This Day in US Military History

Discussion in 'Military' started by mhansen2, Aug 9, 2018.

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    9 September

    1862 – “Alert” was a Union barque carrying a cargo of 80 boxes of tobacco, clothes and other trade goods for sea elephant oil from New London, CT, for Navigators' Islands in the South Indian Ocean when she was captured by CSS Alabama between Corvo and Flores Islands in the Azores. Some of the cargo was removed and she was set on fire and sunk.

    1862 – “Ocean Rover” was a Union whaling barque of 313 tons out of New Bedford, Mass. She was carrying 1,100 barrels of whale oil when captured by the CSS Alabama off Flores, Azores. She was burnt along with bargue “Alert” and the crews put in 6 boats and told to row for the Azores.

    1864 – “Fawn” was a Union Steam mail boat from Norfolk. She was captured and burned by James B. Hopkins and 35 Confederate guerrillas and sailors from the ironclad CSS Albemarle at the Currituck Bridge in the Dismal Swamp Canal.

    1928 - During events held during the National Air Races at Mines Field, Los Angeles, the program "was marred by the crash of Lieut. George E. Hasselman, U.S.Navy, of the VB-2B Squadron, who crashed 50 feet to the ground in a side slip and was seriously injured." VB-2B operated Boeing F2B-1s in 1928.

    1945 - Consolidated B-32-20-CF Dominator, 42-108532, "Hobo Queen II", is damaged when the nose wheel accidentally retracts on the ground at Yontan Airfield, Okinawa. Two days later, a hoist lifting the B-32 drops it twice. Since the war has ended, it is not repaired but is disassembled at the airfield.

    1950 - A Douglas R5D-3, BuNo 56496, c/n 10624, crashed shortly after take-off from Kwajalein atoll in the South Pacific Ocean en-route to Tokyo, Japan. A total of 26 U.S. Navy personnel, including 11 nurses were killed.

    1953 - A USAF Lockheed T-33A Shooting Star attempting a landing at San Fernando Valley Airport comes down a half mile short, sweeps over an open lot and under powerlines, bounces on a street, and crashes into the front door of home in Van Nuys, California. The trainer tears through the center of the home, leaving a wing in the living room and a tank embedded in the kitchen wall, and comes to rest in the backyard. There is no fire. One victim in the house is killed.

    The plane's crew, Capt. Samuel Fast, 34, of San Fernando, the pilot, and Capt. Howard Rhodes, 30, Santa Monica, step from the fuselage unaided with only minor cuts and bruises. "The plane was on a routine acceptance test flight when landing gear trouble was reported, the CAA said."

    On Friday 11 September, nearly 200 women and children picket the Lockheed assembly plant at the Lockheed Air Terminal, to protest the testing of jet planes in the populous area.

    1953 - A U.S. Navy Douglas AD-4 Skyraider crashes, explodes on impact, and burns on the middle of Owens Dry Lake near Olancha, ~60 miles N of Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern. The bodies of three crew were retrieved by afternoon. The bomber was on a routine training mission out of NAS North Island, California. Wreckage was strewn over a 200-yard radius. Occupants of a companion plane on the flight saw the plane crash and reported it to the Inyokern station, which dispatched a rescue team and security officers. The accident occurred at 11:38 a.m.

    The Navy identified the dead the following day as: Ens. A. R. Stickney, North Hollywood; John C. Peckenpaugh, AOM 3-c, Hardinsburg, Kentucky; and Paul D. Pock, Altamont, Illinois.

    1953 - "MERCED (AP) - A two-engine Navy plane from Monterey crashed near Castle Air Force Base Wednesday and was demolished by fire. Two of the four crewmen received major injuries, all four received second degree burns."

    1955 – A Douglas B-66 Destroyer, from Hurlburt Field crashed near Alvin, Texas. Three crew members aboard the plane bailed out after their plane developed trouble at 37,000 feet. Capt. Arthur J. Manzo, radar observer-navigator, was critically injured and died of his injuries 11 September 1957. Other crew members included 1st Lt. David E. Moore, pilot, and S/Sgt. Robert J. Newland, gunner.

    1965 – Test pilot Robert Rushworth flew the X-15 to 29,627 meters (97,206 feet) and Mach 5.16.

    1993 – Former USCG Cape Strait (WPB-95308) was sunk as an artificial reef off Cape May, New Jersey.
     
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    10 September

    1846 - Schooner USS Shark ran aground on an uncharted shoal while trying to pass the Columbia River Bar and was subsequently washed ashore at the breakers and totally lost. There were no casualties.

    1863 – “Arkansas” was a Confederate stern wheel paddle steamer of 233 tons built in 1860 at Pittsburgh, Pa. She was burned on the Arkansas River at Little Rock as General Frederick Steele's Union forces approached the city.

    1863 – “Bracelet” was a Confederate cottonclad side wheel paddle steamer of 169 tons built at Louisville in 1857. She was burned by Confederate forces at Little Rock as General Frederick Steele's Union forces approached the city.

    1863 – “Julia Roane” was a Confederate stern wheel paddle steamer built in 1859 at California, Pa. She was burned at Little Rock, AK.

    1863 – “Little Rock” was a Confederate stern wheel paddle steamer of 183 tons built in 1858. She was burned by the Confederates at Little Rock on the Arkansas River as General Frederick Steele's Union army approached the capital.

    1863 - CSS Pontchartrain was a 454-ton sidewheel paddleboat built at New Albany, Indiana, in 1859. She was set afire to avoid capture and sank at Little Rock, AK.

    1863 – “St. Francis No.3” was a Confederate stern wheel cottonclad paddle steamer of 219 tons built at Jeffersonville, Indiana. She was burned on the Arkansas River at Little Rock as General Frederick Steele's Union army approached.

