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Antibacterial Chemical Raises Safety Issues

Ringel05

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The maker of Dial Complete hand soap says that it kills more germs than any other brand. But is it safe?
That question has federal regulators, consumer advocates and soap manufacturers locked in a battle over the active ingredient in Dial Complete and many other antibacterial soaps, a chemical known as triclosan.
The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the safety of the chemical, which was created more than 40 years ago as a surgical scrub for hospitals. Triclosan is now in a range of consumer products, including soaps, kitchen cutting boards and even a best-selling toothpaste, Colgate Total. It is so prevalent that a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the chemical present in the urine of 75 percent of Americans over the age of 5.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/20/business/triclosan-an-antibacterial-chemical-in-consumer-products-raises-safety-issues.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss
 

waltky

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Antibacterial Soaps Could Pose Health Risks...

Is This the End of Antibacterial Soap?
December 16, 2013 ~ The Food and Drug Administration announced that it is cracking down on soap, and this is great news for Purell.
The FDA published a consumer update Monday on triclosan, the active ingredient in antibacterial soap, stating, "In fact, there currently is no evidence that over-the-counter antibacterial soap products are any more effective at preventing illness than washing with plain soap and water." And, "Moreover, antibacterial soap products contain chemical ingredients, such as triclosan and triclocarban, which may carry unnecessary risks given that their benefits are unproven."

The FDA will propose a rule that would put greater onus on manufacturers to back up the "antibacterial" claim. True, much of the benefit of soap comes from the mere act of rubbing your hands together and rinsing them with water. But as the FDA casts a wary eye toward hand soaps, there is a (slightly more) proven alternative—alcohol.



According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Alcohol-based products are more effective for standard handwashing or hand antisepsis by HCWs [health care workers] than soap or antimicrobial soaps." However, the CDC notes, in too-small volumes (.2 to .5 ml) soap and water are better than alcohol-based sanitizers. The FDA does mention, however, that for food-service personnel, hand sanitizers are no substitution for washing.

That being said, there's still some questions being raised about hand sanitizers. The FDA has also called out alcohol-based hand sanitizers in the past for claims that they can prevent MRSA infections. And it is still unclear whether they work "equally well for all classes of germs," the CDC reports. In any case, GOJO, the maker of Purell, is happy to point out that its product does not contain triclosan.

Is This the End of Antibacterial Soap? - NationalJournal.com
 

Zoom-boing

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I thought the big issue with anti-bacterial soap was that it could cause germs to become drug-resistant/mutation?

Anyone ever use these soaps? :eek: Maybe it's just me but my hands always itch and get small slits around the fingers when I use them ... even after just one use. No thanks. I'll stick with my bo-bo milk and honey brand from Target or if there's a good sale, Softsoaps milk and honey.
 

Delta4Embassy

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This isn't actually news and has been a long running debate. But many of the anti-bacterial wash makers have recalled their products or are phasing them out ahead of any legally mandated ban or recall. The chemical in question is triclosan. And studies have shown it causes bone thinning and other problems hence the controversy. As to other aspects like building up germs resistant to anti-germicides, that's really old news. I'm puzzled why it's even in the news of late. It's not news. Companies have already handled the issue.
 

DaisyJ123

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The maker of Dial Complete hand soap says that it kills more germs than any other brand. But is it safe?
That question has federal regulators, consumer advocates and soap manufacturers locked in a battle over the active ingredient in Dial Complete and many other antibacterial soaps, a chemical known as triclosan.
The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the safety of the chemical, which was created more than 40 years ago as a surgical scrub for hospitals. Triclosan is now in a range of consumer products, including soaps, kitchen cutting boards and even a best-selling toothpaste, Colgate Total. It is so prevalent that a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the chemical present in the urine of 75 percent of Americans over the age of 5.

Many antibacterial products are generally used in homes and deposited in drains. The triclosin reacts rapidly with chlorine present in water and forms chloroform. Only a small concentration of the chlorine will be enough to form the chloroform. Chloroform will affect the central nervous system of human body which is not good the health, it will also damages the liver and kidney.
In place of antibacterial products we can use normal soap and warm water to kill the germs. The key to kill germs is to wash your hands long enough instead of rinsing them immediately.
 

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