I will admit that humanity is better off within a warmer period

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Matthew, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. Matthew
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    Matthew Blue dog all the way!

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    Lets Admit that the little ice age was very unfavorable period for sustaining a billion plus humans and in fact the human population didn't grow above 1 billion until 1803 or near the end of this hellish period. Since then our ability to grow food has increased enough to feed up to near 7 billion humans and we're all much more happier for it.

    Life was also better before the little ice age within the Climate optimum and Med evil warm periods. These periods of great advancement from the first farming to the city and nation state...So There is a to cold and Maybe to hot too...I'm not saying the warmers are wrong to worry and in fact our good luck with a warming planet could run out sooner or later...As there is always to cold and to hot.

    So hopefully the warmers will agree that todays world is much more able to feed our population than the little ice age of 1300-1850, but to our skeptic friends there is of course a limit when some of the land we currently use could become too hot to grow food too. Which could limit us.

    So it is a balance. 2c of warming if we where to warm that much within the next 100-150 years would likely move our growing area's some...At least you would think.

    So warmers would you admit that the warmer world up to this point is better then what we had to deal with two centuries ago? And skeptics would you admit that there is a limit to how warm it could get before things could change in bad ways.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2010
  2. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Mathew, of course there is a point where the temperature would become too much for comfortable life. However, you need to define bad. Bad for people? Bad for plants? Bad for animals?
     
  3. Charles_Main
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    Charles_Main AR15 Owner

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    If we intend to live a long time on this planet. We better be prepared to deal with the effects of Warming and cooling. With our With our Human Input we will see both. History shows us this.

    If we were smart we would be planning on how to deal with rising oceans more, and thinking about how we can stop it less, Because in the end we can't stop it. Hot and warm periods will come and go, The Seas will rise and fall, and we better be prepared to adapt.

    Sure we can limit our emission and our effect on it, but even if we stop all emissions right now. The natural Cycles of the earth will not stop. Things will always be in changing and if we can not deal with it, we will fade away.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Were the warming moving at a rate that would not create the feedbacks that we are starting to see, I would welcome it.

    Rapid climate change, in either direction, creates major problems. The shifts created in atmospheric circulation means that areas are wetter or drier than previously, or worse yet, both, in cycles that we cannot predict.

    It is not so much moving our growing areas, as creating a situation in which the weather in those growing areas is completely unpredictable from year to year. For the climate does not change in a nice smooth linear curve, but more like a chaos graph.

    NOAA Paleoclimatology Program - Perspective on Abrupt climate Change


    The Younger Dryas is one of the most well-known examples of abrupt change. About 14,500 years ago, the Earth's climate began to shift from a cold glacial world to a warmer interglacial state. Partway through this transition, temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere suddenly returned to near-glacial conditions (Figure 6). This near-glacial period is called the Younger Dryas, named after a flower (Dryas octopetala) that grows in cold conditions and became common in Europe during this time. The end of the Younger Dryas, about 11,500 years ago, was particularly abrupt. In Greenland, temperatures rose 10° C (18° F) in a decade (Figure 6; Cuffey and Clow,
     

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