This Day in US Military History

Discussion in 'Military' started by mhansen2, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. mhansen2
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    30 August

    1780 – General Benedict Arnold betrayed the US when he promised secretly to surrender the fort at West Point to the British army. Arnold whose name has become synonymous with traitor fled to England after the botched conspiracy. His co-conspirator, British spy Major John Andre, was hanged.

    1945 – A proclamation to the German people is signed today formally announcing the establishment of the Allied Control Council and its assumption of supreme authority in Germany.

    1952 - As a pair of Northrop F-89 Scorpions of the 27th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss AFB, New York, perform a flypast, Northrop F-89C-30-NO, 51-5781, disintegrates in flight during a display at the International Aviation Exposition at Detroit-Wayne Major Airport, Detroit, Michigan, killing the Scorpion pilot, Maj. Donald E. Adams, a Korean war jet ace (6.5 kills), radar operator Capt. Kelly, and one spectator. Cause was found to be from severe torsional aeroelastic problems that led to all F-89Cs being grounded and returned to the factory for wing structural redesign.

    1955 – A Vought F7U-3 Cutlass, BuNo 129592, of VF-124, misses all the wires during a landing aboard USS Hancock (CVA-19), operating off of Hawaii, and hits the barrier. "Although reported to have suffered only slight damage, it was struck off charge and never flew again."

    1966 – Test pilot Pete Knight flew the X-15 to 30,541 meters (100,200 feet) and Mach 5.21.

    1984 - A United States Navy North American T-2C Buckeye crashes into the Chesapeake Bay shortly after take-off from NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, killing the student and seriously injuring the instructor.
     
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    31 August

    1803 – Captain Meriwether Lewis left Pittsburgh to meet up with Captain William Clark and begin their trek to the Pacific Ocean.

    1862 - PSS W. B. Terry was a Union stern-wheel transport steamer of 175 tons, used as an armed dispatch boat with two 6-pounder Parrotts. She was built in 1856 at Belle Vernon, Pa.

    On August 21st, 1861 W. B. Terry was captured at Paducah, Ky. by the USS Lexington for trafficking with the Confederacy and flying a Confederate flag.

    She was later captured by the Confederates and used to ferry troops across the Tennessee River.

    On August 31st, 1862, W. B. Terry PSS ran aground 20 feet from shore at the foot of the Duck River Sucks while going up the Tennessee River. She was subsequently stripped of her furniture and burned.

    1863 – Sumter was a Confederate troop transport of 212 tons, built in 1860 at New Albany, Ind.

    In the night of August 31, 1863, while transporting over 600 troops to Charleston, Sumter was accidentally shelled and sunk by Confederate fire from Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg, mistaking her for a Union ship.

    Sumter hit a shoal at the end of Fort Sumter and sank with at least forty killed, one wounded, and eight missing. More than 600 officers and men were saved by barges from Fort Sumter and nearby Confederate gunboats. Most of the Confederate equipment aboard was lost. The wreck was later used as a target practice.

    1865 – The US Federal government estimated the American Civil War had cost about eight-billion dollars. Human costs have been estimated at more than one-million killed or wounded.

    1921 - U.S. Navy airship D-6, A5972, with a C-type envelope built by Goodyear in 1920 and a special enclosed car built by the Naval Aircraft Factory, is destroyed in a Naval Air Station Rockaway hangar gasoline fire along with two small dirigibles, the C-10 and the Goodyear airship H-1, A5973, the sole H-model, a powered two-seat observation balloon built along the lines of the commercial Goodyear "Pony Blimp", and the kite balloon A-P.

    1925 - U.S. Navy Naval Aircraft Factory PN-9, BuNo A-6878, '1', flying boat disappears on a flight from San Francisco to Hawaii with reported loss of crew. The PN-9 was not actually lost, it was just overdue. After staying in the air for 25 hours and covering 1,841 of the 2,400 miles to Pearl Harbor, it landed safely at sea, the crew under command of Commander John Rodgers, Naval Aviator No. 2, rigged sails from fabric from the lower wing and sailed the final 450 miles, reaching Kauai on 10 September. This stood as a seaplane distance flight record for several years. Aircraft is repaired and shipped to San Diego, California.

    1939 – At noon, despite threats of British and French intervention, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler signs an order to attack Poland, and German forces move to the frontier.

    1943 - Boeing B-17F-50-BO Flying Fortress, 42-5451, of the 582d Bomb Squadron, 393d Bomb Group, piloted by James A. McRaven,
    crashes two miles NE of Kearney Army Air Field, Nebraska, during a routine training flight, killing all eight crew. The 393d was reassigned to Kearney AAF from Sioux City AAB, Iowa, this date.

    1945 – General MacArthur establishes the supreme allied command at the main port of Tokyo, as the first foreigner to take charge of Japan in 1000 years.

    1945 – The remaining Japanese troops in the Philippines formally surrender.

    1945 – The Japanese garrison on Marcus Island surrenders to the American Admiral Whiting.

    1949 – Six of the 16 surviving Union veterans of the Civil War attended the last-ever encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic, held in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    1951 – The former enemies of the world war reconvened in San Francisco to finalize negotiations on the peace treaty to formally end WW II.

    1954 - Sole Cessna XL-19B Bird Dog, 52-1804, c/n 22780A, modified with Boeing XT-50-BO-1 210 shp turboprop engine, crashes 2 miles (3.2 km) W of Sedgwick, Kansas.

    1954 – Under terms of the Geneva Agreement, a flow of almost one million refugees from North to South Vietnam begins.

    1955 – Secretary of State John Foster Dulles supports South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem’s position regarding his refusal to hold “national and general elections” to reunify the two Vietnam states. Although these elections were called for by the Geneva Accords of July 1954, Diem and his supporters in the United States realized that if the elections were held, Ho Chi Minh and the more populous north would probably win, thereby reuniting Vietnam under the Communist banner. Accordingly, he refused to hold the elections and the separation of North and South soon became permanent.

    1956 - Fourteenth Lockheed U-2A, 56-6687, Article 354, delivered to the Central Intelligence Agency 27 July 1956. Crashed at Groom Lake, Nevada this date during a night training flight, killing pilot Frank G. Grace, Jr. Pilot became disoriented by lights near the end of the runway and flew into a telephone pole.