    1863 – “Tahlequah” was a Confederate side wheel paddle steamer of 92 tons built at Brownsville, Pa. She was burnt by Confederate forces at Little Rock on the Arkansas River upon the approach of General Steele's Union Army.

    1864 – “Florie” was a Confederate iron side-wheel steamer of 349 gross tons, built in 1863 at Glasgow, Scotland that was lost on the Cape Fear River Bar, NC, after running onto a wreck.

    1928 - While performing aerobatics at the air races held at Mines Field, Los Angeles, Lt. John J. "Johnny" Williams, leader of the Three Musketeers Air Corps stunt trio, crashes in Boeing PW-9D, 28-29, c/n 1013, of the 95th Pursuit Squadron, out of Rockwell Field, California, and is killed "almost instantly. Despite their comrade's untimely death, Lieuts. Woodring and Cornelius carried on. Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh volunteered his services, and the show continued."

    1947 – Test pilot Chuck Yeager flew the X-1 to Mach 0.91 in a control and stability test.

    1952 - A contractor-led team launches the first Boeing XF-99 Bomarc propulsion test vehicle from the Air Force Missile Test Center (AFMTC) Launch Complex 4 at Patrick AFB, Florida, on mission 621–1, but the test fails.

    1952 - Six Grumman F9F-4 Panthers from VMF-115, part of a 21-plane flight returning from a mission and, diverting from K-3 to K-2, crash into Unman-san, a South Korean mountain, in foggy conditions, following lead aircraft navigational instrument failure. All six pilots killed. Lost are Maj. Raymond E. De Mers in BuNo 125168, 2d Lt. Richard L. Roth in BuNo 125170, 2d Lt. Carl R. La Fleur in BuNo 125173, Maj. Donald F. Givens in BuNo 125178, 1st Lt. Alvin R. Bourgeois in either BuNo 125181 or 125182, and 2d Lt. John W. Hill, Jr. in BuNo 125223. Another source cites crash date of 11 September 1952.

    1956 - A US Air Force RB-50G Superfortress was lost over the Sea of Japan. The crew of 16, Lorin C. Disbrow, Raymond D. Johnson, Rodger A. Fees, Paul W. Swinehart, William J. McLauglin, Theodorus J. Trias, Pat P. Taylor, John E. Beisty, Peter J. Rahaniotes, William H. Ellis, Richard T. Kobayashi, Wayne J. Fair, Palmer D. Arrowood, Harry S. Maxwell Jr., Bobby R. Davis and Leo J. Sloan, were all presumed to be killed. It is suspected that the aircraft was lost due to a powerful storm, Typhoon Emma, which was in the area.

    1956 - During first flight of North American F-107A at Edwards AFB, California, prototype 55-5118 experiences problem with engine gearbox differential pressure during a dive and North American test pilot Bob Baker lands on dry lakebed at just under 200 knots (370 km/h). After rolling about a mile, aircraft hits a depression in the lakebed and the nose gear collapses. Jet slides ~ three-tenths of a mile on its nose, but suffers limited damage, no fire. Total landing roll was 22,000 feet (6,700 m). Airframe repaired in under two weeks.

    1960 – Test pilot Robert M. White flew the X-15 to 24,343 meters (79,869 feet) and Mach 3.23.

    1962- A U.S. Air Force Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker, AF ser. No. 60-0352, assigned at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, crashes into a fog-shrouded ravine on 5,271-foot tall Mount Kit Carson, ~20 miles NE of Spokane, Washington, at ~1105 hrs. while on approach to Fairchild AFB, Washington, killing four crew and 40 passengers. Thirty-nine were members of the 28th Bomb Wing, being sent TDY to Fairchild while runways were being repaired at Ellsworth. One civilian was on board. The aircraft mowed through a 25 X 200 yard swath of evergreens before striking the terrain and exploding. Visibility was near zero. Col. Floyd R. Cressman, of Fairchild AFB, said that it appeared that the pilot tried to pull up at the last moment.

    1975 - A U.S. Army Bell UH-1H Iroquois from Fort Rucker Army Base, Alabama, on a routine training flight crashes and burns three miles SE of Marianna Municipal Airport, Marianna, Florida, killing all three crew, an instructor pilot and two students, military officials said.
     
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    11 September

    1862 – “Weather Gauge” was a Union whaler operating out of Providence Town, Mass when she was captured by CSS Alabama on the 9th September 1862 and burned two days later.

    1936 - Sole Kellett YG-1 gyrocopter, 35-278, now assigned to the 16th Observation Squadron, is moderately damaged in a takeoff accident at Pope Army Airfield, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, its second at this field this year. Pilot was Hollingsworth F. Gregory.

    1941 – As a result of public outrage over the Greer incident, the president announces that American warships will be able to “shoot on sight” to ensure the protection of waters “necessary for American defense.” This formalizes a situation which has been commonly occurring.

    1942 – Wheeler Bryson Lipes (1921-2005), a US Navy pharmacist’s mate, saved the life of sailor Darrell Dean Rector (19) by operating, following a medical manual, in the officer’s mess aboard USS Seadragon (SS-194) below the surface of the South China Sea. George Weller (d.2002), war correspondent, won the Pulitzer in 1943 for his account of the operation.

    1943 - North American B-25G Mitchell, misreported as 41-13240, a serial number belonging to a Curtiss P-40C, of the 472d Bomb Squadron, 334th Bomb Group, Greenville Army Air Base, South Carolina, piloted by Eugene E. Stocking, collides four miles NW of Spartanburg, South Carolina, with B-25G-5 42-65013, of the same units, flown by Solon E. Ellis. 65013 crashes, killing five crew, while the unidentified Mitchell lands safely.

