Amy Coney Barrett, possible Justice...non-violent felons should not lose their 2nd Amendment Rights.

playtime

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her husband, the decider, must be in favor of it.
Why would you call her husband the decider? Do you think women are subservient to their husbands and can't make their own decisions?
lol... 1st, let me preface my reply & say i am female & to answer your question:

NO.

but that is EXACTLY what her religious sect dictates.

Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members
Khaleda Rahman 54 mins ago
[...]

Members of the People of Praise are also assigned advisers of the same sex, called a "head" for men and a "handmaid" for women—until the latter phrase apparently became too charged following the release of Hulu's television adaption of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale. The novel portrays a totalitarian, theocratic regime where women are considered property of the state.

The term "handmaid" is rooted in the Bible. Mary, the mother of Jesus, described herself as "handmaid of the Lord." But the negative connotations from the show prompted People of Praise to start referring to female advisors as "women leaders," according to reports.

For a married women, her husband is her "head"—he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass. "Total discipline is imposed upon those who submit themselves to their head," said Theill, "and this includes submission of your will, your desire, your actions."
[...]
"In the case of a woman, her 'head' is her husband—that's who is in charge of her. That is the person who is supposed to be making all of her moral decisions and taking responsibility for the condition of her soul. It's really creepy, but that's the idea."
[...]
The "subordinate role of women to men is a fundamental cultural premise" for the group, he wrote.
[...]
The final straw, Reimers said, came when he had objected to instructions given to his wife by a handmaid. When he relayed his concerns to his head, he was told his wife was "trying to undermine God's plan for her life."

In Not Reliable Guides, Reimers described how a married woman in the People of Praise is "expected always to reflect the fact that she is under her husband's authority."
[...]
Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members
 

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I've always thought it unfair that a person convicted of a non-violent felony are stripped of their 2nd Amendment rights.
Cashing a stolen check or stealing a computer from a store resulting in a felony. Shouldn't put a person in the category of a dangerous criminal. ... :cool:
nor their right to vote.
 

Muhammed

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her husband, the decider, must be in favor of it.
Why would you call her husband the decider? Do you think women are subservient to their husbands and can't make their own decisions?
lol... 1st, let me preface my reply & say i am female & to answer your question:

NO.

but that is EXACTLY what her religious sect dictates.
Got any proof that that is what she believes, you stupid subservient kunt?
 

Sunni Man

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I do have to add, that if a person over the years has several non-violent felonies on their record and has served time in prison.
Then yes, they should lose their voting rights and 2nd amendments rights.
Because by their behavior they've shown they are not fit to participate in society as a moral law abiding citizen, and thus should not be allowed to vote or own a weapon. ... :cool:
 

playtime

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he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass.
Being a decider for the family and a moral compass doesn't mean he decides what she does as a professional justice tasked with upholding the Constitution.
uh-huh ... you didn't read the whole thing i bet. her religion will dictate her decisions.

she staunchly anti choice & that has everything to do with her beliefs.

if she were asked, (like mike pence ) what/who is she? to list in order
1st, 2nd 3rd...

a constitutional defender, a republican, or a ' christian ' ...

what do you think her answer would be?
 

playtime

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her husband, the decider, must be in favor of it.
Why would you call her husband the decider? Do you think women are subservient to their husbands and can't make their own decisions?
lol... 1st, let me preface my reply & say i am female & to answer your question:

NO.

but that is EXACTLY what her religious sect dictates.
Got any proof that that is what she believes, you stupid subservient kunt?
lol ... this has been covered when she was CONcidered for the SC gig, but breet got the job.
 

Orangecat

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her religion will dictate her decisions. she staunchly anti choice & that has everything to do with her beliefs.
You're allowed your opinion, but voicing it doesn't make it a fact.
if she were asked, (like mike pence ) what/who is she? to list in order
1st, 2nd 3rd...
a constitutional defender, a republican, or a ' christian ' ...
what do you think her answer would be?
My guess at what her answer would be is irrelevant conjecture, just like yours is.
I do think you need to use capital letters at the beginning of sentences if you want to appear educated, though.
 
Last edited:
OP
2aguy

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her husband, the decider, must be in favor of it.
Why would you call her husband the decider? Do you think women are subservient to their husbands and can't make their own decisions?
lol... 1st, let me preface my reply & say i am female & to answer your question:

NO.

but that is EXACTLY what her religious sect dictates.

Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members
Khaleda Rahman 54 mins ago
[...]

Members of the People of Praise are also assigned advisers of the same sex, called a "head" for men and a "handmaid" for women—until the latter phrase apparently became too charged following the release of Hulu's television adaption of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale. The novel portrays a totalitarian, theocratic regime where women are considered property of the state.

The term "handmaid" is rooted in the Bible. Mary, the mother of Jesus, described herself as "handmaid of the Lord." But the negative connotations from the show prompted People of Praise to start referring to female advisors as "women leaders," according to reports.

