An amazingly small giant leap into quantum computing

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Liability, Feb 20, 2012.

  1. Liability
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    Liability Locked Account. Supporting Member

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    Sorry for that messed up thread headline, but I have been reading a good book addressing this very topic.

    I just saw a linked story from Drudge.

    Here's the link:

    Transistor Made Using a Single Atom May Help Beat Moore's Law

    It could (although, so far only in theory) open the doors to QUANTUM Computing.

    The book I have been reading (worth getting, by the way) is: The Singularity is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, by Ray Kurzweil.
     
  2. theDoctorisIn
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    theDoctorisIn Senior Mod Staff Member Senior USMB Moderator

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    That's cool as shit. I mean, it's years away from practical application (-391 degrees Fahrenheit), but an amazing step.

    Moore's Law has always fascinated me.

    And I'm probably going to buy that book you mentioned as well.
     
  3. Liability
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    Liability Locked Account. Supporting Member

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    I got it on my Nook. Since I am not a scientist, it is pretty "dense" reading material, but I am still enjoying it quite a bit. It is fascinating.
     
  4. konradv
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    konradv Gold Member

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    I was thinking about a similar concept regarding fusion power. What if the reaction could be pared down to two nuclei at a time, repeated over and over. The present system involves many lasers trained on many nuclei with containment being a major problem. It would seem to be a much easier task to contain two nuclei and, if we could get the turnover up to machine gun speeds, we just might have something.
     
  5. Liability
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    Liability Locked Account. Supporting Member

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    Ok.

    The chances of that post not sailing way the hell over my head are smaller than the nuclei you speak of.

    But, still. The topic is very interesting.

    I need good science authors to discuss the topics in a digestible format.

    <<(Looks around for rderp to declare that I am not one of the 6%.)>>
     
  6. stans
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    stans Member

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    -391F is very easily achievable and relatively inexpensive. Liquid helium (about -456F) is commercially available.
     
  7. theDoctorisIn
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    theDoctorisIn Senior Mod Staff Member Senior USMB Moderator

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    In a lab setting, certainly.

    It's a long way from practical use though.
     
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