McCarthyism Style Witch-Hunt Attacks Baseball Players

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Itsthetruth, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. Itsthetruth
    Online

    Itsthetruth Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    CounterPunch
    March 11, 2005

    Kucinich: from Peacenik to Grand Inquisitor
    Neo-McCarthyism Slugs Major League Baseball
    By DAVE ZIRIN


    Now, as Cubs manager Dusty Baker says, a new "McCarthyism," is being imposed on Major League Baseball. A congressional committee, already preening for the nearest cameras, has been tasked with "getting steroids out of Major League Baseball." Current and former players Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro, Curt Shilling, Frank Thomas, Jason Giambi, Mark McGwire and Jose Canseco, have all been subpoenaed to testify under oath.

    Major League Baseball and the Players Association have pledged to fight the subpoenas, taking the unprecedented step to unite under one attorney, Mr. Stanley Brand. Brand is arguing all over TV land that this congressional committee has no jurisdiction, is violating the player's first amendment privacy rights with no purpose but to "satisfy their prurient interest into who may and may not have engaged in this activity." Brand has also made the point that forcing former and current major leaguers to answer questions or risk prison will accomplish nothing since baseball just adopted a far-reaching steroid testing plan. Brand argues that the MLB program, like any drug testing plan in any work place, has a confidentiality agreement that would be worthless if players feel compelled to accept immunity, name names, and rat out teammates.

    But players and their union shouldn't stop there. They could bury this ridiculous congressional committee in its own bloated sanctimony. The inquestors, like in McCarthy's first go around, range politically from arch right winger Rep. Cliff Stearns to liberal darling Dennis Kucinich. Kucinich, as with the liberals of the past, pledges that this will not be a "witch-hunt." Kucinich also promised to "stand up" to pro-war democrats at last July's convention. We shouldn't have believed him then. We sure as hell shouldn't believe him, or any of the committee's liberals now.

    That's why anyone who opposes the unchecked power of the federal government, who cares about civil liberties and rights in the work place, should oppose these hearings. We can't compare this witch-hunt to the more devastating ones in the 50s but it is part of a trend of attacks on civil liberties, academic freedom, and anyone who dares buck against the bipartisan party line. In a time when students are being investigated for singing Bob Dylan and wearing the wrong t-shirts, and Gitmo is just a stone's throw away, such hearings help create an atmosphere where the bipartisan pit bull in Washington feels it can get away with more, and more, and more. The time has come for all of us to collectively ask the question of Congress that Joseph Welch asked of McCarthy five decades ago: "How have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last have you left no sense of decency?" Only this time--at long last--we should press for an answer.

    http://www.counterpunch.org/zirin03112005.html
     
  2. musicman
    Offline

    musicman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    Messages:
    5,171
    Thanks Received:
    533
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Ohio
    Ratings:
    +533
    Documents declassified after the fall of the Soviet Union prove that - not only was McCarthy right - he didn't know the half of it. In that context, I wonder what "neo-McCathyism" really means - pointing out unpleasant truths?
     
  3. musicman
    Offline

    musicman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    Messages:
    5,171
    Thanks Received:
    533
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Ohio
    Ratings:
    +533
    "...devastating [witch hunts] of the fifties..." - LMAO! Every f***ing one of them was a communist.
     
  4. musicman
    Offline

    musicman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2004
    Messages:
    5,171
    Thanks Received:
    533
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Ohio
    Ratings:
    +533


    And he wears the intellectual pedigree so proudly!
     
  5. Itsthetruth
    Online

    Itsthetruth Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    What do you think Joseph McCarthy was right on? Please post a internet link to all those declassified documents.

    Thanks
     
  6. Merlin1047
    Offline

    Merlin1047 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,500
    Thanks Received:
    449
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    AL
    Ratings:
    +450
    A lot of ranting of "witch hunts" and violating people's rights.

    Yet no mention whatever of the pernicious impact of performance enhancing drugs on professional sports.

    And no mention of any plan to get players to stop using them and team owners and coaches to stop encouraging it.


    Hmmmmm.
     
