You Don't Have to Be a Bigot to Be Called a Racist Anymore

Discussion in 'Race Relations/Racism' started by BookShaka, Sep 16, 2018.

  1. BookShaka
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    BookShaka Silver Member

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    What is a racist? There was a time when the answer to that question was pretty clear-cut. A racist was someone who joined a group like the Ku Klux Klan, spewed racial slurs, or supported segregation. A racist was someone who thought that people of other races were inherently inferior.
    In the last decade or so, that's changed. In a time of expanding definitions, you don't have to be a bigot to be a racist anymore. You just have to have the wrong politics to be branded a racist, or race-baiter or race warrior.
    Or you can just be associated with someone who has the wrong politics.
    The Southern Poverty Law Center has listed David Horowitz, 79, a former 1960s radical turned conservative, as an extremist and "driving force" in the "anti-black" movement.
    On Monday, The Washington Post ran a front-page story that reported that Ron DeSantis, the GOP candidate for governor in Florida, "spoke at racially-charged events" - that is, he spoke at four conferences put on by the David Horowitz Freedom Center.
    What makes Horowitz anti-black? He is "a vocal opponent of reparations for slavery," the Southern Poverty Law Center wrote.
    He also makes provocative statements. Like this one: "Unfortunately, as a nation we have become so trapped in the melodrama of black victimization and white oppression that we are in danger of losing all sense of proportion. If blacks are oppressed in America, why isn't there a black exodus?"
    Horowitz's tone can be insensitive. I think he's dead wrong to dismiss black grievances as melodramatic and I believe he overstates white grievances. He has written things that make me cringe, but I've known him for years and he is no white supremacist. In fact, Horowitz was collaborating with the Black Panthers on a learning center in 1974, when a colleague was murdered; he blamed the group for her death and began to move away from the left.
    Once the SPLC labeled Horowitz as an extremist, he was supposed to become so radioactive that others would associate with him at their own peril. As DeSantis learned. According to The Washington Post, you see, DeSantis not only spoke at Horowitz events, he also "recently was accused of using racially tinged language."
    After he won the GOP primary, DeSantis called his African-American Democratic opponent, Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum "articulate." The Republican also told Fox News that the last thing Floridians need is "to monkey this up by trying to embrace a socialist agenda."
    "Monkey," critics argued, is a racist dog whistle.
    "Articulate" is racist because it can be condescending -- as Sen. Joe Biden, D-Del., learned in 2007 after he praised colleague Barack Obama as the "first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy." Biden apologized. Obama later picked Biden to be his running mate in 2008.
    DeSantis said his "monkey" remark had nothing to do with race. Without proof, one would expect DeSantis to enjoy the benefit of the doubt. Instead he got a front-page story that implied he's a race-baiter because he spoke at conservative confabs.
    Mark Krikorian is executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a pro-enforcement group branded a "hate group" by the SPLC. He sees the SPLC as a left-wing political organization now dedicated to marginalizing ideas that used to be mainstream.
    Politicians like former President Bill Clinton, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and the late Rep. Barbara Jordan, D-Texas, used to support enforcing immigration laws. Today, Krikorian said, their positions would be "branded as hate speech" by the SPLC.
    The SPLC also charged Horowitz with hating Muslims because of his harsh criticism of radical Islamic terrorism and Palestinian groups opposed to Israel.
    As a proof, the SPLC includes this statement, which really is a political argument: "The difference between Islamic fanatics, or Jew haters, and Hitler is that Hitler hid the Final Solution, and the Iranians and Hezbollah shout it from the rooftops. And the whole Muslim world accepts it."
    And here's how you know the SPLC's labeling is highly partisan. In 2016, Richard Cohen, the group's president, wrote a piece titled, "Black Lives Matter is not a hate group."
    "There's no doubt that some protesters who claim the mantle of Black Lives Matter have said offensive things, like the chant, 'pigs in a blanket, fry 'em like bacon' that was heard at one rally," Cohen wrote. "But before we condemn the entire movement for the words of a few, we should ask ourselves whether we would also condemn the entire Republican Party for the racist words of its presumptive nominee -- or for the racist rhetoric of many other politicians in the party over the course of years."
    No, the SPLC would never condemn the entire GOP as racist because of Donald Trump. Better to cook the frog slowly. Start by isolating David Horowitz. Then let the r-word hang over anyone who associates with him. And then see where that goes.

    You Don't Have to Be a Bigot to Be Called a Racist Anymore — RealClearPolitics
     
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  2. harmonica
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    harmonica Gold Member

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    there are many definitions of racist
    basically, you can make up any definition you want
     
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  3. Pilot1
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    Pilot1 VIP Member

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    If you don't parrot the Far Left Progressive, Democrat and Media narrative, you are racist.
     
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  4. Natural Citizen
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    Natural Citizen Gold Member

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    Someone called me a bigot around here a while back. It kind of hurt my feelings, because, you know, I try to only frame my position on the issues in terms of an over-reaching government versus the civil liberties of the electorate or liberty versus tyranny, I suppose is a better way of saying it.

    The most bias entity on planet Earth is the government. They are of the view that they own and control us, own and control all of our wealth and that they set the terms for which we might keep a certain percentage at the barrel of a government gun. And then they turn around and give it to whichever special interest or arbitrary victim status group which they feel needs it most. And the same goes with the Supreme Court, they're extremely biased. It's no wonder everyone is arguing over who gets picked, everyone knows the Judges are biased, that's why they want one who shares their views versus one who does not.

    Gosh. Some people....
     
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    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018
  5. Natural Citizen
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    Natural Citizen Gold Member

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    The Southern Poverty Law Center should be labeled a hate group, I'd add.
     