    1956 - Boeing WB-50D Superfortress, 49–315, c/n 16091, "The Golden Heart", (built as a B-50D-115-BO), of the 58th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron, out of Eielson AFB, Alaska, crashed early in the morning this date on a sandy island in the Susitna River, 50 miles NW of Anchorage, Alaska, killing all 11 crew. The flight was last heard from at 0302 hrs., local time, when it was over Talkeetna, a check-in station 50 miles N of the ten-mile-long island. The wreckage was found about 5 1/2 hours later by a member of the 71st Air Rescue Squadron. "All that remained when helicopters landed at the crash scene was a smoking pile of rubble."

    1957 – USAF Douglas C-124C Globemaster II, 52-1021, operated by the 1st Strategic Squadron, crashes while on an instrument approach to Biggs Air Force Base in El Paso, Texas, USA, in bad weather after a flight from Hunter AFB near Savannah, Georgia, USA. 5 aircrew are killed, 10 injured.

    1961 – A concrete wall replaced the barbed wire fence that separated East and West Germany, it would be called the Berlin wall.

    1962 – The last two ZPG-3W US Navy airships made a ceremonial last flight over Lakehurst — the base log noted, "This flight terminates operation of non-rigid airships at Lakehurst."

    1963 - At a meeting of the National Security Council, Paul Kattenburg became the first known American official to propose withdrawal from Vietnam. He had traveled to South Vietnam many times on State Department business in the 1950s and early 1960s, and he became convinced that the regime of Ngo Dinh Diem would never survive and that the Vietcong would ultimately prevail. His recommendation was summarily rejected by Dean Rusk and Robert McNamara, and Kattenburg was promptly cut off from the advisory-decision-making process on Vietnam.

    1990 – East & West Germany signed a treaty to reunite legally & politically.

    1991 - A Tomahawk missile launched from a warship in the Gulf of Mexico to recover on a target on the test ranges at Eglin AFB, Florida, misses by ~100 miles, coming down eight miles E of Jackson, Alabama, ~60 miles N of Mobile. "Within minutes of the missile's falling near Jackson, a recovery team arrived by helicopter. Such teams are stationed along the missile's flight path during a test so they can get to a crash scene within 20 minutes no matter where the Tomahawk goes down."

    Cause was found to be two incorrect screws used to assemble a tailfin, said Denny Kline, a Pentagon spokesman for the Navy Cruise Missile Project, on 13 December 1991. A screw, rubbing against an actuator coil disabled one of the missile's two fins. "Somebody during assembly put two screws in, which were moderately too long. Well, in fact, in this case extremely too long because it physically made contact with a coil. It was fine for the first one hour and 21 minutes, but over time it wore away the protective coating and got down to the wound part of the coil and shorted it out," said Kline. As a result, one fin worked properly but the other did not when the missile was to make a pre-planned turn causing it to crash in Alabama. The wrong screws were put in by General Dynamics Corp., said Susan Boyd, Pentagon spokeswoman for the missile program. Four Tomahawks have landed in civilian areas since the Navy began the gulf tests in 1985. There have been no injuries.
     
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    1 September

    1781 – French fleet traps British fleet at Yorktown, VA.

    1807 – Former U.S. vice president Aaron Burr is acquitted of plotting to annex parts of Louisiana and Spanish territory in Mexico to be used toward the establishment of an independent republic. He was acquitted on the grounds that, though he had conspired against the United States, he was not guilty of treason because he had not engaged in an “overt act,” a requirement of the law governing treason.

    1821 – William Becknell led a group of traders from Independence, Mo., toward Santa Fe on what would become the Santa Fe Trail.

    1849 – California Constitutional Convention was held in Monterey.

    1864 - PSS William V. Gillum was a Union side wheel paddle steamer built in 1855 at New Albany, Indiana and was of 70 tons carrying a cargo of lumber from New Orleans to Matamoras, Mexico. She ran aground and was wrecked in the Gulf of Mexico on the 1st September 1864. Officers and crew were rescued by the Mexican schooner Cory.

    1866 – Manuelito, the last Navaho chief, turned himself in at Fort Wingate, New Mexico.

    1930 - Curtiss XF6C-6 racer, A-7147, crashes during the Thompson Trophy race in Chicago, Illinois, killing U.S. Marine Corps pilot Capt. Arthur H. Page. The only military entry, Page gained and increased an early lead but on the 17th of 20 laps, crashed to his death, a victim of carbon monoxide poisoning. The Marine flying field at Parris Island, South Carolina, is named Page Field in his honor.

    1939 – At 0445 hours German forces invade Poland without a declaration of war.

    1941 – U.S. assumes responsibility for trans-Atlantic convoys from Argentia, Canada to the meridian of Iceland. The US Atlantic Fleet announces the formation of the Denmark Strait Patrol. Two heavy cruisers and four destroyers are allocated for to the force. The US Navy is now permitted to escort convoys in the Atlantic containing American merchant vessels.

    1942 – A federal judge in Sacramento, Calif., upheld the wartime detention of Japanese-Americans as well as Japanese nationals.

    1943 - "Great Falls, Mont., Sept. 2. (AP) - Ten crew members of a four-engined bomber from the Great Falls army air base, were killed early today when the ship crashed five miles east of Fort Benton, were identified tonight by Capt. John R. Lloyd, base public relations officer, as follows: Sergeant Robert H. Hall, Coldwater, Mich.; Sergeant John T. Huff, Cherokee, Kan.; Sergeant Carl E. Lower, Van Wert, Ohio; Sergeant Chester W. Peko, Throop, Pa.; Private First Class Paul Peterson, Colfax, Wis.; Sergeant Curio C. Thrementi, Vassar, Mich.; Lieutenant Harold L. Wonders, Waterloo, Iowa; Lieutenant Warren H. Maginn, Glendale, Los Angeles; Lieutenant Jack Y. Fisk, Los Angeles, and Lieutenant Arnold J. Gardiner, New York. The crash occurred during a routine training flight." Boeing B-17F-35-BO Flying Fortress, 42-5128, of the 612th Bomb Squadron, 401st Bomb Group, was flown by Lt. Maginn.

