Historic Day in Education

Discussion in 'Education' started by PoliticalChic, May 17, 2010.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    January 12, 1948 US Supreme Court: Sipuel v Oklahoma State Bd of Regents, wherein the court moved cautiously toward outlawing segregation in education. ( Plessy v Ferguson: separate but equal, and finally...

    this day:

    May 17, 1954 Brown v Topeka Bd of Ed based on equal protection 14th Amendment.

    Two major events in education on the 1950’s: a) 1954 Brown decision of the Supreme Court, and b) Sputnik in 1957.
    Both events drew Washington deeper into education. The concept of local control was endangered.
    a. The fear that American had an educational quality problem was highlighted in the 1958 Rockefeller Fund report, spearheaded by John W. Gardner The Pursuit of Excellence.
    b. 1959, James P. Conant, The American High School, urged ‘comprehensive’ high schools with tracks for college prep, vocational, etc.

    The philosophical war rages between devotees of ‘progressive education’ i.e. John Dewey and William Heard Kilpatrick versus ‘essentialists’ such as Robert Maynard Hutchins (he encouraged liberal education based on the study of the great books of the Western tradition,), Mortimer Smith and Arthur Bestor (neotraditionalist, Educational Wastelands (1953) was his manifesto about declining educational standards).
    a. Bestor: US schools lacked serious content and rigor and neglected the core disciplines.
    b. Without school choice and voucers, parents have no vote on the matter.
     
  2. Dr.Traveler
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    Dr.Traveler Mathematician

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    Both events also pointed out how the States were blowing it when it came to education. That's why people were willing to let the Feds move towards more control over education.

    If you want to turn this around, you'll have to show:
    1. The Feds are blowing it.
    2. Local Government can do it better.

    You can make a case for 1. But if you look at States in the Southern Region and in the inner cities, you'll be hard pressed to make a case for 2.

    I don't honestly know what the solution is for Public Education. I feel it is important as it provides an "out" for poor kids willing to work hard. Whether a voucher system is the path to reform or not is a big question. I do know that as my son gets older, and closer to the point where I have to make the Public vs. Private school decision I get more and more sympathetic to vouchers as I'll probably cough up the funds for a Private school education for him.
     
  3. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Actually international results pretty much document "The Feds are blowing it." and of course, so are local controllers.

    Here in NY the unions are in charge, and probably around the nation, as well.


    And on a personal note, as in 'I do know that as my son gets older, ...' the plan should be to decide what outcome you desire, and how you will judge if it is fulfilled.

    We did just that, and decided that there is, to use a Progressive term, a 'Third Way'...no, not corporatism, home schooling.

    It takes a financial and time commitment, but the rewards are astounding. In addition to real education, as determined by you, the questions and direction that children determine is amazing.

    After all, after our children, what else is there?
     
  4. Dr.Traveler
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    Dr.Traveler Mathematician

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    Yep, home schooling is possible. My wife and I hold Ph'D's in Mathematics, so I'm pretty sure we can do a competent job teaching Math and Science.

    When we discuss that issue the biggest concern my wife and I have is that neither of us is very skilled at more social interactions, something a child does learn about in a school setting. How do you compensate for social interactions with home school? Do you encourage little league play, arrange play dates, etc? Or does your church have an active youth group?

    I think if we figured that aspect out, home schooling would become a very attractive option.
     
  5. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    My favorite subject!

    1. While we are both educated and continually educating, we were most concerned as how to teach the early grades. We searched around, looked at a number of curricula, and decided on the K12.com. They provide a well rounded, age appropriate set of subjects that used the computer, and spells out exactly what to say, and interesting worksheets. Further, they keep attendance records in case your state requires and an assessment each day.
    You can see sample lessons online.
    With your backgrounds, you may wish to add your own math ideas.

    2.Runs about $1k per year incl. textbooks and materials and access.

    3. Our children attend religious classes.

    4. We are involved with several homeschool groups, and have regular functions and outings arranged by parents. Several of the groups also have coop classes where they hire professional teachers for classes: we haven't joined any yet, but could do so for science lab classes.
    Last Thursday we took a historical tour of Green-Wood Cemetery, with a homeschool group. The kids wrote blogs about it.

    5. Teams: soccer, and karate, so far. Looking into tennis lessons currently.

    6. We work seven days a week, and finish formal school now, in May. We design our own classes and lots of reading for the summer. I must say that not only are the children very happy with the arrangement, but their friends- the ones in public school tell them "are you lucky."


    Note: the socialization thing is not a problem, and, in fact, neighbors have said that our children are the only ones who speak to adults... it seems that the public school kids tend to only deal with their peers.


    This is my experience. I'm sure you'll make the right decision.
     
  6. Dr.Traveler
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    Thanks for the replies. I'll be giving it thought. My son turns 2 in a few weeks, so I still have some time but this topic is never far from my mind. I grew up below the poverty line, and education made an enormous difference in my life.

    I didn't realize until I was an adult how lucky I got with my public education. The Calculus teacher in high school held a Ph'D and taught night classes at the local University. Many of the teachers held Masters degrees in their chosen field. There were very few discipline issues. I definitely received an education on par with some of the best private schools in the state.

    Looking around now, there simply isn't a public school of that caliber anymore. So I know as a parent I'll probably have to look into either private school or home schooling, and that really bothers me. I can afford that, but what about the parents that can't. It seems we are really failing the next generation here.

    Again, I don't know the solution to this problem. Many of the mathematics teachers I interact with as part of my job are literally giving everything they have to try to reach these kids. So what happens next?
     
  7. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Welcome...anytime.


    Every year is great with the kids, watching them grow, and change...but "My son turns 2..."
    Great, great year.
    We never had the 'terrible two's.' They were great.

    I agee, "how lucky I got with my public education"...and always good to appreciate. True, not the same any longer. Some of the older teachers, and retirees that I speak to are disappoined with the newest teacher. The desire may be there, but the education is rarely. My local high school is the one that graduated Ruth Bader-Ginsburg, Bernie Sanders, and Charles Schumer...maybe its the world that changed, and education was more important at another time.

    BTW, speak to private school teachers, who earn about half of what public school teachers do, and I wonder if you will find a difference outside of class size. Friends of ours who work full time find that they must do follow-up schooling at night.

    "...what about the parents that can't. It seems we are really failing the next generation here..." You know my attitude: most parents want the best education for their kids, so let them pick any venue, and take funding with the kids. A public education G.I.Bill.
    Parents will know if their school is working.
    That is the basis of liberty.
     

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