For a married women, her husband is her "head"—he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass. "Total discipline is imposed upon those who submit themselves to their head," said Theill, "and this includes submission of your will, your desire, your actions."
[...]
"In the case of a woman, her 'head' is her husband—that's who is in charge of her. That is the person who is supposed to be making all of her moral decisions and taking responsibility for the condition of her soul. It's really creepy, but that's the idea."
[...]
The "subordinate role of women to men is a fundamental cultural premise" for the group, he wrote.
[...]
The final straw, Reimers said, came when he had objected to instructions given to his wife by a handmaid. When he relayed his concerns to his head, he was told his wife was "trying to undermine God's plan for her life."

In Not Reliable Guides, Reimers described how a married woman in the People of Praise is "expected always to reflect the fact that she is under her husband's authority."
[...]
Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members

And you are wrong........Newsweek had to retract that link...

“How Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise group inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale,’” said the first iteration of the story’s headline. The headline now reads, “How Charismatic Catholic Groups Like Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise Inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale.’”

The report also bears a humiliating and flawed editor’s note, which reads:

This article's headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale'. The book's author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work. A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error.
----

Newsweek's report has been amended significantly since publication. But even the revisions cannot save it. It stated originally:

Members of People of Praise are assigned to personal advisers of the same sex — called a "head" for men and "handmaid" for women, until the rise in popularity of Atwood's novel and the television series based on it forced a change in the latter.

Atwood herself has indicated that the group's existence motivated her to write The Handmaid's Tale, set in the fictional Gilead, where women's bodies are governed and treated as the property of the state under a theocratic regime.
The latter paragraph now reads:

Atwood herself has previously referred to the practices of a charismatic Catholic group motivating her to write The Handmaid's Tale, set in the fictional Gilead, where women's bodies are governed and treated as the property of the state under a theocratic regime.
The revised version also includes a passage in which its author tries none-too-subtly to defend the article's original falsehood:

While Atwood has not elaborated on which sect she was referring to, a New Yorker profile of the author in 2017 mentions that in a box of newspaper clippings the author collected while writing the novel, there is "an Associated Press item reported on a Catholic congregation in New Jersey being taken over by a fundamentalist sect in which wives were called 'handmaidens' — a word that Atwood had underlined."

The clipping includes a spokesperson for the People of Hope sect based in Newark, New Jersey saying, "We're all Roman Catholics. We differ in the sense that we are a Charismatic group, which would mean that we have prayer meetings, during which there is raising of hands, singing and speaking in tongues."

People of Praise has never had a presence in the state of New Jersey.
People of Praise, People of Hope. Tomato, tamahto. You people all look the same. Also, as mentioned above, the Associated Press did not report on People of Hope until Atwood's book had already been published. Newsweek managed to screw up the original story, the editor's note, and even the freshly added paragraphs. Yet it refuses to retract the article.

As indefensible as Newsweek’s refusal to pull the story, which relies now on outright falsehoods and lurid innuendo, is the fact that the magazine is still promoting the initial lie on social media:

 
OP
2aguy

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he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass.
Being a decider for the family and a moral compass doesn't mean he decides what she does as a professional justice tasked with upholding the Constitution.
uh-huh ... you didn't read the whole thing i bet. her religion will dictate her decisions.

she staunchly anti choice & that has everything to do with her beliefs.

if she were asked, (like mike pence ) what/who is she? to list in order
1st, 2nd 3rd...

a constitutional defender, a republican, or a ' christian ' ...

what do you think her answer would be?

There is no religious test for holding office in the United States, so her religious views are off the table...
 

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Orangecat

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okey dokey. & when roe v wade comes b4 the SC, the first step in the complete overturning the law of the land; it will go back to the states.
It should go to the states, per the 10th Amendment. The Constitution says nothing about abortion. Or healthcare at all, for that matter.
I am pro-choice, btw. Just pay for your choices personally.
 

playtime

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he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass.
Being a decider for the family and a moral compass doesn't mean he decides what she does as a professional justice tasked with upholding the Constitution.
uh-huh ... you didn't read the whole thing i bet. her religion will dictate her decisions.

she staunchly anti choice & that has everything to do with her beliefs.

if she were asked, (like mike pence ) what/who is she? to list in order
1st, 2nd 3rd...

a constitutional defender, a republican, or a ' christian ' ...

what do you think her answer would be?

There is no religious test for holding office in the United States, so her religious views are off the table...
only if she keeps a wall of separation.
 

playtime

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her husband, the decider, must be in favor of it.
Why would you call her husband the decider? Do you think women are subservient to their husbands and can't make their own decisions?
lol... 1st, let me preface my reply & say i am female & to answer your question:

NO.

but that is EXACTLY what her religious sect dictates.

Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members
Khaleda Rahman 54 mins ago
[...]