    1945 – Americans received word of Japan’s formal surrender that ended World War II. Because of the time difference, it was Sept. 2 in Tokyo Bay, where the ceremony took place.

    1950 – US Air Force Captain Iven C. Kincheloe, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing, claimed his fifth air-to-air victory in his F-86 Sabre “Ivan” to become the 10th ace of the Korean War. Kincheloe accounted for four MiGs in six days.

    1951 – At the Presidio in San Francisco, the US, Australia, and New Zealand signed the ANZUS Pact, a joint security alliance to govern their relations.

    1952 - Several tornados sweep across Carswell AFB, Texas destroying Convair B-36B Peacemaker, 44-92051, and damaging 82 others of the 11th Bomb Group, 7th Bomb Wing, including ten at the Convair plant on the other side of the Fort Worth base. Gen. Curtis LeMay is forced to remove the 19th Air Division from the war plan, and the base went on an 84-hour work week until repairs were made. 26 B-36s were returned to Convair for repairs, and the last aircraft deemed repairable was airborne again on 11 May 1953.

    1961 – The Soviet Union ended a moratorium on atomic testing with an above-ground nuclear explosion in central Asia.

    1970 - A Vought F-8J Crusader, BuNo 150329, of VF-24 suffers ramp strike on the USS Hancock (CVA-19) and explodes during night carrier qualifications, killing Lt. Darrell N. Eggert.

    1974 – The SR-71 Blackbird sets (and holds) the record for flying from New York to London in the time of 1 hour, 54 minutes and 56.4 seconds at a speed of 1,435.587 miles per hour (2,310.353 km/h).

    1974 - The Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk company demonstrator N671SA crashed while attempting to recover from a roll at too low an altitude during its display at the Farnborough Air Show, United Kingdom, killing its two crew.

    1982 – The United States Air Force Space Command is established.

    1983 – A Korean Air Lines Boeing 747-230B (HL-7442, flight 007), was shot down over Sakhalin Island by AA-3 Anab missiles fired by a Soviet Su-15 Flagon piloted by Gennadi N. Osipovich. The aircraft was off-course, likely due to a navigation error and had already overflown the Kamchatka Pennisula. All 23 crew and 246 passengers (including US Congressman Lawrence McDonald from Georgia) were killed.

    1985 - A U.S. Navy Boeing Vertol CH-46D Sea Knight, BuNo 151918, '72', crashed on takeoff due to an engine failure aboard the destroyer USS Fife (DD-991) in the Indian Ocean. The helicopter struck the Sea Sparrow launcher. Quick response of Fife´s damage control team extinguished the fires and secured the helicopter which was hanging from the side of the destroyer below the helicopter deck. All 16 crew and passengers aboard escaped without major injuries. The helicopter was assigned to Helicopter Combat Support Squadron 11 (HC-11) Det. 6 aboard the combat stores ship USS Mars (AFS-1).

    2012 - A USMC McDonnell Douglas F/A-18C Hornet crashed in a remote range area of the Fallon Range Training Complex. The pilot ejected from the aircraft safely.

    2014 - A United States Marine Corps Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopter crashed in the Gulf of Aden whilst attempting to land on USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19). All 25 people on board were rescued.
     
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    2 September

    1789 – Although the United States Treasury Department was founded on September 2, 1789, its roots can be traced back to the American Revolution.

    1859 – The solar storm of 1859 (also known as the Carrington Event) affects electrical telegraph service.

    1862 - PSS Gypsy was a Union stern wheel paddle steamer of 113 tons. She ran aground and was wrecked in the Sacramento River, 20 miles south of Sacramento, California.

    1863 - SS Rinaldo was a Confederate small steamer that was captured by the Union 17th Wis. Infantry Regiment under Col. A. G. Malloy and burned on September 2nd, 1863, at Trinity, Louisiana.

    1864 - SS Scioto was a Union screw steamer of 389 tons, built in 1848 at Huron, Ohio that collided with the CSS Arctic on September 2nd, 1864 and sank at Dunkirk, New York.

    1940 – Following the agreement made in July and later detailed negotiations, a deal is now ratified between Britain and the USA by which Britain gets 50 old destroyers, veterans of World War I, but desperately needed for escort work, in return for bases granted to the United States in the West Indies and Bermuda.

    1943 - "Sioux City, Iowa, Sept. 3. (AP) - All 10 crew members of an army bomber from the Sioux City air base were killed when their plane crashed five miles from the base last night while on a routine training flight. The dead included Second Lieutenant Earl G. Adkinson, Portland, Ore., and Sergeant Robert Hunter, Eufaula, Okla." Consolidated B-24E-25-FO Liberator, 42-7237, c/n 261, of the 703d Bomb Squadron, 445th Bomb Group, flown by Lt. "Atkinson", according to the crash report, crashed one mile E of the base.

    1943 - Boeing B-17F-40-VE Flying Fortress, 42-5977, of the 540th Bomb Squadron (Heavy), 383d Bomb Group (Heavy), Geiger Field, Washington, on a routine local flight with three aboard, piloted by Robert P. Ferguson, clips the tops of trees for several blocks, crashes into scrub pines two miles S of Geiger Field and burns. Only three were on the bomber, said a report by Lt. R. E. Reed, public relations officer at the field. Names were withheld pending notification of next of kin.

    1944 – Navy pilot George Herbert Walker Bush was shot down by Japanese forces as he completed a bombing run over the Bonin Islands. Bush was rescued by the crew of USS Finback (SS-230); his two crew members, however, died.

    1945 – Aboard the USS Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan formally surrenders to the Allies, bringing an end to World War II.

    1945 – Hours after Japan’s surrender, Ho Chi Minh declares the independence of Vietnam from France.

    The proclamation paraphrased the U.S. Declaration of Independence in declaring, “All men are born equal: the Creator has given us inviolable rights, life, liberty, and happiness!” and was cheered by an enormous crowd gathered in Hanoi’s Ba Dinh Square. It would be 30 years, however, before Ho’s dream of a united Vietnam became reality.