    1943 - The prototype Airborne and General MC-1, NX21757, prototype of the XCG-16 assault glider, begins tests at March Field, California, but on the second flight, inadequately secured ballast comes loose when the glider flies through the Lockheed C-60 glider tug's propwash, causing a catastrophic rearward shift in the center of gravity. The uncontrollable MC-1A releases from tow and enters a flat spin at 3,000 feet from which it does not recover, and crashes in a plowed field. Three of the crew and passengers bail out but only two survive the parachute jump. Paul G. Wells and Harry M. Pearl descend safely, but the parachute of Richard Chichester du Pont, 37, who won the national soaring championship five years in a row, serving as special assistant to Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold, does not open in time and he is killed. Also killed in the wreck are Col. P. Ernest Gabel, another glider specialist, deputy director of the Army Air Forces glider program, on the staff of the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, Washington, D.C., C. C. Chandler, Tarzana, California, test pilot and thrice soaring champion, and test pilot Howard L. Morrison, San Fernando, California.

    1945 – USS PC-815 was lost in a collision in dense fog with USS Laffey (DD-724) off San Diego.

    1948 - USS Mahackemo (YTB-223) sank while under tow off Cape Hatteras, N.C., enroute to Newport, R.I. Naval Base.

    1948 – Former USS Searaven (SS-196) was used as a target ship during the Operation Crossroads atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in 1946 and was lightly damaged. She was sunk as a target on this date.

    1952 - Three Air Force crew and two civilians aboard a Beechcraft C-45F Expeditor on a routine flight from Bedford, Massachusetts, to Griffiss AFB, near Rome, New York, take to the silk and bail out at 2,500 feet at ~8:50 p.m. EST near Stittville after the aircraft's port engine loses power over central New York state ~50 miles from its destination. The lightened plane then flies onward on automatic pilot for more than an hour before crashing into Lake Ontario off of Oswego. A team of researchers from the Rochester area seeking historic shipwrecks in the lake's eastern end discover the "nearly intact" airframe in deep water on 27 June 2014 using side-scan sonar. The nose and twin fins are separated from the aircraft, but the rest is there.

    The pilot was Lt. Col. Charles Callahan, 32, of Monticello, Mississippi. All on board were attached to the Air Development Center at Griffiss AFB. The others on board were 1st Lt. Sam Sharf, of New York City; Lt. Col. G. S. Lam, of Newport News, Virginia; William Bethke, a civilian technician who lives near Rome; and Joseph M. Eannario, who lives in Rome.

    1953 - One North American F-86D Sabre crashes, and another is unaccounted for after a flight of four 62d Fighter-Interceptor Squadron fighters gets separated during a wind and rain storm over Northern Illinois on Friday night. Maj. Robert L. Thomas, at O'Hare Air Reserve Station, said that two aircraft apparently lost their bearings. One came down on a farm near the community of Wilton Center, ~35 miles SW of Chicago, the pilot safe after bailing out at 10,000 feet. "The second plane was reported to have crashed in Lake Michigan adjacent to Chicago, but Thomas said that report later was found incorrect."

    1968 - Second prototype Grumman F-111B, BuNo 151971, c/n A2-02, crashes into the Pacific Ocean killing Hughes pilot Barton Warren and his RIO Anthony Byland.

    1972 - General Dynamics F-111A, 65-5703, c/n A1-21, of the 6510th Test Wing, used in spin tests out of Edwards Air Force Base, California, crashes, impacting in the desert ~10 miles from the base in a near vertical dive at ~500 knots after the crew ejected in their escape capsule. The crew survives.

    1982 - At an airshow in Mannheim, Germany, celebrating the 375th anniversary of that city, a United States Army Boeing-Vertol CH-47C Chinook, 74-22292, of the 295th Assault Support Helicopter Company—"Cyclones", located at Coleman Army Airfield, Coleman Barracks, near Mannheim, carrying parachutists crashed, killing 46 people. The crash was later found to be caused by an accumulation of ground walnut shells that had been used to clean the machinery.

    2001 – “911”
    September 11 attacks - Wikipedia

    2003 - While landing aboard USS George Washington (CVN-73) operating off the Virginia Capes, a McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18D-32-MC Hornet (Lot 13), BuNo 164198, c/n 961/DO63, 'AD 432', of VFA-106, goes off the angle at ~1600 hrs. when the arresting cable parts, pilot ejects and is recovered. The broken cable, whipping back across the deck, injures eleven deck crew, the most serious of which are airlifted to shore medical facilities.

    “Poster’s note: While described as a two seat F/A-18D here and in the list of BuNos:
    US Navy and US Marine Corps BuNos--Third Series (164196 to ??)
    The aircraft shown in the video was clearly a single seater.
    “‘Tis a puzzlement.”

    2012 – Islamic militants attacked the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, killing U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and U.S. Foreign Service Information Management Officer Sean Smith.
     
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    12 September

    1926 - Curtiss XP-6, 25-423, the fourth Curtiss P-2 reengined with a Curtiss V-1570-1 Conqueror, suffers heavy damage in a landing that results in a ground loop at Selfridge Field, Mount Clemens, Michigan. Pilot was George C. Price. Repaired, the aircraft will finish second in the 1927 Pursuit Plane Race at the National Air Races, at 189.608 mph.

    1943 - A U.S. Navy Grumman F4F Wildcat flown by Lieutenant John Lewis Morelle, USNR, 24, of Georgetown, Texas, strikes a suspension cable of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge. The wings and tail were sheared off and the plane fell burning into the bay 200 feet below. The pilot's body is not recovered. Portions of the wings and tail assembly rained down onto the roadway but no civilian was injured despite many vehicles on the span at the time. Six of seven strands of one suspension cable were snapped, but the safety of the bridge was not endangered. This was the first time a plane hit the span since its 12 November 1936 opening.

