The House just voted to allow hunters to kill bears hibernating with their young

Discussion in 'Congress' started by basquebromance, Mar 28, 2017.

  1. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    47,409
    Thanks Received:
    11,309
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +30,312

    It took me a long time to be able to accept the culling of certain beasties because I grew up hunting with the old adage "if it doesn't give you meat, you damn well better leave it on its feet". But as I became more involved with First Nations issues I "get it" now.

    In typical human fashion we break something in mother nature and inflict habitat loss and then we have to go about fixing it. Sheesh.
     
  2. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    47,409
    Thanks Received:
    11,309
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +30,312
    Each Chief and each band know what is good for their rez and surrounding areas. Ine Chief does not speak for all. And they have input with Resource Managers and Wildlife biologists Jake. This is not just some willy nilly deal to get trophies for crying out loud.
     
  3. JakeStarkey
    Offline

    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    152,971
    Thanks Received:
    13,766
    Trophy Points:
    2,165
    Ratings:
    +42,272
    For crying out loud, you are conflating a BC local wolf cull with the killing of hiberating animals.

    Come on, you are better than this.
     
  4. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    47,409
    Thanks Received:
    11,309
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +30,312
    One has to remember bears will hunt and kill a calf in a heart beat. We ain't talking Winnie, Smoky, Yogi or Boo Boo. This is what Fish and Game in Alaska had to do a few years back to save the moose population.

    And yes they took the hides as well and the meat.

    " FAIRBANKS - State wildlife biologists from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game recently killed almost 90 bears and delivered nearly 4 tons of bear meat to residents in eight villages in western Interior Alaska as part of a predator control program designed to increase the number of moose in the area.

    Fish and Game staff shot 89 bears — 84 black bears and five grizzlies — in game management unit 19A along the Kuskokwim River during a two-week program that began on May 13 and ended Monday. The area is about 300 miles southwest of Fairbanks.

    Biologists shot the bears from a helicopter in a 530-square mile area of state land that is a small part of unit 19A, which encompasses nearly 10,000 square miles east of Aniak.

    The goal of the program was to reduce the number of bears in the area as low as possible, Fish and Game spokeswoman Cathie Harms said. It was the first year of a two-year predator control program approved by the Alaska Board of Game last spring at the request of local residents concerned about low moose numbers.

    The nearly 8,000 pounds of meat from the bears, valued at approximately $80,000, was distributed to villagers in Aniak, Chuathbaluk, Crooked Creek, Lime Village, Kalskag, Red Devil, Sleetmute and Stony River, Harms said.

    The bears ranged in age from yearlings to mature adults. Biologists avoided shooting sows with cubs of the year. Hides from larger bears were sent to Fairbanks and will be sold at the annual fur auction in Fairbanks in March.

    Removal of the bears, which cost approximately $230,000, should boost survival of moose calves in the area, Harms said.

    “Bears are most efficient at taking young moose, so calves being born now will have a much higher chance of survival,” she said. “Once calves have survived a year, they’re not as vulnerable.”

    The program won’t have a permanent effect on the moose population, but it should have a measurable effect for several years, Harms said. The department will conduct moose surveys to monitor the population.

    “Within the next year or two we should be able to see an increase in moose numbers,” she said.

    The bear control area previously was the best moose hunting area in all of unit 19A, but the moose population has declined dramatically in recent years. Most of the unit has been closed to moose hunting since 2005, and only a few subsistence hunts remain open.

    The moose harvest in all of unit 19A has averaged between 75 and 100 moose the past five years. The harvest objective set by the Board of Game for the unit is 400 to 550 moose."

    89 bears killed in Alaska predator control program
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    47,409
    Thanks Received:
    11,309
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +30,312

    It's a cull. Not a hunt. BC/Yukon/NWT/Alaska all are dealing with predator problems. I just put up how Alaska saved one moose herd that was rapidly declining by aerial hunting.

    My druthers would be to cull the bears in hibernation so they aren't running in mortal fear from airplanes and gunfire. I would consider the hibernation cull to be far more humane. Think about that Jake.

    The sheer terror these beasies must endure before death. This is the part that rips me apart the most. But I understand why culls are crucial to a balance.
     
  6. keepitreal
    Offline

    keepitreal Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2016
    Messages:
    2,094
    Thanks Received:
    865
    Trophy Points:
    1,050
    Ratings:
    +2,081
    No, this gives you an ideal how they're seizing the opportunity
    to drive up the number of moose and caribou for trophy hunters!

    This is so fucking appalling on so many levels...

    The only reason for protecting moose, caribou, etc
    should be for sustaining a food source for predators and locals

    Protecting prey, from predators, for trophy hunters...
    unfuckingbelievable !

    Just look at who sponsored the bill...
    enough said!
     
  7. tinydancer
    Offline

    tinydancer Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    47,409
    Thanks Received:
    11,309
    Trophy Points:
    2,070
    Location:
    Sundown
    Ratings:
    +30,312

    In Alaska it is the State wildlife biologists from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game that do the culling. They don't take trophys and they give the meat to the First Nations.

    You really don't get it do you? Bears sense of smell is so great that they are able to be on a moose/elk/caribou calf right after birth.

    Here's how fast herds can go down.

    "The woodland caribou that live in and around the Rockies in southern British Columbia and Alberta are listed as threatened by the Canadian government; the committee of scientific experts that advises the government considers them endangered.

    In the South Peace region, the Klinse-Za herd has declined from 191 animals in 1997 to only 16 in 2013, with no calves surviving predation that year."

    It's so freaking bad that they are airlifting pregnant moose to be protected in a pen away from wolves and bears.

    Airlifting Pregnant Caribou Away From Wolves
     
  8. JakeStarkey
    Offline

    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    152,971
    Thanks Received:
    13,766
    Trophy Points:
    2,165
    Ratings:
    +42,272
    There is no need for a hibernation cull, particularly when much of it is not for the First Peoples but for agribusiness benefit.
     
  9. theHawk
    Offline

    theHawk Registered Conservative

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Messages:
    15,686
    Thanks Received:
    3,165
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Location:
    Germany
    Ratings:
    +12,832
    So you don't have a problem with culling dangerous wildlife, just culling during their hibernation. So you want humans to hunt them when they are awake and dangerous. If they need to cull. It would seem that doing it while they are hibernating would be the safest as well as the most humane for the animal.

    To all of you whining about the cruelty of putting them down in their sleep, do you advocate that when an animal veterinary needs to put an animal down they don't sedate them to put them to sleep first?
     
  10. JakeStarkey
    Offline

    JakeStarkey Diamond Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    152,971
    Thanks Received:
    13,766
    Trophy Points:
    2,165
    Ratings:
    +42,272
    theBawk demonstrates he has no idea about conservation, wilderness, and culls.

    The issue is about agribusiness getting Congress to protect its profits.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
can hunters defend their kill from bears
,

did congress allow the killing of bears

,
did congress approve the hunting of bears while hibernating
,
did congress just approve of killing hibernating bears