Sorta Bitchin, Sorta Not

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Annie, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I really, really need to get a new postion teaching. First off, I need the $ of working in public schools, (yeah, I know it demonstrates the waste of $ the public sector has v private-but YOU try to get by on less than 30k, after 5 years, 3 bachelor's and over 1/2 way through master's.)

    I also want to move on to high school. While I love the hormonal challenge offered and innocence still found in Middle School, I've conquered the curriculum and want to go a bit further. Right now, I get to use the history info, but the sociology and political science are gathering dust. (ok, not really, but you should see the poor kids eyes glaze over when I go on with Concentric Zone theory! :shocked: ) I really need some AP classes here!

    In the spring I filled out countless online apps for my area, just about anything within an hour's drive, except Chicago, because they have a residency requirement-unless one makes over 50k, can't get a decent apartment in a decent neighborhood, and then I'd have to give up my home and car. No way could I afford to buy in Chicago! Not a peep on any of them, though my son's Social Studies Chair, who was his AP/Honors course teacher for 3 years, called me to say he had my resume and there was no openings this year, but he knew of 11 for next, so that was something. (Didn't hurt the kid is a brainiac in political science and economics, though swings left! Alas, :shocked: , I fault the Chair for this, but have never let him know. I also helped him, taking 2 personal days, on a mock UN meeting for the sophomore class, so that's an 'in.')

    Today went to a 'teacher's job fair,' in the Loop. Great location, on Michigan Ave across from the Art Institute. Parked, ($15), went to the Art Institute for 2 hours, then to the fair. While there were 30 districts, all but 2 of them were either out of my specialties, or over an hour's drive. Went for the one in 'better area' closer to my home. Stood in line for 3.5 hours. Got the interview, 'no social studies openings this year, but tons expected next year.' She asked if I'd applied to area schools in the spring, I answered, "Yes, of course." She asked if I'd had any interviews, I said, "No. I can't figure out why." She said that I might be percieved as 'threatening' to some department chairs, too many degrees and now going for an administrative one. (Which could apply to chairing.) She asked how close to endorsements in econ, the only 'social study' I'm not certified or endorsed in? I said 3 courses, which I could take at the community college. She gave me her phone and the superintendent's phone and said to call in January. She also told me that an opening could happen at any time, would I be willing to leave, if called? I said, "I don't know, I'd have to have a real call, I couldn't hypothesize that."

    Business savvy or school savvy ones, what if they should call after September? Think it would be seen as 'screwing the school one has a 'contract' with, though we all know it wouldn't be enforced? What about the kids I'm teaching at the time? We are talking $48k per year v $28+ where I am now.
     
  2. 5stringJeff
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    5stringJeff Senior Member

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    In the words of... umm... that guy from Jerry Macguire, "Show Me The Money!"

    If you get a job mid-year that a) pays more, and b) is more academically challenging, then go for it!
     
  3. Fmr jarhead
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    Fmr jarhead Senior Member

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    I think your primary concern should be to your family and yourself. If the contract is unenforceable (talk with an attorney, so you know for sure!), then if you get the call, you should jump at the opportunity.

    As a suggestion, maybe you should only put down the qualifications necessary to get the postion, and not ALL the degrees you have if they aren't relative to the employement you seek. You could slowly bring the other degrees in to play as you get more time under your belt with the new district.

    (I used to live in S Elgin.....nice areas west of Chicago....and I spent a fair amount of time in the city, as well)
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Kinda where I'm heading. Still and all. One would think that the district that hires you, under those circumstances, might think you'd do the same to them down the road? Just don't see how I could turn an offer down.
     
  5. Moi
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    Moi Active Member

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    when was your contract signed? was it a while ago so that things have changed or do you have to resign annually. how do you know it won't be enforced? if it is, what's the penalty for violating it? Just some thoughts.

    It isn't going to look good to any employer if you skate away from responsibility. However, if you leave your job with enough time for them to find a replacement that should be all that a new employer can ask for.

    I can't imagine anyone not understanding that making a living wage, advancing your career so that you have longevity (and thus a living) and taking advantage of an opportunity that doesn't come along often are important...they will understand.

    All in all, I would say do whatever makes you live with yourself...if they call and you can push them off until the end of the semester or whatever, great. If not, leave and move on.

    What about telling your current employer now why you are considering leaving...is there anything they can do/offer to make you want to stay?
     
  6. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'm not too worried about my current employer, they won't enforce the contract for several reasons, the first being that they could not permanently fill the position if they are fighting my leaving.

    The principal does know I was looking for a job, but would be shocked if I left after school started-we have a very weird relationship, which is part of the reason that I really wanted to move on. She has very strong strenths, but also glaring weaknesses-the worst being, she can't seem to ask for help to avoid disasters with parents and students. That happens to be my strengths-which instead of utilizing, threatens her. Last year the school board actually tried to create a 'position' for me, to be part time support for her. She was able to block that. Would only have been a few thousand, but would have at least made a bit of breathing room. Still I have to sit in on parent-student meetings with her in the junior high, even when not my kid and I'm not having a problem with them. (not very fair, but saves problems for me down the line.)

    Heck, I'm probably worrying about nothing, but the interviewer did tell me I should probably go to high school principals next year with my resume, after sending it to the superintendent that probably sends them to dept. chairs after vetting them. Guess that was a good piece of advice for the afternoon. :)
     

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