Solar Charging For Electric Cars? Could It Work?...

Discussion in 'Environment' started by LibocalypseNow, Jul 9, 2010.

  1. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    I'm certainly no scientist or engineer and that's why i'm asking this question. We are currently observing how a Heat Wave in the North is stressing their power grids. So how would millions of new electric cars on the roads affect these same power grids? My guess is that it just isn't possible to have millions of new electric cars on the roads. I just don't see how the power grids could handle the added stress. Even if we added more Nuclear Energy to the mix,i just don't see it working out. Nuclear Energy also brings quite a bit of baggage to the table as well.

    The only conclusion i have been able to come to is solar charging. Some sort of solar panel would have to be attached to the electric car. It sounds like it would be very expensive and i'm not sure how it would affect night driving either. Just a thought anyway. I really would like to hear your input on this. I'm sure there are many of you on this board who have more knowledge on this stuff than i do. So fire away. Thanks.
     
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  2. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Another idea i had would be to use solar power to actually keep our electricity plants going in the day time but then switch them over to regular electricity output at night. Just spit-balling here. Like i said,i'm no expert on this stuff.
     
  3. MikeK
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    MikeK Gold Member

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    I am totally ignorant about the technology but last night I saw a news clip of a solar powered airplane that had successfully flown for 26 hours. its top speed was something like 55mph, but I'm sure that will be improved.

    It didn't say where the collector panels were situated or what they cost.
     
  4. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Yea i really do believe that harnessing the Sun's awesome power is the only option left for us. I thought about Wind but that's just not gonna do it in the end. Massive Wind Farms take up way too much space and kill a lot of our wildlife. The Sun seems logical.
     
  5. Mr Clean
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    Mr Clean Gold Member

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    If they can sell those little solar powered garden lights at Home Depot for $4 each, surely someone somewhere has the wherewithall to expand that technology to do other more important things.
     
  6. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Yea that's what i've been thinking for a long time. We need to use the Sun's awesome power to power our nation and this certainly includes our automobiles. The rest of the options just seem like temporary band-aids to me. That's just my take anyway. Thanks.
     
  7. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Solar power is certainly an attractive possibility especially for the sun drenched west. The major problems are still the extreme cost that puts it out of the reach of most households and it's relativley poor efficincies. In areas where it is possible geothermal is by far the best way to go. It is still relatively expensive but the efficincies are much better than solar so the costs should drop faster.

    Wind power on the other hand is still good for small local scale energy production but little else.
     
  8. LibocalypseNow
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    LibocalypseNow Senior Member

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    Yea and what about those cold & sunless days in the colder regions of our country? How would solar charging work in those conditions? Hmm?
     
  9. edthecynic
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    edthecynic Censored for Cynicism

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    Nanotechnology!
    Solar collectors can be made from ink.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCWrvNcvNTE&feature=related]YouTube - Inside Nanosolar - Thin-Film Solar Startup[/ame]
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Libo, solar is an excellant power source in any part of the nation. It is getting cheaper every day now. Dupont manufactures panels now that sell for $120 and put out 100 watts.

    A 5 kw grid parallel invertor can be had for about $2500. Solar would put electricity on the line precisely when most needed in the summer. And most of the electric cars would be charged at night, when the grid has the least demand.

    If one is capable of doing the mounting work themselves, one can have a 5 kw system for under $10,000 today.

    What is needed now is a distributed grid, and a federal law that allows homeowners and commercial establishments to sell their excess power back to the utility at a substancial per centage of the residential retail rate. At least 75%.

    [ame=http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=FJY-epayVcc]YouTube - New Solar Panels from DuPont[/ame]
     

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