Who are the Israelis?

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The One State Solution Between Israel and Palestine

Interview with Yinon Kehati, founder of the The Home

 
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Mass prayers organized for Jews buried in Arab countries

Israel's Diaspora Minister calls on Jews around the world to join in event marking expulsion of Jews from Arab countries.

Diaspora and Israeli organizations and communities representing millions of Jews around the world will participate in a mass Kaddish (the mourners’ prayer) and say a specially designed Azkara (a memorial prayer) this Shabbat for Jews buried in inaccessible Arab countries across the Middle East and North Africa.

The date was chosen as the closest Shabbat to November 30th, which is the Day to Commemorate the Departure and Expulsion of Jews from Arab Countries and Iran, a date officially marked by the State of Israel and Jewish communities around the world.

So far, over 100 organizations and communities have signed up at www.KaddishInitiative.com , including the Israeli umbrella organization for Jews from Arab countries, representing millions of people in the Jewish State.

The Minister of Diaspora Affairs Omer Yankelevich has joined the call for Jews around the world to recite the prayers. “A fundamental cornerstone of the Jewish tradition is our collective memory. Therefore, I call on Jewish communities around the world to join in this global Shabbat of Remembrance,” Minister Yankelevich wrote in a letter of support for the initiative.

“By reciting the Mourner’s Kaddish and an azkara on the Shabbat of November 28, we will stand united in solidarity in honor of those we cannot physically pay our respects to.”

Over 11,000 rabbis, communal and organizational leaders and others have downloaded the Azkara prayer from the website ‘The Kaddish Initiative’, ranging from haredi, Hasidic, Modern Orthodox, Conservative and Reform, Ashkenazi, Sephardi and Mizrahi, and from every continent.

The Kaddish Initiative began in 2017, when the person who ran the Miss Iraq beauty contest lost her funding and sponsorship when that year’s winner took a selfie with Miss Israel. They learned that the first Miss Iraq was Renée Dangoor, who was crowned in 1947 in Baghdad, and her son, David Dangoor, is a prominent philanthropist and businessman, living in London.

Sass Peress, a cousin of Dangoor’s was contacted, who asked if in return he could be sent some photos of his grandfather’s grave in a Jewish cemetery in Sadr City, Baghdad. When he realized the state of the cemetery and cemeteries in Jewish communities around the Arab world, which could not be visited by relatives, he formulated the idea of a mass Kaddish for those who could not physically visit their departed loved ones.

“More than a religious event, the recitation of the mass Kaddish and Azkara are an important display of solidarity with the Jews of the Middle East and North Africa, and our history should be acknowledged and never forgotten, to make sure it is never repeated,” Sass Peress said about the idea.

This year, David Dangoor became involved and set up and supported a concerted and organized outreach to the wider Jewish world to place the annual Kaddish on the global Jewish calendar.

“Unlike the case of other Jewish tragedies, there is no communal showing of religious solidarity for the exodus and expulsion of Jews from Arab countries,” Dangoor said. “It is vital, thus, that this be a widely recognized initiative to say these prayers annually in synagogues and Jewish institutions in Israel and around the world. Even in communities where there are few Jews from the Middle East and North Africa, these prayers and a display of religious solidarity are vital for breaking down the barriers between our different communities.”


 

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Positivity and the Temple: Join the Temple Rebellion!

Rebulding the Holy Temple is possible - time to begin, even if it means rebelling against the Chief Rabbinate and its Rabbinic Council.



The miraculous liberation of the Temple Mount in 1967 was a game changer. For 2000 years Jews have prayed for the moment when we can rebuild the Holy Temple, yet, fifty three years after liberating the Temple Mount, the Holy Temple remains unbuilt.

Why?

The Orthodox religious establishment in Israel and Israel's Chief Rabbinate, are still not on board. Justifications for not building are offered, but in our view, they are not built on the words of either the written Torah or the Oral Torah.