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  6. IM2
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    IM2 Gold Member

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    The definition of racism has not changed. It has not expanded. It's still the same. What has changed is how racism is expressed. It is not socially acceptable to be a KKK member, so we have white supremacist groups using names like Christian identity, Army of God, etc. Citizens groups. Patriot groups. Militias. Anti govrnmnt, Anti Tax groups, etc. And the way racism is communicated has changed. You can no longer just straight out make racist comments and be deemed acceptable. So what we see is called modern racism.
     
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  7. Pilot1
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    Pilot1 VIP Member

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    Add Black Lives Matter, and ANTIFA to that group.
     
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  8. TroglocratsRdumb
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    TroglocratsRdumb Gold Member

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    The Left derives their power from imflaming cultural tensions.
    The Democrats/MSM/Hollywood work very hard to divide Americans by race, religion,region, gender, class and age.
    It's why the Press is biased on coverage of interracial crimes.
    A Democrat Politician's worst nighmare is racial harmony.
     
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  9. IM2
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    Symbolic racism (also known as modern-symbolic racism, modern racism,[1] symbolic prejudice, and racial resentment) is a coherent belief system that reflects an underlying unidimensional prejudice towards black people in the United States. These beliefs include the stereotype that blacks are morally inferior to white people, and that they violate traditional White American values such as hard work and independence. This is also more of a general term than it is specifically related to prejudice towards black people. It can be more generally characterized as an open dislike and derogation of individuals related to one's self.[clarification needed] These beliefs may cause the subject to discriminate against black people and to justify this discrimination.[2] Some people do not view symbolic racism as prejudice since it is not linked directly to race but indirectly through social and political issues.[3]

    David O. Sears and P.J. Henry characterize symbolic racism as the expression or endorsement of four specific themes or beliefs:[4]

    1. Blacks no longer face much prejudice or discrimination.
    2. The failure of blacks to progress results from their unwillingness to work hard enough.
    3. Blacks are demanding too much too fast.
    4. Blacks have gotten more than they deserve.
    Symbolic racism is a form of modern racism, as it is more subtle and indirect than more overt forms of racism,[5] such as those characterized in Jim Crow laws. As symbolic racism develops through socialization and its processes occur without conscious awareness,[6] an individual with symbolic racist beliefs may genuinely oppose racism and believe they are not racist.[7] Symbolic racism is perhaps the most prevalent racial attitude today.[8]

    In the aftermath of the Civil Rights Movement, old-fashioned (or "Jim Crow") racism dissolved along with segregation in the United States. Some people believe that new forms of racism began to replace old-fashioned racism.[9] Symbolic racism is a term that was coined by David Sears and John McConahay in 1973[10] to explain why most white Americans supported principles of equality for black Americans, but less than half were willing to support programs designed to implement these principles. The original theory described three definitive aspects of symbolic racism:[11][12]

    1. A new form of racism had replaced old-fashioned Jim Crow racism, as it was no longer popular and could no longer be influential in politics as only a small minority still accepted it.
    2. Opposition to black politicians and racially targeted policies is more influenced by symbolic racism than by any perceived or true threat to whites' own personal lives.
    3. The origins of this form of racism lay in early-socialized negative feelings about blacks associated with traditional conservative values.
    The concept of symbolic racism has evolved over time but most writings currently define symbolic racism as containing four themes:[1]

    1. Racial discrimination is no longer a serious obstacle to blacks' prospects for a good life.
    2. Blacks' continuing disadvantages are largely due to their unwillingness to work hard enough.
    3. Blacks' continuing demands are unwarranted.
    4. Blacks' increased advantages are also unwarranted.
    Whitley and Kite cite six underlying factors that contribute to symbolic racism. They are to this day believed to have been some of the biggest influences on modern racism.[6]

    1. Implicitly anti-black affect and negative stereotypes.
    2. Racialized belief in traditional values.
    3. Belief in equality of opportunity.
    4. Low belief in equality of outcome.
    5. Group self-interest.
    6. Low knowledge of black people.
    According to Whitley and Kite, those who hold symbolic racist beliefs tend to hold implicitly negative attitudes, most likely gained in childhood, towards blacks that may or may not be conscious.[6] These attitudes may not be outright hatred, but rather fear, disgust, anger, contempt, etc. In addition, those who hold symbolic racist beliefs may also believe in traditional American values such as hard work, individuality, and self-restraint.[6] However, these beliefs have become racialized. Many perceive that black individuals do not hold or act in accordance with these values.[6] Instead, black individuals rely on public assistance, seek government favors, and act impulsively.[6] As Whitley and Kite note, "The fact that White people also accept public assistance, seek government favors, and act impulsively is not relevant to people with symbolic prejudice; it is their perception (usually in stereotypic terms) of Black people's behavior that they focus on."[6] Furthermore, those with symbolic prejudice tend to believe in the equality of opportunity, which includes access to resources such as education, housing, and employment.[6] However, they tend not to believe in the equality of outcome. This explains how people can support the principle of racial equality but not support initiatives to achieve it, such as affirmative action. Government intervention when individuals do not have the same talent, effort or historical background would violate traditional values of equality of opportunity.[6] Thus, "people can simultaneously endorse equality of opportunity and reject government intervention to bring about equality of outcome."[6] Group self-interest reflects the idea that people try to do what is best for their group.[6] This idea manifests itself in the opinion that whites are deprived as a group of opportunities due to policies intended to benefit blacks. Finally, Whitley and Kite state most whites do not have extensive personal experience with blacks so the negative stereotypes they hold about blacks do not have the opportunity to be dispelled.[6]

    Symbolic racism - Wikipedia
     
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  10. IM2
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    IM2 Gold Member

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    You can't actually do that.
     
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