    1945 - "The Navy and the Marine Corps last night (7 September) disclosed that a Marine lieutenant flying a Hellcat pursuit plane has been missing in the Mojave Desert since Sunday. Daily searches by Army, Navy and Marine planes have yielded no trace of the missing ship or its pilot, First Lt. Herbert L. Libbey of Tomaston, [sic] Maine. Lieutenant Libbey left Las Vegas, Nev., at 4:15 p.m. Sunday en route to the Marine Corps air base at Mojave. He was last seen flying over Searles Lake, near Trona. -The country between Searles lake and Mojave is sparsely inhabited and includes large tracts not reached by roads or trails. Persons with any clues to the whereabouts of the plane or pilot have been asked to telephone Mojave 140 collect; or Franklin 7321 at San Diego. The military search for Lieutenant Libbey has been carried out over a constantly-widening territory, much of it far off of the supposed line of flight. The Navy public information office of the eleventh naval district at San Diego indicated that points as far distant as the Inyo and Colorado deserts and various desert mountain ranges were being searched. No ground hunt has been made." Lt. Libbey had flown F6Fs with VMF-124 from USS Essex (CV-9). F6F-5, BuNo 71033, of VMF-255, wreck found 13 June 1957. 1st Lt. Herbert Lee Libbey lost his life when he crashed 20 miles N of Wildrose Ranger Station in the Panamint mountains.

    1958 - A US Air Force C-130A Hercules (60-528) of the 7406 CSS, flying from Adana Turkey, was shot down near Sasnashen, Soviet Armenia, about 55 kilometers northwest of the Armenian capital of Yerevan by Soviet MiG-17 Fresco pilots Gavrilov, Ivanov, Kucheryaev and Viktor Lopatkov. The C-130 was a Sun Valley SIGINT aircraft. The remains of John E. Simpson, Rudy J. Swiestra, Edward J. Jeruss and Ricardo M. Vallareal were returned to the US on September 24, 1958. The remains of the other crew members, Paul E. Duncan, George P. Petrochilos, Arthur L. Mello, Leroy Price, Robert J. Oshinskie, Archie T. Bourg Jr., James E. Fergueson, Joel H. Fields, Harold T. Kamps, Gerald C. Maggiacomo, Clement O. Mankins, Gerald H. Medeiros and Robert H. Moore were recovered in 1998.

    1965 – Test pilot John McKay flew the X-15 to 73,091 meters (239,812 feet) and Mach 5.16.

    1966 - A U.S. Navy Grumman F-11A Tiger, BuNo 141764, of the Blue Angels aerobatic team, Blue Angel 5, crashes on the shore of Lake Ontario during the International Air Exhibition at Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The pilot, Lieutenant Commander Richard "Dick" Oliver, 31 years old, of Fort Mill, South Carolina, is killed. Coming out of a knife edge pass, followed by a roll, 5 contacts the lake surface at ~500 mph and literally skis across the surface, striking a six-foot high sheet steel piling retaining wall on the edge of Toronto Island Airport and disintegrating. Wreckage (turbine) is thrown as far as 3,483.6 feet from point of initial impact.

    1987 - A Schweizer RG-8A, 85-0048, c/n 4, ex-civil registration N3623C, modified Schweizer SGS 2-32 motor glider for U.S. Army Grisly Hunter reconnaissance project. Crashed at Ft. Huachuca, Arizona, killing the two-man crew.

    1991 – President Bush formally recognized the independence of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.

    1993 – The United States and Russia formally ended decades of competition in space by agreeing to a joint venture to build a space station.

    1996 – The US launched cruise missiles at selected air defense targets in Iraq to discourage Sadam Hussein’s military moves against a Kurd faction.

    2004 – Former YTLX-318 was a US Navy tug that was used as a target 750nm SE of Hilo, Hawaii.

    2015 - A U.S. Army Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter from Fort Carson Army base crashes during a training mission in a wooded area of Douglas County, Colorado. All four people aboard are rescued and transported for medical treatment.
     
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    3 September

    1609 – Henry Hudson discovered the island of Manhattan.

    1752 – The Gregorian Adjustment to the calendar was put into effect in Great Britain and the American colonies followed. At this point in time 11 days needed to be accounted for and Sept. 2 was selected to be followed by Sept. 14. People rioted thinking the government stole 11 days of their lives.

    1777 – The American flag is flown in battle for the first time, during a Revolutionary War skirmish at Cooch’s Bridge, Maryland.

    1782 – As a token of gratitude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives 74-gun ship-of-the-line America (first ship-of-the-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost in Boston.

    1783 – The Treaty of Paris between the United States and Great Britain officially ended the Revolutionary War.

    1864 - SS Gillum a Union cargo ship, was on a voyage from New Orleans to Matamoros, Mexico, when wrecked at Sabine Pass, Port Arthur, Texas. The crew was rescued by USS Circassian and schooner Cora.

    1826 – Sloop-of-war USS Vincennes left NY to become the first US Navy warship to circumnavigate the globe.

    1908 – Orville Wright began two weeks of flight trials that impressed onlookers with his complete control of his new Type A Military Flyer. In addition to setting an altitude record of 310 feet and an endurance record of more than one hour, he had carried aloft the first military observer, Lieutenant Frank Lahm.

    1925 - U.S. Navy airship, USS Shenandoah (ZR-1), crashed after encountering thunderstorms near Ava, Ohio after an in-flight break up due to “cloud suck” about 0445 hrs. Fourteen of 43 aboard are killed. The ship's commanding officer, Lt. Cdr. Zachery Lansdowne is killed on what was to have been his final flight before reassignment to sea duty.

    1934 – A Fokker Y1O-27, 31-599, of the 12th Observation Squadron, Brooks Field, Texas, crashes 5 miles W of Danville, Louisiana, which community is four miles W of Hodge, after starboard engine loses power. Pilot Cadet Neil M. Caldwell and passenger Pvt. Betz Baker die in crash and fire, passenger Pvt. Virgil K. Martin, riding in rear cockpit, survives with minor injuries. This aircraft has previously ditched in San Diego Bay, California on 16 December 1932.