The transition from exile to redemption which has taken place over the past seventy years has passed over many of the great rabbis of our generation, some of whom cite halakhic opinions they believe prevent ascending the Temple Mount, and who remain unwilling to accept either the privilege or the responsibility of having possession of the Temple Mount.

But many other people, rabbis included, are ready, willing and able to begin the rebuilding of the Holy Temple today! There are times when the establishment is out of step with reality. In such times it is up to the people to take up the cause, in spite of the establishment's misgivings.

Join the Holy Temple rebellion!

 

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No'a Kirel with 'Amir Benayoun and Nasrin Bracha Kadri

song written by Shlomi Shabbat

 
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P F Tinmore

P F Tinmore

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The One State Solution Between Israel and Palestine

Interview with Yinon Kehati, founder of the The Home

Of course Caroline Glick. Ali Abunimah, and others have visions of one state.

There is already one state. Israel runs everything.
 

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The One State Solution Between Israel and Palestine

Interview with Yinon Kehati, founder of the The Home

Of course Caroline Glick. Ali Abunimah, and others have visions of one state.

There is already one state. Israel runs everything.
Israel vs. the competing Islamic terrorist franchises. The difference between success and failure.
 

rylah

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Lookie lookie

a video cut in the middle,
Abdul says it's a 'check point' and a 'peaceful protest',
but instead the video shows people blocking an open road.

And while the man is squeeling in the ambulance,
no camera is being blocked and the women are standing and watching calmly.

Something doesn't add up.

On the other hand, when I think about it, it just reminds me of how much I owe these soldiers when in such situations they make decision of what has to be done, regardless of how it may appear on camera.

 

rylah

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When will Jewish refugees from Arab nations get the justice they deserve?

U.N.GA Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242 do not define the refugees referred to. Jews must be included.

When the mainstream media and United Nations refer to refugees in the context of the Israel-Palestinian conflict, they’re usually referring only to the Arab so-called Palestinian refugees. While much can be said about the Palestinian Arab refugees and their controversially unique and privileged status globally, the media and international organizations rarely address hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forcibly exiled from their homes and communities in the Middle East and North Africa during the mid-20th century.

While many, if not most, Palestinian Arab refugees had only arrived in their new homes in the Holy Land during the previous century, Jews had been living in places like Iraq for over 2,500 years. In fact, the Jewish presence in the wider Middle East predates the rise of Islam—as well as the Arab conquest, occupation and colonization of the region—by over 1,000 years.

In the early part of the 20th century, some 850,000 Jews lived in what is today known as the “Arab world.” However, today there are no more than a few thousand Jews left in that region—meaning this was one of the most successful ethnic-cleansing events in modern history.

In 2014, the Israeli Knesset passed a law mandating that Nov. 30 would be the Day to Commemorate the Expulsion of Jews from the Arab Countries and Iran. The Jewish refugees from Arab countries issue remains an unresolved one, even though international law and United Nations resolutions mandate a redress.

On two separate occasions the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) ruled that Jews fleeing from Arab countries were indeed “bona fide” refugees who fell under its mandate. Many of the most pertinent and relevant resolutions on the conflict that reference refugees—including U.N. General Assembly Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242—do so without defining the type of refugee. This means that such resolutions—whether referencing compensation or assistance—can and should also apply to Jewish refugees.

Meanwhile, there have been 172 resolutions specifically on Palestinian Arab refugees, 13 U.N. agencies and organizations mandated or newly created to provide protection and relief to Palestinian refugees and tens of billions of dollars disbursed by the international community to provide services and assistance to Palestinian refugees.

During that same period, the U.N. offered no specific resolutions, no support by U.N. agencies nor any financial assistance from the international community to reduce the suffering of Jewish refugees from Arab countries.