    1945 - On first flight of Northrop XP-79B, 43-52437, out of Muroc Army Air Base, California, aircraft behaves normally for ~15 minutes, then at an altitude of ~7,000 feet begins a slow roll from which it fails to recover. Pilot Harry Crosby bails out at 2,000 feet but is struck by revolving aircraft and his chute does not deploy. Largely magnesium airframe is totally consumed by fire after impact on desert floor.

    1945 - First Lt. Robert J. Anspach attempts to ferry captured Focke Wulf Fw 190F, FE-113, coded '10', from Newark Army Air Base, New Jersey, where it had been offloaded from HMS Reaper (D82) to Freeman Field, Indiana, for testing. While letting down for refueling stop at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a faulty electrical horizontal trim adjustment switch goes to full-up position and cannot be manually overridden. Pilot spots the small dirt strip, the Hollidaysburg Airport, S of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and makes an emergency landing. Upon applying brakes, right one fails immediately, the fighter pivots left, the landing gear collapses and the propeller rips away. Pilot uninjured, but the aircraft is hauled to Middletown Air Depot, Pennsylvania, and scrapped. Prop ends up on wall of local flying club.

    1946 - USS YP-636 was groping about the barren cliffs south of the Golden Gate in a dense fog when she ran aground just south of Half Moon Bay. With the vessel badly holed the crew was forced to abandon ship. There was no attempt at salvage.

    1947 – Test pilot Chuck Yeager flew the X-1 to Mach 0.92 in a stabilizer and elevator buffet check.

    1961 – Test pilot Joe Walker flew the X-15 to 34,839 meters (114,306 feet) and Mach 5.21.

    1988 - A Grumman F-14A-95-GR Tomcat, BuNo 160409, of VF-143, (also reported as VF-124) suffers an all hydraulic system failure and crashes inverted into a hangar at Gillespie Field, a civil airport in El Cajon, California, San Diego County while attempting to return to NAS Miramar. The pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Jim Barnett, 36, a flight instructor with 10 years of experience flying F-14s, managed to point the crippled jet towards the landing strip to reduce civilian casualties, and both he and his backseater, Lt. (j.g.) Randy L. Furtado, 27, a radar intercept officer who was undergoing training, ejected, suffering injuries. The RIO landed in power lines and suffered a fatal broken neck. The crash injured 3 on the ground and destroyed or damaged 19 aircraft and 13 vehicles.

    1994 – Frank Eugene Corder crashes a single-engine Cessna 150 into the White House’s south lawn, striking the West wing and killing himself.

    2012 – Former USS Coronado (AGF-11) was sunk by a number of warships and now serves as an artificial reef for the Marianas region.

    2013 – NASA announces the Voyager 1 space probe has left the solar system becoming the first man-made object to reach interstellar space.
    Voyager - Mission Status
     
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    13 September

    1946 - Major General Paul Bernard Wurtsmith (9 August 1906 – 13 September 1946), of Strategic Air Command, is killed when his North American TB-25J-27-NC Mitchell, 44-30227, of the 326th Base Unit, MacDill Field, Florida, crashes at ~1130 hrs. into Cold Mountain near Asheville, North Carolina. In February 1953, the United States Air Force named Wurtsmith Air Force Base in Oscoda Township, Michigan, in his honor.

    1948 – Former LST-661 was heavily irradiated during the Operation Crossroads atomic bomb tests and considered not worth decontaminating. She was sunk as a target at Kwajalein.

    1955 - Six people were killed when a North American B-25 suffered engine failure on takeoff from Mitchel AFB, New York, and crashed into Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, New York, five minutes after departure. Three of the victims were crew members, and three were passengers. The names of the dead were withheld pending notification of next of kin. B-25J-35/37-NC, 45-8822, modified to TB-25N, then to VB-25N, was piloted by James D. Judy.

    1968 – Test pilot Pete Knight flew the X-15 to 77,450 meters (254,113 feet) and Mach 5.37.

    1977 – Former USS Palawan (ARG-10) was sold to the State of California Ship Reef Program on 1 November 1976 and sunk off Redondo Beach, CA.

    1999 – Former USCG Red Oak (WLM-689) was scuttled at the Cape May Artificial Reef, New Jersey.
     
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    14 September

    1814 – Francis Scott Key composes the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner” after witnessing the massive British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812.

    1847 – During the Mexican-American War, U.S. forces under General Winfield Scott enter Mexico City and raise the American flag over the Hall of Montezuma, concluding a devastating advance that began with an amphibious landing at Vera Cruz six months earlier.

    1872 – Britain paid US $15 million for damages during Civil War. The British government paid £3 million in damages to the United States in compensation for building the Confederate commerce-raider Alabama.

    1901 – Twenty-fifth President of the United States William McKinley, Jr., dies today of an assassin’s bullet shot into him on September 6th.

    1939 – In the 1930s Igor Sikorsky (d.1972) turned his attention again to helicopter design and on this day flew the VS-300 on its first tethered test flight.

    1940 – Congress passed the Selective Service Act, providing for the first peacetime draft in U.S. history. It passed by one vote.

    1944 - Douglas SBD-4 Dauntless, BuNo 10575, 'B-16', crashes off bow of USS Sable (IX-81) during flight operations on Lake Michigan at 1001 hrs. Pilot Ensign Albert Grey O'Dell, A-V(N), USNR, recovered by U.S. Coast Guard 83-foot Wooden Patrol Boat WPB-83476 at 1003, brought back aboard Sable at 1013. Pilot suffers minor contusion of right shoulder, "numerous jagged lacerations of the face, chin and forehead." Airframe rediscovered on 11 April 1989 by A&T Recovery of Chicago, Illinois, and recovered 26 August 1991 on behalf of the National Museum of Naval Aviation and brought initially to Crowley's Yacht Yard for disassembly and shipment for restoration. After restoration it is displayed for a time at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio, marked as a USAAF A-24 Banshee. It is now on display in Concourse C at Chicago Midway International Airport, marked as the SBD, 'B-3', flown by Ensign Frederick Thomas Weber (4 February 1916 – 4 June 1942) of VB-6, USS Enterprise, at the Battle of Midway. Credited with a bomb hit on the Japanese carrier Hiryū, he was killed in action, and awarded the Navy Cross.

