CDZ Actual 1%/Mythical 1%/Wannabe 1%

Discussion in 'Clean Debate Zone' started by william the wie, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    I considered most of my classmates (and teachers) to be morons, so I guess I was guilty of Apebashing. Still am.
     
  2. Xelor
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    Xelor Gold Member

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    To set down a framework by which I understand the term "one percent" as it's used in discussing a segment of society, it refers to annual household income, not wealth/net worth. In contrast, the contextual meaning of "millionaire" and "billionaire" refers to net worth/wealth, usually not including one's primary residence, though some tabulators of that statistic include one's home(s) and other non-investible assets.
    • Millionaires --> A lot of folks are millionaires, more if one includes their primary residence.

    • Earn $1M+/year combined in active and passive income --> Not a lot of folks/households -- something around 250K to 500K -- earn this much income annually, fewer still earn that much in wages.

      Public company executive compensation often enough provides more as non-salary compensation than it does in salary. Earnings from things like, for example, the exercise of stock options and subsequent sale of the stock purchased is voluntary. If the exec doesn't exercise the options prior to their expiration, that component of their total compensation is foregone. Executive salary, in fact, hasn't really increased all that much over the past 50 years; however non-salary compensation has skyrocketed.

    • "One Percenters" --> Almost everyone knows someone who is part of a "one percent" household.

      It really doesn't take much at all to be part of the "one percent." One goes to college and does well (3.6+ GPA), takes a job that has a decent career path, performs well in their job, perhaps weds someone who's done the same, earns positive returns on one's investments and savings, and "voila," 10 to 15 years later one has household income sufficient to make one a "one percenter." What's somewhat more difficult, though not by any means impossible, is being a sole breadwinner in a household and earning enough to be a "one percenter."
    What?

    Would please define what you mean by "internal tax flight" and "International tax flight?"

    What do I expect to see with regard to what?
     
  3. jwoodie
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    jwoodie Gold Member Supporting Member

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    What is the significance of the term "one percenter" other than than as a demagogic political concoction?
     

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