Unlike Palestinian Arab refugees, the Jews from Arab countries were not involved as combatants, Jewish leaders had not called for the destruction of the countries they lived in nor the annihilation of their inhabitants, and were not even in a theater of war. They lived as law-abiding citizens, under repressive dhimmi subjugation—a special discriminatory legal system for Jews, who had to pay special anti-Semitic taxes and endure pogroms and massacres.

Overnight, in 1946—two years prior to Israel’s declaration of independence—thanks to a decision by the Arab League, all Jews in member states were considered enemies. Their citizenships were revoked, their bank accounts were frozen, tens of thousands were thrown out of certain professions and many imprisoned, simply because of their identity.
While the number of 1948 Palestinian Arab refugees is around two thirds of the number of Jewish refugees, the difference in personal and communal assets was stark. Though the average Palestinian Arab refugee was rural and had few assets, the Jews of places like Baghdad and Cairo were urban, cosmopolitan and wealthy.

According to the research undertaken by an international accountancy firm, the total assets of these dispossessed Jews in today’s currency would be worth around $250 billion. The calculations took into account land, real estate in cities and villages, business value, loss of income and income potential, movable property and Jewish public and community property.

In 2009, the U.S. Congress passed a bill recognizing the plight of these Jewish refugees, noting that for any “comprehensive Middle East peace agreement to be credible and enduring, that agreement must address and resolve all outstanding issues relating to the legitimate rights of refugees, including Jews, Christians and other populations displaced from countries in the Middle East.”

The U.S. resolution encourages the president and administration to mention Jewish and other refugees when mentioning Palestinian refugees in international forums. This was followed by a law in the Knesset that also mandated that the Israeli government bring up the issue of the Jewish refugees whenever the issue of refugees is raised.

Most Jews in Israel are Mizrahim (literally meaning “Eastern”)—from the Middle East and North Africa. They or their descendants were kicked out of their homes with next to nothing, and many were murdered or died during their flight.

Israel, as the national homeland of the Jewish people, took them in as it did all Jews fleeing persecution, and helped them integrate and be absorbed to their new-old home, where they created new lives for themselves. This does not, however, mean their pain and suffering should be forgotten, or that redress should not be demanded.

The crux of this conflict—and the reluctance of media and international bodies to address it—has always been about recognizing the Jews as a nation who reconstituted national sovereignty in their indigenous and ancestral homeland. The attacks and ethnic cleansing of Jews in Arab countries was one of the most egregious examples of the violent rejectionism of Jewish human rights by Arab leaders.

While some measures—like the Clinton Parameters, guidelines for an end to the conflict presented by then-President Bill Clinton in 2000—did refer to an international fund for both Arab and Jewish refugees displaced by the conflict, the issue remains on the sidelines.

Ideas such as an international compensation fund, or one funded by Arab countries that expelled the Jews, or the proposal for one refugee crisis to annul the other, have all been raised at one point or another.

Regardless, in order for the Israel-Arab conflict—including the Israel-Palestinian conflict—to be resolved, the crime of ethnic cleansing of Jews has to be acknowledged. Then generous redress must be demanded and granted.


 
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Ancient Jews Rebuild the Temple

They may lack the celeb status of other biblical figures, but Ezra and Nehemiah were major players in the Jewish story. Despite being relegated to the last pages of the Bible, they were men on a mission: Nehemiah to rebuild the ruined city of Jerusalem; Ezra to rebuild the Jewish soul. And they stopped at nothing to succeed.

 

rylah

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Shai Tzabari with Yuval Dayan - Zman Lisloah

The song was performed as part of Makor Rishon's "Zeh Hazman Lisloah" project,
which presents new adaptations of the songs of Slihot we are all familiar with.

Producer and director: Ya'akov Asraf
Recorded at the Music Museum

 
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When will Jewish refugees from Arab nations get the justice they deserve?

U.N.GA Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242 do not define the refugees referred to. Jews must be included.