    1945 - Hurricane Nine of the 1945 season destroys three wooden blimp hangars at NAS Richmond, Florida, southwest of Miami, with 140 mph winds. Roofs collapse, ruptured fuel tanks are ignited by shorted electrical lines, fire consumes twenty-five blimps (eleven deflated), 31 non-Navy U.S. government aircraft, 125 privately owned aircraft, and 212 Navy aircraft. Thirty-eight Navy personnel injured, civilian fire chief killed. Air operations are reduced to a minimum following this storm and NAS Richmond is closed two months later.

    1955 - USAF Douglas A-26B-45-DL Invader, 44-34126, loses starboard engine on take-off from 5,142-foot-long runway 12/30, Mitchel AFB, New York, runs through perimeter fence on southeast side of field, comes to rest on the Hempstead Turnpike. Port undercarriage leg collapses, port prop blades bent. No injuries. Another source identifies this airframe as A-26B-66-DL, 44-34626, and the pilot as John E. Mervyn.

    1965 – Test pilot John McKay flew the X-15 to 72,847 meters (239,011 feet) and Mach 5.03.

    1966 - Test pilot Bill Dana flew the X-15 to 77,480 meters (254,212 feet) and Mach 5.12.

    1976 - While the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) is operating ~100 miles NW of Scapa Flow, Scotland, as part of a 100 ship NATO naval exercise, Teamwork 76, Press Day is marred by the loss of Grumman F-14A Tomcat, BuNo 159588, 'AB 221', of VF-32, over the side into the North Sea when its engines go inexplicably to full power while the fighter is being prepped for catapult 3. Steered to port away from other aircraft by the pilot as the locked brakes fail to keep the jet in place, the Tomcat's starboard wing strikes two other aircraft and as it tips off of the flight deck, pilot Lt. J. L. Kosich, and his radar intercept officer, Lt. (jg) L. E. Seymour, eject.

    A Soviet cruiser shadowing the manoeuvers notes the loss of the Tomcat and its state-of-the-art Phoenix missile and AN/AWG-9 fire control radar, so the U.S. Navy is forced into an immediate recovery effort that takes eight weeks. The nuclear research submarine NR-1 eventually retrieves the missile from a depth of 1,650 feet, and two leased heavy trawlers snag and drag the Tomcat to shallower water where the heavily damaged airframe is salvaged and found to have all its sub-systems intact.

    1977 - Boeing EC-135K, 62-3536, converted from KC-135A-BN Stratotanker, part of the 8th Tactical Deployment Control Squadron, based at Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina, on a joint training mission, departs Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, after a refuelling stop, makes right turn, crashes into steep terrain in the Manzano Mountains, two miles S of the Four Hills housing development, killing all 20 on board.

    1991 - A Sikorsky MH-53 Sea Dragon, 163071, crashes into the Persian Gulf at 2105 hrs., shortly after taking off from the USS Peleliu (LHA-5), 40 miles N of Bahrain. All 6 service members on board were killed. The aircraft was part of squadron HM-15 based out of Naval Air Station Alameda, near San Francisco.

    1997 - A USAF Lockheed F-117 Nighthawk, 81-793, of the 7th Fighter Squadron, 49th Fighter Wing, at Holloman AFB, New Mexico, lost its port wing at 1500 hrs. during a pass over Martin State Airport, Middle River, Maryland during the Chesapeake Air Show and crashed into a residential area of Bowley's Quarters, Maryland damaging several homes. Four people on the ground received minor injuries and the pilot, Maj. Bryan "B.K." Knight, 36, escaped with minor injuries after ejecting from the aircraft. A month-long Air Force investigation found that four of 39 fasteners for the wing's structural support assembly were apparently left off when the wings were removed and reinstalled in January 1996, according to a report released 12 December 1997.

    2003 - Opposing Solo Pilot, Capt. Chris R. Stricklin, in Thunderbirds Number 6, a Lockheed Martin F-16C Block 32J Fighting Falcon, 87-0327, misjudges his altitude before beginning a Split-S takeoff maneuver at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, ejects in ACES II seat 8/10ths of a second before the aircraft impacts the runway. Stricklin survived with no injuries.

    2004 - A US Navy McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18C Hornet, 164904, of VMFA-212 (another source says VMFA-121) crashes at Manbulloo Station about 10 M SW of RAAF Tindal, Australia, during a day approach to landing. The pilot ejects and is injured.

    2006 - A US Air Force Lockheed Martin F-16CJ/D Block 50B Fighting Falcon, 91-0337, of the 22d Fighter Squadron, 52d Fighter Wing, based out of Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, crashes in the nearby village of Oberkail after a landing gear failure prevents it from making a controlled landing. The pilot, 1st Lt. Trevor Merrell, ejects safely after aiming his aircraft towards a vacant cow pasture, where it crashes, causing no injuries.
     
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    15 September

    1863 – “Arabian” was a Canadian side-wheel steamer of 263 tons, built in 1851 at Niagara, Ontario. While exiting the Cape Fear River, NC, at night with a cargo of cotton, Arabian was chased back by the USS Iron Age and USS Shenandoah and ran aground north of Corncake Inlet (now New Inlet) at the entrance of the Cape Fear River, one mile below Fort Fisher at Kure Beach.

