Someone emailed this to me...

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by fuzzykitten99, May 5, 2005.

  1. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    Interesting facts about my state (no, not everlasting confusion) Minnesota:

    Minnesota Facts and Trivia
    Minnesotan baseball commentator Halsey Hal was the first to say 'Holy Cow' during a baseball broadcast.

    The Mall of America in Bloomington is the size of 78 football fields --- 9.5 million square feet.

    Minnesota Inventions: Masking and Scotch tape, Wheaties cereal, Bisquick, HMOs, the bundt pan, Aveda beauty products, and Green Giant vegetables

    The St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959 allowing oceangoing ships to reach Duluth.

    Minneapolis is home to the oldest continuously running theater (Old Log Theater) and the largest dinner theater (Chanhassan Dinner Theater) in the country.

    The original name of the settlement that became St. Paul was Pig's Eye. Named for the French-Canadian whiskey trader, Pierre "Pig's Eye" Parrant, who had led squatters to the settlement.

    The world's largest pelican stands at the base of the Mill Pond dam on the Pelican River, right in downtown Pelican Rapids. The 15 1/2 feet tall concrete statue was built in 1957.

    The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden is the largest urban sculpture garden in the country.

    The Guthrie Theater is the largest regional playhouse in the country.

    Minneapolis’ famed skyway system connecting 52 blocks (nearly five miles) of downtown makes it possible to live, eat, work and shop without going outside.

    Minneapolis has more golfers per capita than any other city in the country.

    The climate-controlled Metrodome is the only facility in the country to host a Super Bowl, a World Series and a NCAA Final Four Basketball Championship.

    Minnesota has 90,000 miles of shoreline, more than California, Florida and Hawaii combined.

    The nation’s first Better Business Bureau was founded in Minneapolis in 1912.

    The first open heart surgery and the first bone marrow transplant in the United States were done at the University of Minnesota.

    Bloomington and Minneapolis are the two farthest north latitude cities to ever host a World Series game.

    Madison is the "Lutefisk capital of the United States".

    Rochester is home of the world famous Mayo Clinic. The clinic is a major teaching and working facility. It is known world wide for its doctor's expertise and the newest methods of treatments.

    The Bergquist cabin, built in 1870 by John Bergquist, a Swedish immigrant, is the oldest house in Moorhead still on its original site.

    For many years, the world's largest twine ball has sat in Darwin. It weighs 17,400 pounds, is twelve feet in diameter, and was the creation of Francis A. Johnson.

    The stapler was invented in Spring Valley.

    In 1956, Southdale, in the Minneapolis suburb of Edina, was the first enclosed climate-controlled suburban Shop50states.

    Private Milburn Henke of Hutchinson was the first enlisted man to land with the first American Expeditionary Force in Europe in WWII on January 26, 1942.

    The first practical water skis were invented in 1922 by Ralph W. Samuelson, who steam-bent 2 eight-foot-long pine boards into skies. He took his first ride behind a motorboat on a lake in Lake City.

    In Olivia a single half-husked cob towers over a roadside gazebo. It is 25 feet tall, made of fiberglass, and has been up since 1973.

    The first Children's department in a Library is said to be that of the Minneapolis Public Library, which separated children's books from the rest of the collection in Dec. 1889.

    The first Automatic Pop-up toaster was marketed in June 1926 by McGraw Electric Co. in Minneapolis under the name Toastmaster. The retail price was $13.50.

    On September 2, 1952, a 5 year old girl was the first patient to under go a heart operation in which the deep freezing technique was employed. Her body temperature, except for her head, was reduced to 79 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Floyd Lewis at the Medical School of the University of Minnesota performed the operation.

    The first Aerial Ferry was put into Operation on April 9, 1905, over the ship canal between Duluth to Minnesota Point. It had room enough to accommodate 6 automobiles. Round trip took 10 min.

    Rollerblades were the first commercially successful in-line Roller Skates. Minnesota students Scott and Brennan Olson invented them in 1980, when they were looking for a way to practice Hockey during the off-season. Their design was an ice hockey boot with 3 inline wheels instead of a blade.

    The first Intercollegiate Basketball game was played in Minnesota on February 9,1895.

    In 1919 a Minneapolis factory turned out the nations first armored cars.

    Tonka Trucks were developed and are continued to be manufactured in Minnetonka.

    Hormel Company of Austin marketed the first canned ham in 1926. Hormel introduced Spam in 1937.

    Introduced in August 1963, The Control Data 6600, designed by Control Data Corp. of Chippewa Falls, was the first Super Computer. It was used by the military to simulate nuclear explosions and break Soviet codes. These computers also were used to model complex phenomena such as hurricanes and galaxies.

    Candy maker Frank C. Mars of Minnesota introduced the Milky Way candy bar in 1923. Mars marketed the Snickers bar in 1930 and introduced the 5 cent Three Musketeers bar in 1937. The original 3 Musketeers bar contained 3 bars in one wrapper. Each with different flavor nougat.

