like a fish still gripping that junk umbrella.

For years afterwards, everytime it rained, I thought it was going to be a hurricane.
 

Tilly

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:
Big fuckin difference moron, you had options to travel to other parts of the country, these people don't...so save your fuckin story for somebody that gives a damn, idiot. Pr is a different story, these people are poor living on a fuckin island, idiot!! And typical of another anti govern white fuck with his fema hands out.
:cuckoo:
 

Claudette

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People today live with a microwave mentality.

They expect government relief agencies to respond instantly and fix their problems now.

I think fast food places like McDonalds has warped people's perspective about how long things like restoring electric power really takes in disaster situations. .... :cool:
I've been through many hurricanes as I live in Florida.

I don't need anyone to take care of me. I take care of myself. Had a few roof leaks in the last one, Irma, but no damage. I had plenty of water and a grill to cook on.

FPL had the power back on in two days. Those guys and the other power companies that helped get the power back did an outstanding job. Kudo's to them.
 

JOSweetHeart

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Thankfully, I have never experienced any kind of natural disaster.

God bless you always!!!

Holly

P.S. I was once hit by lightning, (The car I was in got hit.) but obviously I lived to tell about it. The car had to be replaced, but in the grand scheme of course that is very little to complain about.
 

TyroneSlothrop

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Conservative65

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:

HUGO in 1989.
 

Marion Morrison

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Charlie, Wilma, Irma.

^Those were the worst


Andrew(indirect) Elena.

It seems one only remembers the serious ones. Probably several more that were kind of a snoozefest.
 

aris2chat

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My family and I were in one of large hurricanes that hit Florida several years ago. We slept on the hallway floor of a middle school that was being used as a shelter along with 100's of strangers for one night.

By noon the next morning the winds had died down enough to leave the shelter and attempt to drive about 3 miles to home. The streets were covered with all kinds of rubble and debris. So I had to drive very slowly and snake my way to avoid the trash. When I got into my neighborhood it was even worse. Large trees everywhere had been uprooted and were laying all over the streets. You had to drive around them thru people's front yards and flower beds to reach home.

My house was in good shape with almost no damage. There was no electricity and the plumbing didn't work. We just camped out and used the outdoor grill to cook on. I had already stocked a weeks worth of food and water, so we were set. But it got very boring with nothing to do, and being it was summer, we all wanted a shower and the AC working to help sleep at night.

There was no cell phone service, so I drove all around looking to find a signal and tell my relatives we had survived and everything was good. For 3 days I periodically drove around trying to get a cell signal. I happened to see a guy in the middle of a big field talking on his cell phone. I parked my car and walked around the field hoping to acquire a signal, but got nothing. Frustrated, I approached him and asked how he was able to get a cell signal? He pointed to one spot on the ground and said this was the only place he had found that worked after walking all over the entire field. I stood on that spot and instantly had service to make calls. How the guy found that spot in the middle of that huge field is beyond me?

The main Interstate had a collapsed bridge, and a lot of the roads leading into the city had been completely washed away. So it took FEMA and the National Guard about 3 days to start to arrive and begin major relief efforts. But when they finally were able to safely navigate their way into the disaster area, there was a steady parade of vehicles.

There was no rhyme or rhythm to who had their power restored. One side of the street might have power, and the other side of the street, people still had to wait a couple more weeks. I was fortunate and my power returned on day 5

It had been a week and my food and water supplies were getting low. I started driving around and was able to locate a FEMA aid relief station. They loaded my car up with MRE's (meals ready to eat) and cases of bottled water. Which we lived on for about a week until the local stores opened back up with stocked shelves.

By now my car was getting low on gas and the fuel gauge showed less the 1/4 of a tank. I found a small gas station that had cars filling their tanks, so I took a place in line. After about and hour I was the next car in line to use the pump went the gasoline storage went dry. And the station said, "sorry folks, it's empty". Grrrr!!!

On the way home, I happen to notice several National Guard trucks and a large diesel generator parked next to the gas pumps at the local Wal-Mart parking lot. Working on a hunch, I got up at sunrise to be the first one in line. When I arrived, I was like car number 50. Apparently a lot of people had the same idea as me. Within an hour there was at least a couple of hundred cars in line behind me. It was really hot setting out in the Florida summer sun. The NG personal were able to hook up the generator, get the pumps working, and I was able to fill up my cars gas tank by around noon.

After a couple of weeks things were back to normal for me and my family. But many people had houses with roofs torn off and totally destroyed by water damage. FEMA provided them with small temporary trailers as available. Eventually, temporary trailer parks were opened throughout the city, and thousands of people stayed in them rent free up to 18 months.

People who have never been in a hurricane and endured the aftermath, have no idea how much effort it takes government relief agencies to respond to such a monumental natural disaster.

As for me, I thought FEMA and the National Guard did an outstanding job. Although you would never know it listening to the media pontificating nothing but negativity from their cloistered armchair coverage of the event. ..... :cool:

a few including Wilma. My daughter gave birth during that one.
 

aris2chat

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got caught, with two young kids in the car, drive to PA during Andrew

Nice thing about sand storms, at least is Saudi, are the desert roses. Best thing is to leave them alone, and keep growing.
 

EverCurious

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People today live with a microwave mentality.

They expect government relief agencies to respond instantly and fix their problems now.

I think fast food places like McDonalds has warped peoples perspective about how long things like restoring electric power really takes to repair in disaster situations. .... :cool:
Lotta peeps get soooooo dependent on electricity. Then fall to pieces.

Me, I like a good power outage. Lets you know what your world would be like without this rampant 24/7 fake daylight. Makes you get creative.
It DEPENDS.....when Sandy came through we had huge early snowfall and low temperatures that brought down trees and powerlines all over the state. Because we had well water - without power we had no water or heat other than the wood stove insert. It was interesting - we essentially lived in one room for heat and light and we did get creative. But it lasted a week. And it was cold. Somehow the water situation was what really dragged me down. It was hard to be creative.
You should get an emergency hand pump, they run about $700 depending on the depth of your well. At a /bare/ minimum get a well bucket (Lemans has those for < $100) If you're really hard up for cash do this - Make your own deep well bucket - Preparedness AdvicePreparedness Advice and stow it for emergency.


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I've been through lots of earthquakes (I think the biggest was an 8.6, broke some of my carousel horses,) hid in the basement from fear of a tornado (it ripped through a corn field a few miles away and gave us dinner,) I've been hit by lightning (close enough anyway, it hit the air conditioner in the window as I was rounding the corner of my bio-dad's house and chucked me clean across the yard into the garage; knocked me out for a good while.)

The worst "disaster" I've had to deal with was actually the ash fallout from Helen's, I'm still cleaning that shit out of my furniture... I remember it was so bad that they recommended you not drive at all because it was eating car engines. Air filters were packed, the shit got into the oil, transmission fluid, antifreeze and just chowdered everything. Then it snowed... or maybe it rained... either way, I made the mistake of turning on the windshield wipers - ended up buying a new windshield an hour later...
 
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Sunni Man

Sunni Man

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One of my friends at work had the worst luck during the hurricane. He had two pictures mounted on the wall behind his desk.

One picture was of his house near the beach. The tidal storm surge that came off the Gulf was 20 foot high and flattened his home.

The other picture was his brand new pickup truck. He had relatives who lived around 100 miles inland. So he drove to their place and parked the pickup next to their house to keep it safe from the hurricane. Unfortunately, one of the large oak trees in the yard was uprooted by the high winds and crushed the truck. .... :cool:
 

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