    1923 - Major Edward L. Napier, a native of Union Springs, Alabama, is killed in the crash of a Fokker D.VII, AS-5382, at McCook Field, Dayton, Ohio, He had been a Medical Corps Officer in the Great War and had transferred to the Army Air Corps. He was receiving training as a flight surgeon at the time of his death. The official report states that he was piloting the aircraft himself and there was a structural failure of a wing. In 1941, the U.S. Army Air Corps will open Napier Field at Dothan, Alabama, named in his honor.

    1924 - A Curtiss N-9 seaplane, equipped with radio control and without a human pilot aboard, was flown on a 40-minute flight at the Naval Proving Grounds, Dahlgren, Virginia. Although the aircraft sank from damage sustained while landing, this test demonstrated the practicability of radio control of aircraft.

    1942 - Vultee XA-31B-VU Vengeance, 42-35824, piloted by H. H. Sargent Jr., out of Rentschler Field, Connecticut, overturns in a tobacco field while making forced landing near Windsor Locks, Connecticut, after engine failure. Initially built as a non-flying XA-31A engine-test airframe but later upgraded for operation.

    1944 - A U.S. Army Air Force Consolidated TB-24J Liberator, 42-50890, (built as a B-24J-5-FO, and converted), of the 3007th AAF Base Unit, Kirtland Field, piloted by Warren E. Crowther, en route from Bakersfield, California, to Kirtland Field, New Mexico, and off-course, crashed into a boulder field near the top of Humphreys Peak, 10 miles N of Flagstaff, Arizona, at approx. 0330 hrs. All eight crew members were killed. The location is nearly inaccessible and has been left mostly as-is.

    1945 - USAAF Douglas C-47B-45-DK Skytrain, 45-1011, c/n 17014/34277, of the 561st Base Unit, Ft. Dix AAF, New Jersey, piloted by James E. Wuest, crashes on take-off one mile W of Kansas City, Missouri, killing 23 of 24 aboard. "KANSAS CITY, Sept. 15 (AP) - Only one of 21 homeward-bound European war veterans, passengers aboard a military air transport plane which crashed early today remained alive tonight - and his condition was critical. A crew of three died in the craft which crashed and burned only a few seconds after it took off from Fairfax airport. Three of the veterans were alive when rescue parties reached the charred wreckage on the north bank of the Missouri river. Of these, Sgt. Bernard C. Tucker, Etna, California, and Cpl. Fred Ebert, Pasadena, died later at a local hospital. Sgt. Ora DeLong, whose papers indicated he had relatives at Fort Scott, Kan., Winfield, Kan., and San Bernardino, California, remained alive this afternoon but his condition was described as critical. The big Douglas C-47 plane had just left the runway at the local airport after refueling to continue its flight westward from Newark, N. J. Witnesses said one engine sputtered as the craft left the field. The ship made it across the Missouri River, immediately north of the field lost altitude rapidly and topped a tree on the bank of the river. One wing caught the embankment of the Burlington railroad tracks and the ship caught fire, falling in flames north of the track."

    1948 – Major Richard L. Johnson, USAF, flies an F-86A Sabre to set the world aircraft speed record at 670.84 miles per hour (1,079.6 km/h) at Muroc Dry Lake, California.

    1949 - First Convair B-36 Peacemaker loss occurs when B-36B 44-92079, of the 9th Bomb Squadron, 7th Bomb Wing, crashes into Lake Worth during a night "maximum effort" mission takeoff from Carswell AFB, Texas, killing five of 13 crew. Cause attributed to two propellers going into reverse pitch. Wreckage removed from lake and scrapped.

    1974 - On third day of Naval Preliminary Evaluation (NPE-1) testing, first prototype Sikorsky YCH-53E Sea Stallion, BuNo 159121, is destroyed at the Sikorsky plant at Stratford, Connecticut when it rolls onto its side and burns after one of the main rotor blades detaches during a ground run. It had first flown on 1 March 1974. Second prototype is grounded while accident is investigated, flight testing resuming on 24 January 1975.

    1985 - A Texas Army National Guard AH-1G Cobra Tail number 67-15737 of D/1/124 CAV of 49th "Lone Star" Div. crashed shortly after take-off at 0820 hrs NW of Camp Merrill US Army Ranger TNG Camp AAF near Dahlonega, GA. Initial contact with team aircraft was made then contact was lost in a mountainous and heavily treed area. Post-crash investigation indicated N1 compressor section failure was the cause of the Class A Accident resulting in the loss of both pilots, 1LT Kevin M. Cardwell and co-pilot, 1LT Michael L. Pape Sr.
     
  8. mhansen2
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    16 September

    1620 – The Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers. The ship was headed for Virginia, where the colonists–half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs–had been authorized to settle by the British crown.

    1813 - USS Gun Boat no.164 sank in a squall at St. Mary´s, Georgia. 20 drowned.

    1854 – CDR David G. Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific.

    1862 – “Courser” was a Union whaling schooner burned off Flores Island in the Azores by CSS Alabama.

    1893 – The largest land run in history begins with more than 100,000 people pouring into the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma to claim valuable land that had once belonged to Native Americans.

    1918 – CGC Seneca’s crew attempted to bring the torpedoed British collier SS Wellington into Brest, France. The attempt failed. Five crewmen from Seneca and eleven from Wellington were killed.

    1918 - USS Buenaventura was an American cargo steamer of 4,881grt that was requisitioned by the US Navy and assigned to Naval Overseas Transportation Services as No. 1335., in July 1918. She was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine UB-129 when about 200 miles off NW Spain when on route from Le Verdon for Philadelphia in ballast.

    1919 – The American Legion was incorporated by an act of Congress.

    1940 – Under authority granted by Congress, President Franklin Roosevelt orders the Army to begin mobilizing the entire National Guard for one year’s training prompted by the worsening conditions in Europe.

