A different take on the NPR Keffuffle.

candycorn

Diamond Member
Aug 25, 2009
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Deep State Plant.
I happen to agree with some of what the economics editor said. There are times when I look at my radio or smart speaker and shake my head at some things I hear. I pointed out earlier this week that the American Public Media program Marketplace had an author on the show. She had written a book about the African American influence on country music pre Beyonce. Marketplace is a show about economics. The book had nothing to do with economics. No remote tie in whatsoever. Again...head shaking. The show isn’t an NPR show but NPR distributes the show.

I was listening to Wait Wait Don't Tell Me a few years back (an NPR program). For those of you who don't know, it is a game show on NPR where they have listeners call in and play games. One of the games is called "bluff the listener" where their 3 panelists tell a story from this week's news...but only one of the three stories is true. If the listener picks the right story, they get a prize. Well, the set up for this game was interesting vacation offerings (I promise I'm getting to the point) for those on a budget. The host is not playing the game. He's making a statement. On this segment, he sets up the game by stating the following--paraphrasing--"As most of us know, $4,000 isn't going to go very far on a vacation...." and the 3 panelists each told a story of someone offering a unique vacation for $4K. I don't know about you guys but for $4K...I can have a fucking incredible vacation. Maybe I'm just a savvy traveler...

At about the same time, another show I listened to--a news podcast called the Slate Political Gabfest--has these commentators. Slate is not NPR but they are essentially grapes from the same vine. The host can bring up topics that they discuss for 10-15 minutes and at the end they each get about 3 minutes to talk about whatever they want. The host brought up the fire at Notre Dame and these three commentators (I think you could call them all left or center-left safely) sat around and whined about losing this cathedral for a good 15 minutes citing the "many times" they were over there. Again, I don't know about you guys but Notre Dame catching fire didn't make me sad. I wish it hadn't burned of course but did this really shake the timbers of someone's life so much that it warranted this sort of attention? I would imagine many just kind of rolled their eyes at this caterwauling. What's next...are they going to interrupt regular programing to announce that Zabar's is closing their upper west side location? The horror...the horror.

The editor, Uri Berliner, said that NPR lost the trust of the American People. I think he’s wrong about that.





He writes:

"In recent years I’ve struggled to answer that question. Concerned by the lack of viewpoint diversity, I looked at voter registration for our newsroom. In D.C., where NPR is headquartered and many of us live, I found 87 registered Democrats working in editorial positions and zero Republicans. None."

"So on May 3, 2021, I presented the findings at an all-hands editorial staff meeting. When I suggested we had a diversity problem with a score of 87 Democrats and zero Republicans, the response wasn’t hostile. It was worse."

Well...what is the demographic of the newsroom in DC. Well read, college degreed, fact driven...does that sound like MAGA to you?

I don’t think the fault lines in the newsroom are on Democrat v. Republican. For one thing, I am pretty liberal but I have some real problems with the Democrats. MAGA has a lot of issues with the Republican Party. I think the fault line is between curious and not...engaged and not....intelligent and not. As for the listenership...the editor is silly to state that NPR has lost the trust. I mean...the right wing will not trust anything that pierces their delicate world view. Not all programming is for all audiences. Its probably that simple.

I think the fault lines in listenership are much less easy to see. I think it falls between the listeners they want and the listeners they have. They want well-heeled listeners who contribute. What they have are folks who listen and peruse the website because there are no paywalls and no commercials. Its truly refreshing!
 
From the piece. . .

". . .That wouldn’t be a problem for an openly polemical news outlet serving a niche audience. But for NPR, which purports to consider all things, it’s devastating both for its journalism and its business model. . . ."

<snip>

". . . But when the Mueller report found no credible evidence of collusion, NPR’s coverage was notably sparse. Russiagate quietly faded from our programming.. . ."

<snip>

". . When the essential facts of the Post’s reporting were confirmed and the emails verified independently about a year and a half later, we could have fessed up to our misjudgment. But, like Russia collusion, we didn’t make the hard choice of transparency. . . "

<snip>

". . Over the course of the pandemic, a number of investigative journalists made compelling, if not conclusive, cases for the lab leak. But at NPR, we weren’t about to swivel or even tiptoe away from the insistence with which we backed the natural origin story. We didn’t budge when the Energy Department—the federal agency with the most expertise about laboratories and biological research—concluded, albeit with low confidence, that a lab leak was the most likely explanation for the emergence of the virus.

