Wanna Be Smarter? Read A Book That Doesn’t Make Sense

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by proletarian, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. ☭proletarian☭
    Offline

    ☭proletarian☭ Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
  2. midcan5
    Offline

    midcan5 liberal / progressive

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    10,790
    Thanks Received:
    2,367
    Trophy Points:
    245
    Location:
    Philly, PA
    Ratings:
    +3,302
    I'm not sure I could read Kafka again older. Young he was a puzzle, a fascination with the quirkiness of life and fate. I've read most of his work, it has a strange depressed quality to it. Today he would take Zoloft or some other anti depressant and maybe move in a better social circle where his morbid imagination would work better - maybe. I doubt reading him would make you smarter though.

    Franz Kafka online | The Works and Life of Franz Kafka

    "The meaning of life is that it stops." K

    Reading William Vollmann, Richard Powers, Daniel Dennett, Albert Camus, Derrick Jensen, Peter Watson, William Faulkner, or David Foster Wallace may make you smarter though.
     
  3. Baruch Menachem
    Offline

    Baruch Menachem '

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    14,204
    Thanks Received:
    3,235
    Trophy Points:
    185
    Ratings:
    +3,305
    In effect, it is saying that the brain responds to cognitive dissonance by working harder. Makes some kind of sense there. The brain is like any other muscle. The harder it works, the stronger it gets.

    I don't believe that reading kafka is the only way to go. You might get the same result by doing math puzzles and programming exercises.
     
  4. eagleseven
    Offline

    eagleseven Quod Erat Demonstrandum

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    6,518
    Thanks Received:
    1,254
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    OH
    Ratings:
    +1,255
    Does it mean that shitty professors are the best for our brain?
     
  5. Gatekeeper
    Offline

    Gatekeeper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,004
    Thanks Received:
    350
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Ratings:
    +350
    It's out of my expertise, but I don't know if I would call it cognitive dissonance or conflict purely, as much as I would refer to it as cognitive stimulation. Probably a combination. Although any stimulus or 'brain excercises' I would think would assist in the brains ability to delay the neurodegenerative process. The more intense or complex the 'exercise' the more the benefits,makes sense to me also, unless there are underlying medical issues that would prevent this from being beneficial.

    Heck, just being a member in USMB is an abundance of cognitive stimuli per day for anyone! :lol:
     

Share This Page