    1939 – In response to Hitler’s invasion of Poland, Britain and France, both allies of the overrun nation declare war on Germany.

    1943 – Italy surrendered. The Allied invasion of Italy begins on the same day that U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio sign the Armistice of Cassibile aboard the Royal Navy battleship HMS Nelson off Malta.

    1944 – First combat employment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when a Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James M. Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island.

    1945 – General Tomoyuki Yamashita, the Japanese commander of the Philippines, surrendered to Lieutenant General Jonathan Wainwright at Baguio.

    1945 – Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162).

    1948 - The only Silverplate Boeing B-29 Superfortress to be part of the strike package on both atomic missions over Japan, Boeing B-29-40-MO Superfortress, 44-27353, "The Great Artiste", of the 509th Composite Group, deployed to Goose Bay Air Base, Labrador for polar navigation training, aborts routine training flight due to an engine problem, makes downwind landing, touches down halfway down runway, overruns onto unfinished extension, ground loops to avoid tractor. Structural damage at wing joint so severe that Superfortress never flies again. Despite historic significance, airframe is scrapped at Goose Bay in September 1949.

    1954 – U-505 begins its move from a specially constructed dock to its final site at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry.

    1954 – The US Espionage & Sabotage Act of 1954 signed.

    1964 – Test pilot Milton Thompson flew the X-15 to 23,957 meters (78,600 feet) and Mach 5.35.

    1975 - A USAF Boeing B-52G Stratofortress, 57-6493, of the 68th Bomb Wing, Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina, crashed near Aiken, South Carolina, when the aircraft suffered major structural failure due to a major fuel leak with the right wing separating between the third and fourth engine nacelles, the wing then shearing off the horizontal stabilizer. The bomber rolled inverted and broke apart.

    Witnesses described it as a "ball of fire" which then plunged into a wooded area. Wreckage was spread over a 10-mile area. Four crewmembers successfully ejected, three KWF. The aircraft was on a routine training mission and was carrying no weapons. The Federal Aviation Administration, which was monitoring the flight, said the bomber was last reported flying at an altitude of 28,000 feet. Killed were 1st Lt. Grady E. Rudolph, 26, of Lafayette, Indiana; 1st Lt. Melvin E. Bewley, Jr., 25, of Birmingham, Alabama; and Sgt. Ricky K. Griffith, 21, of Cedarville, New Jersey. Survivors were Capt. James A. Perry, 29, of Princeton, West Virginia; Capt. Donnell Exum, 27, Smithfield, North Carolina; Capt. Gregory A. Watts, 27, Morganton, North Carolina; and 2d Lt. Hector M. Marquez, 24, Brownsville, Texas. The four survivors were reported in good condition at the Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia. The Department of Defense said that 67 B-52s have crashed, including 17 in the Vietnam War.

    1979 - Two Convair F-106 Delta Darts of the 186th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 120th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Montana Air National Guard, out of Great Falls Airport, perform a pair of a flyovers in Dillon, Montana in conjunction with the town's Labor Day parade.

    One Delta Dart, F-106A-70-CO, 57-2458, c/n 8-24-41, piloted by Capt. Joel Rude, clips a grain elevator with its port wing. The pilot unsuccessfully attempts to eject and is killed. Forty others are injured by debris and fire but Capt. Rude is the only fatality. On 7 September 2009, a commemorative plaque is dedicated in Dillon in the pilot's memory.
     
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    4 September

    1781 – Mexican Provincial Governor, Felipe de Neve, founded Los Angeles.

    1807 – Robert Fulton began operating his steamboat.

    1861 - SV Colonel Long was a Confederate fishing schooner of 14 tons with a crew of eight. She was carrying a cargo of one barrel of whiskey and a few bags of arrowroot and a bag of sponges. She was captured by the USS Jamestown and scuttled off the Georgia coast.

    1882 – Thomas Edison displayed the first practical electrical lighting system. He successfully turned on the lights in a one square mile area of New York City with the world’s 1st electricity generating plant.

    1886 – Geronimo, the wiliest and most dangerous Apache warrior of his time, finally surrenders to General Nelson A. Miles in Skeleton Canyon, Arizona.

    1888 – George Eastman received patent #388,850 for his roll-film camera and registered his trademark: “Kodak.” George Eastman introduced the box camera.

    1913 - U.S. Army 11th Cavalry 1st Lt. Moss Lee Love becomes the 10th fatality in U.S. army aviation history when his Wright Model C biplane crashes near San Diego, California during practice for his Military Aviator Test. On 19 October 1917, the newly-opened Dallas Love Field in Dallas, Texas is named in his honor. Joe Baugher lists the fatal aircraft accident for this date as being Burgess Model J, Signal Corps 18, which dove into the ground killing its pilot.

    1923 - Maiden flight of the first U.S. airship, the USS Shenandoah (ZR-1).

    1941 - USS Greer (DD-145) is the first United States Navy ship fired on in World War 2.
    USS Greer (DD-145) - Wikipedia
    Some sources date the event in 1940.

    1943 - All eight crew of Consolidated B-24E-25-CF Liberator, 41-29071, of the 701st Bomb Squadron, 445th Bomb Group, Sioux City Army Air Base, Iowa, piloted by Jack D. Hodges, are killed when the bomber crashes in a corn field four miles SW of Moville, Iowa.

    1945 – Some 2,200 Japanese soldiers finally lay down their arms-on Wake Island.

    1945 – The Coast Guard Cutter USCG 83434 became the first and only cutter to host an official surrender ceremony when Imperial Japanese Army Second Lieutenant Kinichi Yamada surrendered the garrison of Aguijan Island on board this Coast Guard 83-footer. Rear Admiral Marshall R. Greer, USN, accepted the surrender for the United States.

    1946 - First prototype Bell XP-83, 44-84990, bailed back to Bell Aircraft Company by the USAAF as a ramjet testbed, and modified with an engineer's station in the fuselage in lieu of the rear fuel tank and pylon for test ramjet under starboard wing, suffers fire in ramjet on flight out of Niagara Falls Airport, New York. Flames spread to wing, forcing Bell test pilot "Slick" Goodlin and engineer Charles Fay to bail out, twin-jet fighter impacting at ~1020 hrs. on farm in Amhurst, New York, ~13 miles from Niagara Airport, creating ~25 foot crater.