When the mainstream media and United Nations refer to refugees in the context of the Israel-Palestinian conflict, they’re usually referring only to the Arab so-called Palestinian refugees. While much can be said about the Palestinian Arab refugees and their controversially unique and privileged status globally, the media and international organizations rarely address hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forcibly exiled from their homes and communities in the Middle East and North Africa during the mid-20th century.

While many, if not most, Palestinian Arab refugees had only arrived in their new homes in the Holy Land during the previous century, Jews had been living in places like Iraq for over 2,500 years. In fact, the Jewish presence in the wider Middle East predates the rise of Islam—as well as the Arab conquest, occupation and colonization of the region—by over 1,000 years.

In the early part of the 20th century, some 850,000 Jews lived in what is today known as the “Arab world.” However, today there are no more than a few thousand Jews left in that region—meaning this was one of the most successful ethnic-cleansing events in modern history.

In 2014, the Israeli Knesset passed a law mandating that Nov. 30 would be the Day to Commemorate the Expulsion of Jews from the Arab Countries and Iran. The Jewish refugees from Arab countries issue remains an unresolved one, even though international law and United Nations resolutions mandate a redress.

On two separate occasions the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) ruled that Jews fleeing from Arab countries were indeed “bona fide” refugees who fell under its mandate. Many of the most pertinent and relevant resolutions on the conflict that reference refugees—including U.N. General Assembly Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242—do so without defining the type of refugee. This means that such resolutions—whether referencing compensation or assistance—can and should also apply to Jewish refugees.

Meanwhile, there have been 172 resolutions specifically on Palestinian Arab refugees, 13 U.N. agencies and organizations mandated or newly created to provide protection and relief to Palestinian refugees and tens of billions of dollars disbursed by the international community to provide services and assistance to Palestinian refugees.

During that same period, the U.N. offered no specific resolutions, no support by U.N. agencies nor any financial assistance from the international community to reduce the suffering of Jewish refugees from Arab countries.


Unlike Palestinian Arab refugees, the Jews from Arab countries were not involved as combatants, Jewish leaders had not called for the destruction of the countries they lived in nor the annihilation of their inhabitants, and were not even in a theater of war. They lived as law-abiding citizens, under repressive dhimmi subjugation—a special discriminatory legal system for Jews, who had to pay special anti-Semitic taxes and endure pogroms and massacres.

Overnight, in 1946—two years prior to Israel’s declaration of independence—thanks to a decision by the Arab League, all Jews in member states were considered enemies. Their citizenships were revoked, their bank accounts were frozen, tens of thousands were thrown out of certain professions and many imprisoned, simply because of their identity.
While the number of 1948 Palestinian Arab refugees is around two thirds of the number of Jewish refugees, the difference in personal and communal assets was stark. Though the average Palestinian Arab refugee was rural and had few assets, the Jews of places like Baghdad and Cairo were urban, cosmopolitan and wealthy.

According to the research undertaken by an international accountancy firm, the total assets of these dispossessed Jews in today’s currency would be worth around $250 billion. The calculations took into account land, real estate in cities and villages, business value, loss of income and income potential, movable property and Jewish public and community property.

In 2009, the U.S. Congress passed a bill recognizing the plight of these Jewish refugees, noting that for any “comprehensive Middle East peace agreement to be credible and enduring, that agreement must address and resolve all outstanding issues relating to the legitimate rights of refugees, including Jews, Christians and other populations displaced from countries in the Middle East.”

The U.S. resolution encourages the president and administration to mention Jewish and other refugees when mentioning Palestinian refugees in international forums. This was followed by a law in the Knesset that also mandated that the Israeli government bring up the issue of the Jewish refugees whenever the issue of refugees is raised.

Most Jews in Israel are Mizrahim (literally meaning “Eastern”)—from the Middle East and North Africa. They or their descendants were kicked out of their homes with next to nothing, and many were murdered or died during their flight.

Israel, as the national homeland of the Jewish people, took them in as it did all Jews fleeing persecution, and helped them integrate and be absorbed to their new-old home, where they created new lives for themselves. This does not, however, mean their pain and suffering should be forgotten, or that redress should not be demanded.

