God’s law versus secular law. Which is moral?

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by GreatestIam, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. GreatestIam
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    GreatestIam VIP Member

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    God’s law versus secular law. Which is moral?

    Our literature is rife with criticisms of God’s laws denouncing them as immoral.
    This is mostly done by non-believers and secular law makers and even many believers. The whole world has rejected the morality of God’s law.

    Satan shall deceive the whole world. That is scripture.

    Believers say that God’s laws are moral; yet very few believers are trying to push for adoption of God’s laws by secular governments.

    If believers believed that God’s laws are moral, it follows that they would be trying to have them implemented by governments. Strangely, they do not.

    Can a believer believe in God yet not believe in his laws?

    No believer is living by God’s law.

    If believers believe in God’s laws, should believers be living by them?

    Law without punishment is impotent law.

    Should believers demand that secular law use God’s punishments where those few laws are basically identical?

    Regards
    DL
     
  2. TNHarley
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    TNHarley Gold Member

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    I dont know too many christians that are christians. Omish live by them.
     
  3. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Omish?
     
  4. TNHarley
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    TNHarley Gold Member

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    Amish
     
  5. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Ahh, well they sort of do.
    They may not have electricity and such in their homes but they do in their barns and business interests.
    They love cordless power tools.

    Not sure where that do not drive a car thing came from in the bible, but they seem to have no problem riding in the cars and such.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2012
  6. rosends
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    rosends VIP Member

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    there are, I feel, 2 versions of morality, and confusing these two is a problem.

    1 type of morality is the human construct -- the sense of propriety of things that allows us to coexist in a society. We often make laws to police this type of morality.

    the other type is the (often religious) notion of a transcendent morality which drives god's behavior and laws. Sometimes these come into conflict with man's morality and we have to reconcile the contradiction.

    But both, to 2 different definitions, are templates of morality.
     
  7. Connery
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    Connery BANNED Supporting Member

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    Religious law can never truly speak to all people where everyone gets the same rules. Religious law is about inclusion and exclusion.

    Secular law speaks to an entire population and provides and avenue for redress without qualification.

    Indeed, by design morality is a contrivance in both religious law and secular law.
     
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  8. rosends
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    rosends VIP Member

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    Secular law is also about inclusion and exclusion -- rules for citizens and non-citizens, or lawful subgroups and those beyond the law (felons can't vote I believe).

    But do you think that there is a transcendent morality which, if not god-based is somehow innate and encoded in our genetic make up?

    Is man's state of nature infused with any moral law or is it all construct?
     
  9. PratchettFan
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    PratchettFan Gold Member

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    Neither is moral. As far as I can tell, the primary difference between the two is that secular law is administered by courts and God's law is administered by a sword.
     
  10. Koios
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    Koios Recreational Kibitzer

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    Niether, and both. It merely depends on how it is used and what goals it endeavors to achieve.
     

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