    1946 - USAT David Caldwell was a liberty ship owned at the time of loss by the US War Shipping Administration. Passing through Hampton Roads, Virginia, she went aground during a storm and broke in two.

    1947 – Test pilot Chuck Yeager flew the XS-1 on a telemetry test flight to Mach 0.89. There was a telemetry failure and the flight had to be repeated.

    1948 - A U.S. Navy Vought F4U Corsair fighter from Naval Air Station New York crashes into a four-family home at 39–29 212th Street, Queens, New York, killing the pilot, 1st Lt. Roger Olsen, USMCR, 25, of New Rochelle, New York, and three civilian women, Mrs. Helen Raynor, Mrs Alice Cressmer, and Miss Louise Paul. The pilot, a 1943 Pensacola graduate, was on the first day of a two-week reserve training course.

    1950 – The 1st helicopter rescue of American pilot behind enemy lines.
    First Helicopter Rescue ‹ HistoricWings.com :: A Magazine for Aviators, Pilots and Adventurers

    1950 - A US Navy F4U-4B Corsair of VF-53, piloted by Ensign Edward V. Laney, shot down a Soviet Naval Aviation Douglas A-20 Box over the Yellow Sea, southeast of the Soviet occupied Port Arthur Naval Base in China and west of the North Korean coast. Laney was one of a four-ship Combat Air Patrol from USS Valley Forge (CV-45), part of Task Force 77, which was protecting US Navy air activity against North Korea not long before the Inchon landings. The A-20 was one of two belonging to the Port Arthur-based 36th Mine-Torpedo Aviation Regiment of the Red Banner Pacific Fleet, apparently sent out on an armed reconnaissance mission.

    A-20s had been supplied in quantity to the Soviets on Lend-Lease during World War 2, and this unit had had extensive experience during the war as torpedo bombers. The Corsairs encountered the two A-20s about 40 nautical miles from the Chinese coast. One A-20 turned back, but the other pressed on.

    As the Corsairs descended, the top turret gunner on the A-20 was observed to open fire. Richard E. Downs led Laney on a firing pass, and Laney hit the A-20 with his 20mm cannon. The Soviet aircraft then crashed into the sea. The US recovered the body of one Soviet crewman, lateridentified as that of Genaddiy Mishin, the copilot. The other two bodies, those of Senior Lt. Karpol, the aircraft commander, and Sgt. A. Makaganov, the gunner, were never found. Mishin's body was returned to the Soviets in 1956.

    1954 -A US Navy P2V-5 of VP-19, operating from NAS Atsugi Japan was attacked 40 miles off the coast of Siberia by two Soviet MiG-15 Fagots. The aircraft ditched and one crew member, Roger H. Reid was lost. The other crew members, John B. Wayne, John C. Fischer, William A. Bedard, Frank E. Petty, Anthony P. Granera, Texas R. Stone, Paul R. Mulmollem, Ernest L. Pinkevich and David A. Atwell were rescued by a US Air Force SA-16 Albatross.

    1954 – Icebreakers, USS Burton Island (AGB-1) and USCG Northwind (WAGB-282), complete first transit of Northwest passage through McClure Strait. They are accompanied by Canadian HMCS Labrador (AW 50).

    1957 - Douglas C-124A Globemaster II, 51-5173, c/n 43583, en route from Larson AFB, Washington, crashed while attempting a landing at Binghamton Airport, Binghamton, New York. On final approach, just before touchdown, the airplane struck an embankment and crashed on the runway. The plane was delivering 20 tons of equipment for Link Aviation. The crew of 9 survived.

    1958 - USS Makassar Strait (CVE-91) was sunk as a target off San Nicholas Island, California.

    1969 – Radio Hanoi announces the death of Ho Chi Minh, proclaiming that the National Liberation Front will halt military operations in the South for three days, September 8-11, in mourning for Ho.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
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    1664 – After days of negotiation, the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam surrendered to the British, who would rename it New York. The citizens of New Amsterdam petitioned Peter Stuyvesant to surrender to the English.

    1774 – In response to the British Parliament’s enactment of the Coercive Acts in the American colonies, the first session of the Continental Congress convenes at Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia.

    1781 – The Battle of the Chesapeake; a British fleet arrived off the Virginia Capes and found 26 French warships in three straggling lines.

    1804 – In a daring night raid, American sailors under Lieutenant Stephen Decatur, boarded the captured USS Philadelphia and burned the ship to keep it out of the hands of the Barbary pirates who captured her.

    1813 – Schooner USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, ME.

    1836 – Sam Houston was elected president of the Republic of Texas.

    1850 - USS Yorktown was a 16-gun sloop laid down in 1838 in the Norfolk Navy Yard. And commission in 1840. While on anti-slaving duties, she struck an uncharted reef off Maio, Cape Verde. Although the ship broke up in a very short time, not a life was lost in the wreck.

    1863 – United States Foreign Minister to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, sends an angry letter to the British government warning that war between the two nations may erupt if it allows two powerful ironclad ships, designed to help the Confederates break the Union naval blockade, to set sail.

    1877 – Oglala Sioux chief Crazy Horse is fatally bayoneted by a U.S. soldier after resisting confinement in a guardhouse at Fort Robinson, Nebraska.

    1905 – The Russo-Japanese War comes to an end as representatives of the two nations sign the Treaty of Portsmouth in New Hampshire.

    1918 – USS Mount Vernon (ID-4508) was torpedoed by U-82 off France, but was able to make port.

    1923 – U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake.

    1923 – Former USS Virginia (BB-13) and USS New Jersey (BB-16) were towed to a point three miles off the Diamond Shoals lightship, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, anchored there and sunk as targets by US Army horizontal bombers.

    1939 – The United States proclaimed its neutrality in World War II.

    1944 – Germany launched its first V-2 missile at Paris, France.

    1945 – Iva Toguri D’Aquino, a Japanese-American suspected of being wartime radio propagandist “Tokyo Rose,” was arrested in Yokohama.