Members of the People of Praise are also assigned advisers of the same sex, called a "head" for men and a "handmaid" for women—until the latter phrase apparently became too charged following the release of Hulu's television adaption of Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale. The novel portrays a totalitarian, theocratic regime where women are considered property of the state.

The term "handmaid" is rooted in the Bible. Mary, the mother of Jesus, described herself as "handmaid of the Lord." But the negative connotations from the show prompted People of Praise to start referring to female advisors as "women leaders," according to reports.

For a married women, her husband is her "head"—he makes the decisions for the family and serves as her moral compass. "Total discipline is imposed upon those who submit themselves to their head," said Theill, "and this includes submission of your will, your desire, your actions."
[...]
"In the case of a woman, her 'head' is her husband—that's who is in charge of her. That is the person who is supposed to be making all of her moral decisions and taking responsibility for the condition of her soul. It's really creepy, but that's the idea."
[...]
The "subordinate role of women to men is a fundamental cultural premise" for the group, he wrote.
[...]
The final straw, Reimers said, came when he had objected to instructions given to his wife by a handmaid. When he relayed his concerns to his head, he was told his wife was "trying to undermine God's plan for her life."

In Not Reliable Guides, Reimers described how a married woman in the People of Praise is "expected always to reflect the fact that she is under her husband's authority."
[...]
Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise and the Role of Women, According to Former Members

And you are wrong........Newsweek had to retract that link...

“How Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise group inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale,’” said the first iteration of the story’s headline. The headline now reads, “How Charismatic Catholic Groups Like Amy Coney Barrett's People of Praise Inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale.’”

The report also bears a humiliating and flawed editor’s note, which reads:

This article's headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired 'The Handmaid's Tale'. The book's author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work. A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error.
----

Newsweek's report has been amended significantly since publication. But even the revisions cannot save it. It stated originally:

Members of People of Praise are assigned to personal advisers of the same sex — called a "head" for men and "handmaid" for women, until the rise in popularity of Atwood's novel and the television series based on it forced a change in the latter.

Atwood herself has indicated that the group's existence motivated her to write The Handmaid's Tale, set in the fictional Gilead, where women's bodies are governed and treated as the property of the state under a theocratic regime.
The latter paragraph now reads:

Atwood herself has previously referred to the practices of a charismatic Catholic group motivating her to write The Handmaid's Tale, set in the fictional Gilead, where women's bodies are governed and treated as the property of the state under a theocratic regime.
The revised version also includes a passage in which its author tries none-too-subtly to defend the article's original falsehood:

While Atwood has not elaborated on which sect she was referring to, a New Yorker profile of the author in 2017 mentions that in a box of newspaper clippings the author collected while writing the novel, there is "an Associated Press item reported on a Catholic congregation in New Jersey being taken over by a fundamentalist sect in which wives were called 'handmaidens' — a word that Atwood had underlined."

The clipping includes a spokesperson for the People of Hope sect based in Newark, New Jersey saying, "We're all Roman Catholics. We differ in the sense that we are a Charismatic group, which would mean that we have prayer meetings, during which there is raising of hands, singing and speaking in tongues."

People of Praise has never had a presence in the state of New Jersey.
People of Praise, People of Hope. Tomato, tamahto. You people all look the same. Also, as mentioned above, the Associated Press did not report on People of Hope until Atwood's book had already been published. Newsweek managed to screw up the original story, the editor's note, and even the freshly added paragraphs. Yet it refuses to retract the article.


As indefensible as Newsweek’s refusal to pull the story, which relies now on outright falsehoods and lurid innuendo, is the fact that the magazine is still promoting the initial lie on social media:

she is a member of people of praise, correct?


"Handmaids”


The People of Praise has both men and women leaders. For many years, we referred to some of our women leaders as handmaids, following the use of the term by Mary, Jesus’s mother, who called herself “the handmaid of the Lord,” (Lk. 1:38). Mary is honored by millions as the first Christian and as a model believer. In keeping with this, the term handmaid originally honored a woman with an important relationship with God and a leadership role within our community. Recognizing that the meaning of this term has shifted dramatically in our culture in recent years, we no longer use the term handmaid to describe those women who are leaders in the People of Praise.


The People of Praise began using the term handmaid in the 1970s, well before Margaret Atwood wrote her famous novel (1985). The People of Praise community was not the inspiration for Ms. Atwood’s work.
The People of Praise Responds to Recent Press | People of Praise
 

playtime

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okey dokey. & when roe v wade comes b4 the SC, the first step in the complete overturning the law of the land; it will go back to the states.
It should go to the states, per the 10th Amendment. The Constitution says nothing about abortion. Or healthcare at all, for that matter.
I am pro-choice, btw. Just pay for your choices personally.
the hyde amendment, which has been around since the days of carter prevents federal money to pay for it.

going back to the states puts an undo burden on any female who has the cash, but has to cross state lines to obtain one if there are no clinics available where she lives.... guess that means that a back street butcher is good enough.
 

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