  7. SmarterThanYou
    Online

    SmarterThanYou Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    steroids suck. they should be illegal.

    It doesn't make athletes, it makes enhanced abominations.]

    If we wanted to watch 'super' baseball(or any other sport for that matter) we would have built robots a long time ago.

    steroids detracts from the natural athleticism that makes an athlete a great athlete.
     
  8. Trinity
    Offline

    Trinity VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Messages:
    1,286
    Thanks Received:
    78
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings:
    +79
  9. Itsthetruth
    Online

    Itsthetruth Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    It was a major national news story.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


    January 14, 2005
    Random and offseason testing instituted
    ESPN.com news services


    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- With stars like Barry Bonds under suspicion and lawmakers demanding action, Major League Baseball adopted a tougher steroid-testing program that will suspend first-time offenders for 10 days and randomly test players year-round.

    "I've been saying for some time that my goal for this industry is zero tolerance regarding steroids," commissioner Bud Selig said.

    A first positive test would result in a penalty of 10 days, a second positive test in a 30-day ban, a third positive in a 60-day penalty, and a fourth positive test in a one-year ban -- all without pay.

    Tony Gwynn's Take

    "MLB's new steroid-testing agreement is a good move — and it's good that the players, owners and commissioner all want it and agree on it. Eventually, I'd like to see the penalties become stiffer. But a suspension of up to 10 games is a good start.

    What's probably more important than the suspension is the public scrutiny players will undergo if they get caught. That might be tougher than the suspension. I believe fans deserve to know who's using steroids. With the new system, they'll know."

    "It appears to be a significant breakthrough," Senator John McCain said in Washington.

    Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson commended players and owners.

    "Not only is this good for the game and for the sport in general, but professional athletes are role models to millions of youth and aspiring athletes across the country," Thompson said, "and this step shows that the long-term health consequences do not outweigh any short-term gain."

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=1966232
     
  10. Itsthetruth
    Online

    Itsthetruth Guest

    Ratings:
    +0
    UNITED STATES SENATE CENSURE OF SENATOR JOSEPH MCCARTHY

    Resolved, That the Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. McCarthy, failed to cooperate with the Subcommittee on Privileges and Elections of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration in clearing up matters referred to that subcommittee which concerned his conduct as a Senator and affected the honor of the Senate and, instead, repeatedly abused the subcommittee and its members who were trying to carry out assigned duties, thereby obstructing the constitutional processes of the Senate, and that this conduct of the Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. McCarthy, is contrary to senatorial traditions and is hereby condemned.

    Sec 2. The Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. McCarthy, in writing to the chairman of the Select Committee to Study Censure Charges (Mr. Watkins) after the Select Committee had issued its report and before the report was presented to the Senate charging three members of the Select Committee with "deliberate deception" and "fraud" for failure to disqualify themselves; in stating to the press on November 4, 1954, that the special Senate session that was to begin November 8, 1954, was a "lynch-party"; in repeatedly describing this special Senate session as a "lynch bee" in a nationwide television and radio show on November 7, 1954; in stating to the public press on November 13, 1954, that the chairman of the Select Committee (Mr. Watkins) was guilty of "the most unusual, most cowardly things I've ever heard of" and stating further: "I expected he would be afraid to answer the questions, but didn't think he'd be stupid enough to make a public statement"; and in characterizing the said committee as the "unwitting handmaiden," "involuntary agent" and "attorneys-in-fact" of the Communist Party and in charging that the said committee in writing its report "imitated Communist methods -- that it distorted, misrepresented, and omitted in its effort to manufacture a plausible rationalization" in support of its recommendations to the Senate, which characterizations and charges were contained in a statement released to the press and inserted in the Congressional Record of November 10, 1954, acted contrary to senatorial ethics and tended to bring the Senate into dishonor and disrepute, to obstruct the constitutional processes of the Senate, and to impair its dignity; and such conduct is hereby condemned.

    Source: 83rd Congress, 2nd Session, Senate Resolution 301 (2 December 1954).

    http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/60.htm
     

Share This Page