    1951 – Test pilot Scott Crossfield flew the X-1 to Mach 1.07 in fuselage pressure and stabilizer tests.

    1953 – The 1st privately operated atomic reactor opened in Raleigh NC.

    1953 - "TOKYO (AP) - Wild mountain country in Western Japan Saturday cloaked the fate of a U.S. jet pilot, one of six forced to crash or bail out when a sudden violent storm hid their bases until their jets ran out of fuel. The pilot unaccounted for was flying one of five F-86 Sabres Friday from Kisarazu maintenance base on the east side of Tokyo Bay to Tsuiki Air Base at Fukuoka, Kyushu's principal city.

    Two crash-landed at or near Tsuiki. One pilot parachuted into the Pacific off Shikoku Island and was rescued by a fisherman. Another parachuted on a housetop. The fifth pilot disappeared in an area somewhat resembling America's mountainous Olympic Peninsula country. At the same time that tragedy beset the Sabres, an F-84 Thunderjet crash-landed near Itazuke Air Base near Fukuoka. The jet crashed into a barn, injuring the pilot. No names were released."

    1963 - A North American AF-1E Fury, BuNo 143560, of VF-725, Naval Reserve, based at NAS Glenview, Illinois, suffers engine failure, pilot Lt. Don J. "Skip" Mellem ejects through canopy and survives.

    1967 – Former USS Jack (SS-259) was loaned to the Greek Navy and renamed Amphitrite. Returned to the US Navy, she was sunk as a target.

    1969 – Lt. William Calley is charged with six specifications of premeditated murder in the death of 109 Vietnamese civilians at My Lai in March 1968.

    1975 – In Sacramento, California, an assassination attempt against President Gerald Ford is foiled when a Secret Service agent wrests a semi-automatic .45-caliber pistol from Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, a follower of incarcerated cult leader Charles Manson.

    1978 – US Pres. Carter, Menachem Begin of Israel and Anwar Sadat of Egypt met at Camp David, Md.

    1990 – USS Acadia (AD-42) departs San Diego for first war-time deployment of male-female crew on combat vessel.
     
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    1492 – Columbus’ fleet sailed from Gomera, Canary islands, his final port of call before crossing the Atlantic Ocean for the first time.

    1620 – The Pilgrims sail from Plymouth, England, on the Mayflower to settle in North America.

    1628 – Puritans settle Salem, which will later become part of Massachusetts Bay Colony.

    1776 – The Turtle, the 1st submarine invented by David Bushnell, attempted to secure a cask of gunpowder to the HMS Eagle, flagship of the British fleet, in the Bay of NY but got entangled with the Eagle’s rudder bar, lost ballast and surfaced before the charge was planted.

    1862 – USS Picket was a Union army screw steam gunboat, converted from an iron barge. She was hit by shells and exploded in the Tar River at Washington, N.C. Capt. Sylvester D. Nicoll and 19 men were killed. The ordnance and machinery were removed and the vessel was burned. The wreck was discovered by local divers in 1973. The iron hull is intact.

    1901 – President William McKinley is shot at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York. McKinley was greeting the crowd in the Temple of Music when Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, stepped forward and shot the president twice at point-blank range. McKinley lived for another week before finally succumbing to a gangrene infection on September 14.

    1915 – The first tank prototype was completed and given its first test drive on this day, developed by William Foster & Company for the British army. Several European nations had been working on the development of a shielded, tracked vehicle that could cross the uneven terrain of World War I trenches, but Great Britain was the first to succeed.

    1918 – Sailors fire the first of 5 14”-50 caliber railroad guns at Tergnier, a German rail head in the Comeigne Forest.

    1944 - First prototype (and only one completed) McDonnell XP-67 “Moonbat,” 42-11677, suffers fire in starboard engine during functional test flight at 10,000 feet (3,000 m). Pilot E.E. Elliot manages to bring stricken airframe into Lambert Field, St. Louis, Missouri, flames gut the fuselage, engine nacelle and wheelwell before firefighters halt blaze. As jet engined project that will become the FD-1 Phantom is already on the horizon, project is cancelled.

    1947 – “Operation Sandy,” the launching of a V-2 rocket from the flight deck of USS Midway (CVB-41). The rocket’s flight path was erratic right from launch and it exploded at about 12,000 feet. Three main pieces fell into the ocean some 5,000 yards from the ship.

    1953 – The last American and Korean prisoners were exchanged in Operation Big Switch, the last official act of the Korean War.

    1960 - A North American GAM-77 Hound Dog missile launched from a Boeing B-52 Stratofortress over the Eglin Air Force Base, Florida test range at ~2 p.m. goes astray, coming down on a farm near Samson, Alabama. The missile ignored repeated attempts by the range safety officer to self-destruct.

    1963 – Former USS Balao (SS-285) was sunk as a target off Florida.

    1966 – Former USS Foss (DE-59) was sunk as a target off California near San Diego by USS Sabalo (SS-302).

    1976 – Soviet Air Force Lt. Viktor Belenko lands his MIG-25P Foxbat in Japan and asks for asylum in the United States.

    1981 - A United States Air Force Northrop T-38A-75-NO Talon, 68-8182, '1', of the Thunderbirds display team crashed on take-off at Cleveland, Ohio, United States following a bird strike. The team leader, Lt. Col. David L. Smith, was killed and the team’s displays for the rest of the year are cancelled.
     
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    Poster’s note: I’m noticing more errors in my primary source

    This Day in U.S. Military History

    I’m cutting back on this thread.

    1918 - "By Associated Press to THE SUN - MATHER FIELD, Sacramento, Cal., Sept. 7. - Flying Cadets William G. Wilson, of Berkeley, California, and a son of J. Stitt Wilson, at one time a candidate for the socialist party for governor of California, and James H. Wilson of Pueblo, Colorado, met death today when their airplanes collided in the air. The accident occurred at the south end of the field. The three were not related. Civilians who witnessed the collision said the airplanes came together head on. One of the airplanes tumbled downward and crashed to the earth, while the other seemed to be descending for a landing, witnesses said. William G. Wilson was killed instantly. He suffered a fractured skull and internal injuries. James E. Wilson was removed to the base hospital where he died about 25 minutes after the accident. He suffered internal injuries and his thigh was injured. The bodies of the two cadets were taken to an undertaking establishment in Sacramento where they will remain pending instructions from the relatives. They were draped with American flags. The cadets were flying at an altitude of about 3,500 feet when the airplanes came together. The accident occurred near Walsh station, a short distance from the southern end of the field. The wrecked airplanes fell to earth at points about a half mile apart." Curtiss JN-4Ds AS-3673 and AS-3995 written off in this accident.