The crux of this conflict—and the reluctance of media and international bodies to address it—has always been about recognizing the Jews as a nation who reconstituted national sovereignty in their indigenous and ancestral homeland. The attacks and ethnic cleansing of Jews in Arab countries was one of the most egregious examples of the violent rejectionism of Jewish human rights by Arab leaders.

While some measures—like the Clinton Parameters, guidelines for an end to the conflict presented by then-President Bill Clinton in 2000—did refer to an international fund for both Arab and Jewish refugees displaced by the conflict, the issue remains on the sidelines.

Ideas such as an international compensation fund, or one funded by Arab countries that expelled the Jews, or the proposal for one refugee crisis to annul the other, have all been raised at one point or another.

Regardless, in order for the Israel-Arab conflict—including the Israel-Palestinian conflict—to be resolved, the crime of ethnic cleansing of Jews has to be acknowledged. Then generous redress must be demanded and granted.


international organizations rarely address hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forcibly exiled from their homes and communities in the Middle East and North Africa during the mid-20th century.
Where is their BDS? I'll join.
 

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"The crux of this conflict—and the reluctance of media and international bodies to address it—has always been about recognizing the Jews as a nation who reconstituted national sovereignty in their indigenous and ancestral homeland. The attacks and ethnic cleansing of Jews in Arab countries was one of the most egregious examples of the violent rejectionism of Jewish human rights by Arab leaders."
When will Jewish refugees from Arab nations get the justice they deserve?

 

rylah

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When will Jewish refugees from Arab nations get the justice they deserve?

U.N.GA Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242 do not define the refugees referred to. Jews must be included.

When the mainstream media and United Nations refer to refugees in the context of the Israel-Palestinian conflict, they’re usually referring only to the Arab so-called Palestinian refugees. While much can be said about the Palestinian Arab refugees and their controversially unique and privileged status globally, the media and international organizations rarely address hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forcibly exiled from their homes and communities in the Middle East and North Africa during the mid-20th century.

While many, if not most, Palestinian Arab refugees had only arrived in their new homes in the Holy Land during the previous century, Jews had been living in places like Iraq for over 2,500 years. In fact, the Jewish presence in the wider Middle East predates the rise of Islam—as well as the Arab conquest, occupation and colonization of the region—by over 1,000 years.

In the early part of the 20th century, some 850,000 Jews lived in what is today known as the “Arab world.” However, today there are no more than a few thousand Jews left in that region—meaning this was one of the most successful ethnic-cleansing events in modern history.

In 2014, the Israeli Knesset passed a law mandating that Nov. 30 would be the Day to Commemorate the Expulsion of Jews from the Arab Countries and Iran. The Jewish refugees from Arab countries issue remains an unresolved one, even though international law and United Nations resolutions mandate a redress.

On two separate occasions the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) ruled that Jews fleeing from Arab countries were indeed “bona fide” refugees who fell under its mandate. Many of the most pertinent and relevant resolutions on the conflict that reference refugees—including U.N. General Assembly Resolution 194 and U.N. Security Council Resolution 242—do so without defining the type of refugee. This means that such resolutions—whether referencing compensation or assistance—can and should also apply to Jewish refugees.

Meanwhile, there have been 172 resolutions specifically on Palestinian Arab refugees, 13 U.N. agencies and organizations mandated or newly created to provide protection and relief to Palestinian refugees and tens of billions of dollars disbursed by the international community to provide services and assistance to Palestinian refugees.

During that same period, the U.N. offered no specific resolutions, no support by U.N. agencies nor any financial assistance from the international community to reduce the suffering of Jewish refugees from Arab countries.


