State jobless rates stabilize as layoffs slow State unemployment rates stabilize as..

Discussion in 'Economy' started by Neubarth, Mar 27, 2010.

  1. Neubarth
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    Neubarth At the Ballpark July 30th

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    If you want to see doublespeak at its best read the asinine report below. 27 states reported increases in unemployment. 16 states reported that their rates were the same. Now with that in plain view for the reader, the report out of Washington says State Jobless rates stabilize as layoffs slow. Insanity to the max. They think that you are so fucking stupid that you can not see that the reality of the numbers is that we are still collapsing. Lies, lies and still more lies out of Washington. And it isn't even 1984.


    State jobless rates stabilize as layoffs slow


    State unemployment rates stabilize as layoffs slow, job market slowly heals

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- State unemployment rates stabilized last month, reflecting a broader nationwide trend, according to a Labor Department report Friday. Sixteen states said their jobless rate was unchanged in February, seven reported declines and 27 reported increases.

    That's an improvement from January, when 30 states saw their rates rise, and much better than December, when joblessness rose in 43 states.

    The nationwide unemployment rate was 9.7 percent in February, the same as the previous month. Layoffs are slowing as the economy is recovering and there are signs that employers are stepping up hiring.

    The economy is likely to generate more than 150,000 new jobs this month, according to a survey of economists by Thomson Reuters. The national figures for March will be released next Friday. The jobless rate is forecast to remain at 9.7 percent.

    These "readings are consistent with labor markets beginning to show some stability," said Donald Schunk, an economist at Coastal Carolina University near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
     
  2. Neubarth
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    Neubarth At the Ballpark July 30th

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    Remember, if you drop 300,000 from the labor force, you can easily claim that 150,000 jobs were created because of the mythical birth and death index that the government uses to factor into their survey that nobody ever remembers being contacted for. Remember also that the government has been using a calculation for average annual job creation to figure out how many jobs have been created each month. They have continued to use that factor all the way into this depression. That is how they can come out with outrageous numbers that say only 20,000 jobs were lost in this month or that month when any simpleton can look at how drastically the labor force was cut and people were dropped from the Unemployment rolls and KNOW that the government is lying like hell.
     
  3. pinqy
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    pinqy Gold Member

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    No you can't. There is no birth/death model for the labor force. The birth death model (it's not an index) is for the Current Employment Survey which I don't think you've ever claimed doesn't exist, unlike your claims that the government has been lying since 1941 about the Current Population Survey. You really can't compare job creation/loss with the labor force. Different surveys, different concepts and definitions. If a person has two jobs and loses one, that's a job loss in the CES but no change at all in the CPS because he's still employed.


    Sort of kind of. The sample for the CES uses the universe of businesses that contribute to UI. But that can't be recalculated every month, only once a year. So some businesses can no longer be reached because they close shop, and new businesses come into being that aren't on the latest list used. So to properly represent those changes that can only be guessed at, a statistical model is used to account. It is known that, especially in a recession, the model will be off. But it's less off than if the model wasn't used at all. It's partly because of the limitations that the March 2009 numbers were way off and everything had to be adjusted.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2010
  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Lots of people's unemployment benefits are running out around here.
     

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