    1930 - Capt. John Owen Donaldson, World War I ace (eight victories), after winning two races at an American Legion air meet in Philadelphia, is killed when his plane crashes during a stunt flying performance. He had shared the MacKay Gold Medal for taking first place in the Army's transcontinental air race in October 1919. Greenville Army Air Field, South Carolina, is later renamed Donaldson Air Force Base for the Greenville native.

    1945 - "SAN DIEGO, Sept. 7, (UP) - A stunting naval fighter plane today struck a power line, crashed through a garage and slashed off a corner of a house in the east San Diego district, police reported. The pilot was killed instantly."

    1956 – Test pilot Iven Kincheloe flew the X-2 to 39,491 meters (129,570 feet) and Mach 1.7.

    1966 - Second (of five) Ling-Temco-Vought XC-142As, 62-5922, suffers failure of idler gear in number three engine gearbox during a preflight run-up at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Entire gearbox has to be replaced. Investigation reveals problem with inadequately supported aluminum pin that serves as an axle for this gear, making misalignment and eventual failure inevitable, so a fix is designed and the starboard gearboxes of all XC-142s are modified.

    2007 - A Sikorsky MH-53M Pave Low IV, 69-05794, of the 20th Special Operations Squadron, Hurlburt Field, crashes near Duke Field, Eglin Auxiliary Field 3, two are injured.
     
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    1923 – Honda Point Disaster involving:
    USS Chauncey (DD-296)
    USS Delphy (DD-261)
    USS Fuller (DD-297)
    USS Nicholas (DD-311)
    USS S. P. Lee (DD-310)
    USS Woodbury (DD-309)
    USS Young (DD-312)
    A Naval Tragedy's Chain of Errors | U.S. Naval Institute

    1944 - 2d Lt. John T. McCarthy, in Republic P-47D-6-RE Thunderbolt, 42-74782, of the 262d FPTS, on a combined interception training mission out of Bruning Army Air Field, Nebraska, at ~1540 hrs. CWT, at 16,000 feet altitude, makes a pursuit curve mock attack from the high port side of Boeing B-17G-35-DL Flying Fortress, 42-107159, terminating his attack from about 250 to 300 yards away from the bomber, but "mushes" into the B-17 while breaking away, hitting the port wing near the number one (port outer) engine. "Both planes burst into flames immediately, the B-17 exploding, disintegrating into several pieces, and crashing to the ground. The P-47 hit the ground in a tight spiral, exploding when it hit the ground." The collision occurs ~5 miles NE of Bruning AAF. The fighter pilot is KWF.

    The B-17, of the 224th AAF Base Unit, out of Sioux City Army Air Base, Iowa, was part of a formation of bombers on a camera-gunnery mission, en route to Bruning AAF, which was flying in several elements. The fighter struck the wing man of the second element of the low formation. Only four crew of ten aboard the B-17 manage to bail out. Killed are 2d Lts. William F. Washburn, and Bernard I. Hall, pilot and co-pilot, F/O George A. Budovsky, Cpl. John E. Tuchols, and Pvt. Henry C. Sedberry. Surviving are Cpls. LeNoir A. Greer (minor injuries), and Walter A. Divan (major injuries), Pvt. Albert L. Mikels (minor injuries), and Pfc. Reuben L. Larson (minor injuries). "It is the opinion of the Aircraft Accident Investigating Committee that responsibility for the accident is 100% pilot error on the part of the pilot of the P-47, in that poor judgement and poor technique was used in 'breaking off'." A Nebraska historical marker for the accident was erected in 2010 by the Milligan Memorial Committee for the World War II Fatal Air Crashes near Milligan, Nebraska.

    1958 - Two Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bombers collide over the town of Airway Heights near Fairchild AFB, Washington. B-52D, 56–661 and 56–681, both crash. Thirteen crew members are killed, while three survive. There were no casualties on the ground.

    1960 - USAF Boeing WB-50D Superfortress crashes and burns in mountains six miles E of Ishikawa, Japan, early Thursday, killing at least nine of eleven on board instantly. Townspeople who hear the weather plane crash are foiled at rescue attempts by searing heat. Nine charred bodies are pulled from the wreckage. The plane, on a routine weather mission, had been aloft from Yokota Air Base for about an hour. B-50D-105-BO, 48-122, converted to WB-50D. Crashed with 56th WRS.

    1966 – Test pilot John McKay flew the X-15 to 22,311 meters (73,202 feet) and Mach 2.44.

    1970 - US Marine Corps Capt. Patrick G. Carroll, 27, of El Toro, California, ejects safely Tuesday moments before his Douglas A-4E Skyhawk, BuNo 150089, crashes in a remote area 20 miles N of Big Bear, California in Lucerne Valley at 1528 hrs. The impact touches off a 30-acre brushfire in Lovelace Canyon, south and west of the Lucerne Valley, which was still burning the following day. Eight retardant-dropping fire bombers are diverted from another blaze near Devore, California in the Cajon Pass to help contain the burn. A total of 12 California Division of Forestry and other trucks are also dispatched to the site to fight the fire. The pilot, who was flying N over Big Bear Lake on a navigation training flight, suffered an undetermined malfunction, said a public information spokesman at MCAS El Toro, California. He was seen as he ejected by a gas company serviceman, James Kennedy, who picked him up and drove him to near-by Sky-High Ranch. Carroll, a Vietnam veteran, is picked up by a rescue helicopter from George Air Force Base, California, and was not injured. Firefighters were hindered by rough, rocky terrain and a truck that overturned on an access road, blocking the path for over an hour. Fire crew were lifted to the site by helicopter or had to walk in 1 1/2 miles from Highway 18 near the Lucerne Valley.
     

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