Instead, we introduced our coverage of that development on February 28, 2023, by asserting confidently that “the scientific evidence overwhelmingly points to a natural origin for the virus.”

<snip>

". . . But the role and standing of affinity groups, including those outside NPR, were more than that. They became a priority for NPR’s union, SAG-AFTRA—an item in collective bargaining. The current contract, in a section on DEI, requires NPR management to “keep up to date with current language and style guidance from journalism affinity groups” and to inform employees if language differs from the diktats of those groups. In such a case, the dispute could go before the DEI Accountability Committee.

In essence, this means the NPR union, of which I am a dues-paying member, has ensured that advocacy groups are given a seat at the table in determining the terms and vocabulary of our news coverage. . . "



BUT? In Candy's Werld?

8n0zv9.jpg
 
I've had it up to here with the Leftist c*ck s*ckers implying that everyone who has a college degree - or an advance degree - is likely a Biden or Democrat supporter. You really need to get the fuck out of your echo chambers and talk to some real people. Talk to engineers, doctors, accountants - business administrators - whatever. You have no fucking idea. In my fifty-plus year career working as and with all manner of professional, almost all college degrees, I found that the vast majority of them were Republicans, and remain Republicans in the era of Trump; he has won three consecutive presidential nominations, eh?

"We" don't listen to NPR anymore, one can only tolerate so much Leftist propaganda, especially when you are PAYING FOR IT.

NPR has ZERO credibility as a news source. NOBODY fails to see the bias.
 
From the piece. . .

". . .That wouldn’t be a problem for an openly polemical news outlet serving a niche audience. But for NPR, which purports to consider all things, it’s devastating both for its journalism and its business model. . . ."

<snip>

". . . But when the Mueller report found no credible evidence of collusion, NPR’s coverage was notably sparse. Russiagate quietly faded from our programming.. . ."

<snip>

". . When the essential facts of the Post’s reporting were confirmed and the emails verified independently about a year and a half later, we could have fessed up to our misjudgment. But, like Russia collusion, we didn’t make the hard choice of transparency. . . "

<snip>

". . Over the course of the pandemic, a number of investigative journalists made compelling, if not conclusive, cases for the lab leak. But at NPR, we weren’t about to swivel or even tiptoe away from the insistence with which we backed the natural origin story. We didn’t budge when the Energy Department—the federal agency with the most expertise about laboratories and biological research—concluded, albeit with low confidence, that a lab leak was the most likely explanation for the emergence of the virus.

Instead, we introduced our coverage of that development on February 28, 2023, by asserting confidently that “the scientific evidence overwhelmingly points to a natural origin for the virus.”

<snip>

". . . But the role and standing of affinity groups, including those outside NPR, were more than that. They became a priority for NPR’s union, SAG-AFTRA—an item in collective bargaining. The current contract, in a section on DEI, requires NPR management to “keep up to date with current language and style guidance from journalism affinity groups” and to inform employees if language differs from the diktats of those groups. In such a case, the dispute could go before the DEI Accountability Committee.

In essence, this means the NPR union, of which I am a dues-paying member, has ensured that advocacy groups are given a seat at the table in determining the terms and vocabulary of our news coverage. . . "



BUT? In Candy's Werld?

8n0zv9.jpg
candycorn

"all things considered," npr is mostly "feature stories." soft voices and non disturbinmg news with a positive spin.

pbs, on the other hand, is a hot bed of radical liberal propaganda, isny it?

1. pbs news hour is the most objective news show this side of c span.

2. "firing line " is one of my favorite shows. ms hoover is pretty bright for a commie rino.

3. i'm sure stalin must have watched nature shows, last night not one of those lion kittens had a mane. are they being "groomed" as vegans?

question : is wm f buckley now considered a "rino?"
 
As for the listenership...the editor is silly to state that NPR has lost the trust. I mean...the right wing will not trust anything that pierces their delicate world view. Not all programming is for all audiences. Its probably that simple.

Uh, they've lost 20% of their listening audience since 2017 when they went all TDS, all the time.
 
Yeah...every other media company has gone gangbusters since 2017, right?
"FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service and has been the number one network in basic cable for the last eight years and the most-watched television news channel for 22 consecutive years, currently attracting nearly 50% of the cable news viewing audience according to Nielsen Media Research"
 
"FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service and has been the number one network in basic cable for the last eight years and the most-watched television news channel for 22 consecutive years, currently attracting nearly 50% of the cable news viewing audience according to Nielsen Media Research"
Was that before or after they were billed nearly a billion dollars for slander?
 

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