    1947 - Capt. Lawson L. Lipscomb, USAAF, of Houston, Texas, radioed that he was having difficulty with his P-80 Shooting Star and was returning to Eglin Field, Florida. Emergency preparations were in place on the runways, but the fighter came down just west of the airfield and Capt. Lipscomb was killed.

    1948 – Former YOG-83 was heavily irradiated by the atomic explosions during Operation Crossroads, considered not worth to decontaminate and scuttled at Kwajalein.

    1951 - A damaged McDonnell F2H-2 Banshee jet fighter, BuNo 124968, of VF-172, returning to USS Essex (CV-9), on its first Korean War cruise, misses the recovery net and crashes into several planes parked on the ship's deck, killing seven and destroying four aircraft, two F2H-2s, BuNos. 124966 and 124968, both of VF-172. and two F9F-2 Panthers, BuNos. 125128 and 125131, of VF-51.

    1958 – USS Grayback (SSG-574) fires first operational launch of Regulus II surface to surface guided missile off CA coast; Missile carries first U.S. mail sent by guided missile.

    1958 - A Boeing B-52D Stratofortress, 55-065, crashes in the August Kahl farmyard at Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota, near St. Paul, after losing its tail section in flight. Only the co-pilot, Capt. Jack D. Craft, 29, of Sturgis, Massachusetts, survived of the eight-man crew. Air Force officials said that he was in shock and unable to answer questions. The jet tore a hole 300 feet long by 15 feet deep in the farmyard. The plane exploded as it hit, setting fire to the farm buildings. Eight members of the Kahl family were injured, and three remain hospitalized. They lost all their possessions in the explosion and fire.

    1959 - A Convair YB-58A-10-CF Hustler, 58-1017, c/n 24, of the 43rd Bomb Wing, is totally destroyed by fire following an aborted take-off from Carswell Air Force Base, Fort Worth, Texas. Two crewmen killed. The loss was directly attributed to tire failure, followed by disintegration of the wheel. Sturdier tires and new wheels will be retrofitted to the type to address this problem.

    1969 – Former USS Trepang (AGSS-412) was sunk as a target off southern California during exercise Strike Ex 4-69 by USS Henderson (DD-785) and USS Fechteler (DD-870).

    1974 – President Ford announced a conditional amnesty program for Vietnam War deserters and draft-evaders. Limited amnesty was offered to Vietnam-era draft resisters who would now swear allegiance to the United States and perform two years of public service.

    1980 - As many as 15 Libyan fighters intercepted US Air Force RC-135U Combat Sent (64-14847) of the 55 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing over the Gulf of Sidra. Accounts differ as to whether the Libyan fighters open fire on the aircraft before being chased away by US Navy fighters.
     
  9. mhansen2
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    17 September

    1630 – The city of Boston, Massachusetts is founded.

    1787 – The Constitution of the United States of America is signed by 38 of 41 delegates present at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

    1787 – The “College of Electors” (electoral college) was established at the Constitutional Convention with representatives to be chosen by the states. Pierce Butler of South Carolina first proposed the electoral college system.

    1862 – The Allegheny Arsenal explosion results in the single largest civilian disaster during the Civil War.

    1862 – “Virginia,” a Union whaler of 346 tons, was burned off Flores island, Azores, by CSS Alabama.

    1864 – Gen. Grant approved Sheridan’s plan for Shenandoah Valley Campaign. “I want it so barren that a crow, flying down it, would need to pack rations.”

    1908 – Army Signal Corps Wright Model A, Army Signal Corps serial number 1, piloted by Orville Wright, crashes at Fort Myer, Virginia, killing Lt. Thomas E. Selfridge. During the flight, which had begun soon after 5pm., a propeller broke and severed control wires. The trials continued the following year with a new smaller version of the Wright A which became the first military aircraft when purchased by the US Army. This aircraft served for two years and was retired on 4 May 1911. It is now on display at the Smithsonian Institution National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C., after having been accepted for exhibition on 20 October 1911. Selfridge AFB, Michigan, was later named for the first U.S. military air crash victim. Wright was hospitalized until 31 October 1908 and spent several more weeks on crutches.

    1917 - A kite balloon from USS Huntington (Armored Cruiser No. 5) was hit by a squall while being hauled down and struck the water so hard the observer, Lieutenant (jg) Henry W. Hoyt, was knocked out of the basket and caught underwater in the balloon rigging. As the balloon was pulled toward the ship, Patrick McGunigal, Ships Fitter First Class, (30 May 1876 – 19 January 1936) jumped overboard, cleared the tangle and put a line around Lieutenant Hoyt so that he could be hauled up on deck. For this act of heroism, McGunigal was later awarded the Medal of Honor, the first of the Great War. The Huntington was convoying six troopships across the Atlantic to France and the balloon observation was being made as it transited the war zone.

    1942 – All atomic research is place under military control. General Leslie Groves is appointed head of the program. He has deep fears about security and a dislike of the British which leads to a policy of reluctant sharing of information concerning atomic weapon development with the British Allies.

    1945 - "First Lt. Kenneth Robert Frost was killed early yesterday afternoon (17 September) when his P-38 Lightning crashed approximately 40 miles north of the Army Air field at Daggett, CA. Lt. Frost, attached to the 444th Army Air force bombardment unit, [sic] was the son of Percy O. and Louise Frost of Los Angeles. A qualified board of officers will be appointed to investigate the cause of the crash, Army officers said."

    Lost was P-38L-1-LO, 44-24492, listed as of the 444th Combat Crew Training Squadron with crash site ~25 miles NE of Yermo, CA according to the Aviation Archeology database, or of the 444th AAF Base Unit with crash site at a range 30 miles NE of Daggett as listed by Joe Baugher.

    1947 – James Forrestal (d.1949) was sworn in as first the U.S. Secretary of Defense as a new National Military Establishment unified America’s armed forces.