    A Jehovah's Witness was the first patient to receive a transfusion of artificial blood in 1979 at the University of Minnesota Hospital. He had refused a transfusion of real blood because of his religious beliefs.

    Minnesota has one recreational boat per every six people, more than any other state.

    There are 201 Mud Lakes, 154 Long Lakes, and 123 Rice Lakes commonly named in Minnesota.

    The Hull-Rust mine in Hibbing became the largest open-pit mine in the world.

    Minnesota's waters flow outward in three directions: north to Hudson Bay in Canada, east to the Atlantic Ocean, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.

    At the confluence of the Big Fork and Rainy Rivers on the Canadian border near International Falls stands the largest Indian burial mound in the upper midwest. It is known as the Grand Mound historic site.

    Author Laura Ingalls Wilder lived on Plum Creek near Walnut Grove.

    Akeley is birthplace and home of world's largest Paul Bunyan Statue. The kneeling Paul Bunyan is 20 feet tall. He might be the claimed 33 feet tall, if he were standing.

    Hibbing is the birthplace of the American bus industry. It sprang from the business acumen of Carl Wickman and Andrew "Bus Andy" Anderson - who opened the first bus line (with one bus) between the towns of Hibbing and Alice in 1914. The bus line grew to become Greyhound Lines, Inc.

    The first official hit in the Metrodome in Minneapolis was made by Pete Rose playing for the Cincinnati Reds in a preseason game.

    Polaris Industries of Roseau invented the snowmobile.

    Twin Cities-based Northwest Airlines was the first major airline to ban smoking on international flights.

    Alexander Anderson of Red Wing discovered the processes to puff wheat and rice giving us the indispensable rice cakes.

    In 1898, the Kensington Rune stone was found on the farm of Olaf Ohman, near Alexandria. The Kensington Rune stone carvings allegedly tell of a journey of a band of Vikings in 1362.
     
  2. GotZoom
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    GotZoom Senior Member

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    My sister-in-law is moving to Rochester in June to work at the Mayo.

    Here are some more interesting facts about your state:


    The land of 10,000 lakes declares mosquitoes a public nuisance.

    It is illegal to stand around any building without a good reason to be there.

    A person may not cross state lines with a duck atop his head.

    It is illegal to sleep naked.

    All men driving motorcycles must wear shirts.

    Citizens may not enter Wisconsin with a chicken on their head.

    Oral sex is prohibited. (Repealed)

    All bathtubs must have feet.

    Residents of even numbered addresses may not water their plants on odd-numbered days excluding the thirty first day where it applies. (Cottage Grove)

    It shall be the duty of any policeman or any other officer to enforce the provisions of this Section, and if any cat is found running at large, or which is found in any street, alley or public place, it shall be the duty of any policeman or other officer of the city to kill such cat. (Hibbing)

    Red cars may not drive down Lake Street. (Minneapolis)

    Driving a truck with dirty tires is considered a public nuisance. (Minnetonka)

    Placing tacks on a sidewalk is considered a public nuisance. (Minnetonka)

    Any person who persuades another to enter a massage therapist business after 11:00 PM is guilty of a misdemeanor. (Minnetonka)

    Hamburgers may not be eaten on Sundays. (St. Cloud)

    You're not allowed to park your elephant on Main Street. (Virginia)
     
  3. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    Some impressive facts there, FuzzyKitten. Must be a very interesting place to live. I worked with a man from Albert Lea some years back, and he said that in the winter when the lakes freeze over, people just drive their vehicles across the frozen lakes as short cuts to wherever it is they are going. Also, that snow gets so deep that when it is plowed by the road crews, driver's can't tell where the intersections are, so they run up flags at the intersections to solve that problem. Winter is nothing like that here, but even so, we have our share of "snowbirds" who take off for Florida as soon as the first snow flake falls.
     
  4. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    the driving on the lakes thing is 100% true.

    have you ever seen "Grumpy Old Men"? ...the ice-fishing scene is authentic. It looks like little towns all over the lakes. They do have to be thick enough to drive on, but MOST (i say most because we have our share of short-bus candidates)...people have enough common sense to wait after the first few freezes, as well as for the DNR to let us know when its safe to drive on. Lately, most people just use ATVs or snowmobiles to tow their ice-houses on the lake, just because they would rather lose the ATV or sled than a whole truck if the ice were to give way. Their truck is safely on shore, and they can still get home.

    In fact, the sled and ATV is the most chosen of vehicles in the winter when you get North of Elk River, because everything is so far apart, and you can go nearly everywhere on one as they are allowed along the highways in the ditches. My grandpa plows his driveway with his atv.

    I also would like to apologize to this country for SPAM. aka Stuff Posing As Meat. I love Bill Engvall's take on it "Ever look at the ingredients on the can? It says pork, water, and mechanically separated chickens. Where I'm from, that's roadkill"
     
  5. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    i've heard of those. there was a big thing about them on the news several years ago, because of the oral sex one. then they found the one about the duck on your head (ok, so we had -and still do- a few nutjobs running the state)...it made the nightly news for 3 days in a row.
     

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