Glaciers in Utah melting

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Chris, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    Glaciers on the iconic Teton Range are shrinking, researchers say, joining a growing list of glaciers in North America and beyond that are losing their surface area and potentially reducing the water supply for nearby regions.

    Two of the Tetons' biggest glaciers have lost more than 20 percent of their surface area since the late 1960s, three University of Wyoming researchers concluded after comparing old and new aerial photographs of the glaciers.

    The glaciers are a fairly substantial source of irrigation water, meaning the findings have wider implications than simply what the mountains look like to tourists by late summer. People in Wyoming and Idaho and to a lesser extent Utah use water from the glaciers.

    "From an engineering-water supply perspective, we look at them as frozen reservoirs," said Glenn Tootle, a University of Tennessee-Knoxville assistant professor and co-principal investigator of the study funded by the Wyoming Water Development Commission.

    The Wyoming Legislature appropriated $225,000 for the study in 2006, one of several water projects or studies lawmakers funded that year in the nation's fifth-driest state.

    The findings are consistent with shrinking glaciers elsewhere. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study found that three long-observed glaciers in Alaska and Washington state have been shrinking at a faster rate in recent years. Other scientists have predicted that Montana's Glacier National Park will be devoid of glaciers by 2030.

    Worldwide, the vast majority of glaciers measured below 15,000 feet have been shrinking in recent decades, said Richard Armstrong, a senior researcher with the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

    Researchers: shrinking Teton glaciers will affect Utah water - Salt Lake Tribune
     
  2. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    does al know? It's about time for his hysterics again.
     
  3. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Ice caps are melting rapidly - we all gonna die...

    Scientists sound alarm over rapid ice cap melt
    Sat, Nov 26, 2016 - Arctic scientists said that potentially faster melting of the ice cap risks triggering 19 “tipping points” in the region.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    [​IMG]


    Peru’s Cordillera Blanca contain the most dense concentration of glaciers in the tropics, but the ice is rapidly melting. An international research team is assessing how the retreat of the glaciers is affecting the region’s rivers and people.


    From the shade of an adobe house overlooking Peru's Santa River, Jimmy Melgarejo squints at the dual peaks of Mount Huascarán looming against a cloudless sky. “The snow keeps getting farther away,” says Melgarejo, a farmer worried about his livelihood. “It's moving up, little by little. When the snow disappears, there will be no water.”

    Throughout the Andes, millions of people voice the same concern as they watch climate change eat away at the mountain chain's icy mantle. But although everyone fears a water shortage, they do not know how quickly it will come or how severe it will be.

    Related stories
    More related stories

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists is now trying to provide some answers through a US$1-million project funded by the US National Science Foundation. The crew, which pulls together hydrologists, geochemists, geographers and historians, mainly from the United States and Canada, is tracking the fate of glacial meltwater as it runs from the mountains down to the ocean. Their goal is to develop models to forecast water flow and its effects on residents downstream. The rapid changes in the Andes “warrant a new kind of interdisciplinary, integrated study”, says geographer Bryan Mark of Ohio State University in Columbus, who is one of the principal investigators of the project. “We're trying to cross traditional boundaries, so we're not studying water separately from people.”

    Melting in the Andes: Goodbye glaciers

    The recession of the glaciers is a very serious matter for agriculture that depends on the water toward the end of summer. And in all the mountain ranges of the world, the glaciers are receding.
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Closer to home;

    The changing glaciers of Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington : implications for periglacial debris flows
    Ellinger, Jonathan R.
    [​IMG]
    File Name: EllingerJonathanR2011.pdf
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    URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1957/18018
    Date: 2010-08-30T21:35:23Z
    Abstract:
    Mountain glaciers are receding worldwide with numerous consequences including changing hydrology and geomorphology. This study focuses on changes in glacier area on Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington where damaging debris flows have occurred in glaciated basins. Landsat imagery is used to map debris-free ice on a decadal time scale from 1987 to 2005. Debris-free glacier ice is clearly delineated using a ratio of Landsat spectral bands in the near-infrared part of the spectrum (bands 4 & 5). Landsat scenes were chosen during the months of September and October to minimize snow cover left over from the accumulation season and maximize exposure of debris-free glacial ice. SNOTEL data were also used to find the lowest snow year for each decade to minimize the potential of misclassifying remnant snow as glacial ice. Changes in debris-free ice are mapped to produce the most up-to-date rates of glacier retreat. Average glacial slopes, derived from airborne LiDAR data are used to compute slope corrected debris-free ice areas for all glaciers. A threshold value for the Landsat NDGI scenes was selected based on threshold testing on the Eliot and Reid glaciers on Mt. Hood. Contradicting earlier studies that say the glaciers on Mt. Hood are receding faster than the glaciers on Mt. Rainier, results show that from 1987 to 2005 Mt. Rainier and Mt. Hood lost similar amounts of debris-free ice extent at 14.0% and 13.9%, respectively. For both Mt. Hood and Mt. Rainier the change in slope corrected debris-free ice area was greater than that of the projected area change due to the steep slopes of both mountains. For Mt. Rainier an increase in recession rate was shown from 1992-2005 compared to 1987-1992 while on Mt. Hood the opposite is seen. On Mt. Rainier it was found that highly fragmented glaciers at lower elevations such as the Inter, Pyramid, and the Van Trump Glaciers lost the highest percent of their original 1987 ice extent and were also shown to be associated with new debris flows in 2006. On Mt. Hood none of the 2006 debris flows initiated within zones of recent glacial recession, however, all debris flows from 2006 originated from streams with a direct connection to glaciers. The Newton Clark Glacier, having lost the most coverage of debris-free ice from 1987 to 2005, is also associated with the highest number of debris-flows in its drainage since 1980. Precipitation data for both mountains show no trend but there was a statistically significant increase in summer air temperature at Mt. Hood over the period 1984-2009. This study suggests that glaciers may play a role in the location of initiation sites, of debris flows, but there is not enough evidence to argue that glacier recession is responsible for producing debris flows.
    Description:

     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    It's about time for knownothing assholes like you to shut your idiot mouths.

    Northwest glaciers have that shrinking feeling

    BEND, Ore. — Between the North Sister and Middle Sister in Oregon's Cascade Range, Collier Glacier has advanced and receded for hundreds of thousands of years. But like many glaciers, it is headed in one direction these days: backward.

    It is in serious peril, says geologist Ellen Morris Bishop of the Fossil-based Oregon Paleo Lands Institute. "We have basically a really sad picture of Collier Glacier today."

    Geologists blame among other things a warming climate, altering the landscape and perhaps the availability of water to high-elevation ecosystems. Collier is shrinking faster than most of the 35 glaciers in the state.

    "Now everything is just in a chaotic shrink," Bishop said.

    This summer she led a climate change-themed tour of the Central Oregon Cascades, starting from McKenzie Pass and heading south. Volcanic activity built the Cascades, but over eons the glaciers have worn them down.

    At the glacier's base is a moraine, or a ridge of rocks, deposited by the slowly moving glacier when it was bigger. Today an empty valley fills the space between the ridge and the glacial edge.

    "This was a full valley in 1906," Bishop said. Since then it has retreated more than a mile.
     
  7. AnCap'n_Murica
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    AnCap'n_Murica Gold Member

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    The Tetons are on the WY & ID border, not in Utah.
     
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  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Cascade glaciers, Washington state.
     
  9. AnCap'n_Murica
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    AnCap'n_Murica Gold Member

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    Yeah, and there still are no glaciers in Utah.
     
  10. Old Rocks
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