Unlike Palestinian Arab refugees, the Jews from Arab countries were not involved as combatants, Jewish leaders had not called for the destruction of the countries they lived in nor the annihilation of their inhabitants, and were not even in a theater of war. They lived as law-abiding citizens, under repressive dhimmi subjugation—a special discriminatory legal system for Jews, who had to pay special anti-Semitic taxes and endure pogroms and massacres.

Overnight, in 1946—two years prior to Israel’s declaration of independence—thanks to a decision by the Arab League, all Jews in member states were considered enemies. Their citizenships were revoked, their bank accounts were frozen, tens of thousands were thrown out of certain professions and many imprisoned, simply because of their identity.
While the number of 1948 Palestinian Arab refugees is around two thirds of the number of Jewish refugees, the difference in personal and communal assets was stark. Though the average Palestinian Arab refugee was rural and had few assets, the Jews of places like Baghdad and Cairo were urban, cosmopolitan and wealthy.

According to the research undertaken by an international accountancy firm, the total assets of these dispossessed Jews in today’s currency would be worth around $250 billion. The calculations took into account land, real estate in cities and villages, business value, loss of income and income potential, movable property and Jewish public and community property.

In 2009, the U.S. Congress passed a bill recognizing the plight of these Jewish refugees, noting that for any “comprehensive Middle East peace agreement to be credible and enduring, that agreement must address and resolve all outstanding issues relating to the legitimate rights of refugees, including Jews, Christians and other populations displaced from countries in the Middle East.”

The U.S. resolution encourages the president and administration to mention Jewish and other refugees when mentioning Palestinian refugees in international forums. This was followed by a law in the Knesset that also mandated that the Israeli government bring up the issue of the Jewish refugees whenever the issue of refugees is raised.

Most Jews in Israel are Mizrahim (literally meaning “Eastern”)—from the Middle East and North Africa. They or their descendants were kicked out of their homes with next to nothing, and many were murdered or died during their flight.

Israel, as the national homeland of the Jewish people, took them in as it did all Jews fleeing persecution, and helped them integrate and be absorbed to their new-old home, where they created new lives for themselves. This does not, however, mean their pain and suffering should be forgotten, or that redress should not be demanded.

The crux of this conflict—and the reluctance of media and international bodies to address it—has always been about recognizing the Jews as a nation who reconstituted national sovereignty in their indigenous and ancestral homeland. The attacks and ethnic cleansing of Jews in Arab countries was one of the most egregious examples of the violent rejectionism of Jewish human rights by Arab leaders.

While some measures—like the Clinton Parameters, guidelines for an end to the conflict presented by then-President Bill Clinton in 2000—did refer to an international fund for both Arab and Jewish refugees displaced by the conflict, the issue remains on the sidelines.

Ideas such as an international compensation fund, or one funded by Arab countries that expelled the Jews, or the proposal for one refugee crisis to annul the other, have all been raised at one point or another.

Regardless, in order for the Israel-Arab conflict—including the Israel-Palestinian conflict—to be resolved, the crime of ethnic cleansing of Jews has to be acknowledged. Then generous redress must be demanded and granted.


international organizations rarely address hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forcibly exiled from their homes and communities in the Middle East and North Africa during the mid-20th century.
Where is their BDS? I'll join.
Unlike Arabs,
they're are not seeking for exlusive domination over the entire middle east.
 
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rylah

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Palestinians & Israelis LISTEN To Each Other

In collaboration with البيت הבית The Home & Vision

Friendships don't matter. That is not the problem.
The problem is that there're too many 3rd parties invested in prolonging the conflict, at the expense of all invovled, purely for their selfish interests and feeling of self-importance.

At some point, one has to have the integrity to say "there's a limit to the value of my opinion and undertanding", especially regarding conflicts in a country one has never visited.

I don't have the habit of dictating my opinions like that to anyone abroad,
but you seem to come from the perspective that you know more than the people invovled.
 

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Shefitah with Motti Taka - 'Ma Hashuv Hayom'

"Ma Hashuv Hayom" - What important is today...

 

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