Leftovers

Discussion in 'Food & Wine' started by Ringel05, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    Not what you're thinking of.

    I'm talking about the vegetable ends (throwaways), chicken/turkey bones, gristle, fat and skin.

    When I start prepping a chicken or turkey I take the excess cut off fat, onion "heads", celery and carrot discards and put them in a stock pot with water on medium low, salt as desired. I cover and turn off the burner at night then restart it in the AM. As the bird is consumed I add the bones and other throwaways plus more water as needed, (I generally strip the leftover meat from the bones on the second day). Continue cooking for another day or two, strain the cooled liquid into a container and refrigerate overnight. When it has set, skim the fat from the top and what you have left is a chicken or turkey gel. Put the gel in ice trays and freeze, then wrap the frozen, homemade "bullion" in plastic wrap.
     
  2. Zoom-boing
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    Zoom-boing Gold Member

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    Doesn't it get a little funky sitting out for several days?
     
  3. AllieBaba
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    AllieBaba BANNED

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    You're okay if you refrigerate it and don't let it sit at that optimum bacteria-producing heat, which I think is like 120 degrees or something; and if it's either frozen or trashed by the 4th day.

    The asians have a similar soup that's like a continual pot. But it truly is continual, and kept at a constant, high heat. They just keep adding stuff to it, but the heat is high enough that hopefully you don't die, and they call them like 3000-year soup or something.

    You do have to be really careful about adding new food to old, and thinking that makes it fresh, because it doesn't. But so long as it's frozen on the 4th day it should be okay. Just remember when you thaw it out...it already is x days old.
     
  4. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    Except at night when you cover it and turn it off it's constantly being cooked. Anything bad is killed. People have been doing this since before refrigeration except then they tended to use it right away. By properly wrapping and freezing the cubes, they will last up to six months.
    And no, I don't cook it longer than three days.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  5. Zoom-boing
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    Zoom-boing Gold Member

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    Not to be a dope but . . . how does it continue to cook after you turn off the heat? :confused:
     
  6. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    It stays warm for a few hours when covered, plus when you restart the cooking process anything that may have manifested itself is dead by the time you shut it off again. Besides if you're really worried about that potentiality then leave it on warm all night then turn it back up in the morning. Problem solved.
    One can continually cook it for two days, covering it at night to minimize water loss, adding water as needed then strain, refrigerate and freeze. Use a 6 to 8 quart stock pot so water loss will be minimal in relation to total amount.
     
  7. AllieBaba
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    It's that period of "hot-warm-cold" that we were taught to minimize so we'd not grow the deadly bacteria. Hot directly to the fridge - cool as quickly as possible. Date everything.
     
  8. Skull Pilot
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    I do much the same thing but I use a large crock pot and keep it on low so the stock never cools down and the lid keeps most of the moisture in.
     
  9. Paulie
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    Paulie Platinum Member

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    I made a donation to the Sunbeam Company C/O Crock Pot on behalf of my stomach.
     
  10. Ringel05
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    Ringel05 Diamond Member

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    Yeah, yeah, yeah, and I bet you use anti-bacterial soap also. I and millions of others have been doing this for countless generations without harm. Go figure. :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010

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