    1950 – North Korean Air Force aircraft drop four bombs and slightly damaged USS Rochester (CA-124) at Inchon during the first enemy air attack of the war on a U.S. ship. Three bombs missed and one struck the ship’s crane but didn’t detonate. No casualties.

    1956 - Boeing B-52B Stratofortress, 53–393, of the 93d Bombardment Wing (Heavy), crashes after an in-flight fire while returning to Castle AFB, California. Lost wing in subsequent dive, crashing near Highway 99, nine miles SE of Madera, California. Five crew killed, two bailed out safely.

    1956 - Sixth Lockheed U-2A, Article 346, 56–6679, delivered to the CIA on 13 January 1956, crashes during climb-out from Wiesbaden Air Base, Germany, when the aircraft of Detachment A, stalls at 35,000 feet (11,000 m), killing Agency pilot Howard Carey. Cause of accident never satisfactorily determined.

    1959 – Test pilot Scott Crossfield flew the X-15 on its first powered flight to 15,964 meters (52,378 feet) and Mach 2.11.

    1961 – Former USS Dragonet (SS-293) was scuttled in explosive tests in Chesapeake Bay.

    1976 – NASA publicly unveils its first space shuttle, the Enterprise, during a ceremony in Palmdale, California.

    1978 – At the White House in Washington, D.C., Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin sign the Camp David Accords, laying the groundwork for a permanent peace agreement between Egypt and Israel after three decades of hostilities.

    1981 - Near Sardinia, Italy, a USMC Sikorsky CH-53C Sea Stallion helicopter crashes while attempting to land aboard USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) during training exercises, killing all five crewmen.

    1981 – Strassberg, Germany; Mid-air collision with USAF Rockwell OV-10A Bronco (66-13553) and German Army Aviation Aérospatiale Alouette II Helicopter (75+29) during NATO exercise "Scharfe Klinge". Stuffz Andreas Heinze (25), Hptm Reinhard Ertl (31) and Capt. Donald Peter Keller (29) were killed.

    1987 - McDonnell-Douglas KC-10A Extender, 82-0190, c/n 48212, written off in ramp fire after explosion while undergoing maintenance at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, killing crew chief.

    1997 – Pres. Clinton announced that the US would not sign the int’l. treaty banning anti-personnel land mines after 89 nations rejected US demands to water down the accord. 89 nations endorsed the pact.

    2003 – Former USS Richard L. James, a 134-foot long derelict LCU, was scuttled off Hawaii.
     
  10. mhansen2
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    18 September

    1793 – President George Washington laid the foundation stone for the U.S. Capitol on Jenkins Hill.

    1861 – “Maid of the Mist” was a Union side-wheel steamer of 40 tons, built in 1859 at Evansville, Ind. She foundered there this date.

    1862 – “Elisha Dunbar” was a Union Whaler of 257 tons out of New Bedford, Mass. carrying 1,100 barrels of whale oil. She was captured by CSS Alabama and burnt some 230 miles WNW of Flores Island in the Azores.

    1931 – The Mukden Incident was initiated by the Japanese Kwangtung Army in Mukden.

    1941 – U.S. Navy ships escort eastbound British trans-Atlantic convoy for first time (Convoy HX-150). Although the U.S. Navy ships joined HX-150, which left port escorted by British ships on 16th, on night of 17 September, the official escort duty began on 18th.

    1945 - Consolidated TB-24J Liberator, built as B-24J-1-NT 42-78549, of the 425th AAF Base Unit, Gowen Field, Idaho, piloted by William P. Bordemer, suffers engine failure and crashes 38 miles N of Deeth, Nevada. "ELKO, Nev., Sept. 18 (AP) - One crewman and possibly three parachuted to safety from a Boise-based B-24 bomber which crashed today 30 miles north of Deeth, Nev., a search plane reported tonight. Lew Gourley, piloting a Piper cub, [sic] who first discovered the bomber's wreckage, said he saw one flier hanging unconscious in the harness of one 'chute and that two other 'chutes had been sighted. 'The man who was still in the 'chute harness in the morning has apparently come to,' Gourley said after a second flight to the scene. 'He was extricated from the 'chute and sat up and waved to us.'"

    1947 – The U.S. Air Force was formed as a separate military service out of the old Army Air Corps.

    1954 – The US, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, Pakistan, France, Thailand and the Philippines signed a treaty providing for the creation of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO), a collective defense pact. The organization was created in response to events in Korea and Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). The pack formally ended in 1977.

    1969 - A U.S. Air Force twin engine Douglas C-47 Skytrain crashed just after takeoff from McChord AFB in Tacoma, Washington. It came down in a wooded area just south of the runway. Five men died and seven other men were injured. Killed were Army 1st Lt. Joseph R. Baxter, assigned to Madigan General Hospital at neighboring Ft. Lewis, who died six hours after the crash; Lt. Col. Robert E. Walker, pilot and commander of a detachment of the 15th Weather Squadron at McChord; the co-pilot, Capt. Peter Cunningham of Tacoma; Air Force TSgt. Donald G. Love, the flight engineer, also assigned to McChord and an Army man, who was not immediately identified. The injured Air Force personnel were MSgt. William B. Johnston of McChord; Lt. Col. Jack S. McKinley of Virginia; Sgt. William D. Wallace of West Virginia; TSgt. Billy D. Byrd of Tucson, Arizona; and Sgt. Charles L. Andrews of Florida. Injured Navy personnel were P02 Charles B. Nichols and PO3 Darrell E. Calentine, both of California. Also injured was a retired Air Force MSgt. Granville Hicks of Missouri.

    1970 – Former USS Soley (DD-707) was sunk as a target some 75 miles NNE of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    1984 – Retired Air Force Col. Joseph Kittinger completes the first solo gas balloon crossing of the Atlantic.
     

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