Where Is The Outrage From The Left?

red states rule

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Once again, the liberal meda and the "civil rights leaders" are very silent on racial remarks made by a liberal.

It is becoming apparent, if you are a liberal, you can utter any racist comment you want without any serious penalty.

Sen George Allen was on the front page of the Washington Post for three day in a row about a "racist" remark. but not a word on Mr Young



Young to Quit Wal-Mart Group After Racial Remarks
By Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
August 18, 2006


Andrew Young, the civil rights leader and former U.N. ambassador, said Thursday that he would resign as head of a Wal-Mart advocacy group, acknowledging "demagogic" remarks about Jewish, Asian and Arab business owners.

Young, 74, has been lobbying minority groups and civic leaders to accept Wal-Mart stores in their neighborhoods, a relationship that has drawn criticism from other African American leaders. In an interview published in Thursday's Los Angeles Sentinel, he was asked about the retailer's role in displacing mom-and-pop stores.


"Well, I think they should; they ran the 'mom-and-pop' stores out of my neighborhood," he told the Sentinel, the oldest and largest black-owned weekly newspaper in the West.

"But you see those are the people who have been overcharging us — selling us stale bread, and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans and now it's Arabs, very few black people own these stores."

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said that although it did not ask for Young's resignation, it supported his decision to step down.

"We are appalled by these comments," spokeswoman Mona Williams said. "We are also dismayed that they would come from someone who has worked so hard for so many years for equal rights in this country."

Young, in an interview Thursday night from his Atlanta home, expressed regret.

"I understand I've created a whole firestorm out there," Young said. "It's unfortunate and I should not have said it, and I apologize for it. It has not been my experience or my meaning."

Community leaders condemned his remarks.

"Paid Wal-Mart spokesman Andrew Young's racist comments are not only an affront to the religious and ethnic groups he attacked, but to the growing multiracial movement in Los Angeles and other cities that has a starkly different vision than Young and Wal-Mart's 'any job is a good job' mantra," said Danny Feingold, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.

The alliance was part of a coalition of activists that two years ago defeated Wal-Mart's bid to build a store in Inglewood.

Amanda Susskind, regional director for the Los Angeles Anti-Defamation League, said that although she was disturbed by Young's comments, she was relieved to see his full and unequivocal apology.

"In Los Angeles, where we're all living together in this incredibly multicultural city, it's not productive for us to categorize each other in such hateful ways," Susskind said. "Someone in his position needs to be aware of the responsibility of modeling behavior."

The giant retailer from Bentonville, Ark., is eager to burnish its image as it tries to expand in coastal and urban markets beyond its Southern and Midwestern base. It has been under financial pressure; just this week, it reported its first quarterly decline in profit in 10 years.

Wal-Mart scored a coup in February when it hired Young — an ordained minister and former mayor of Atlanta — to head Working Families for Wal-Mart, a group funded by the retailer to counter rising criticism by unions and community activists.

A group of Young's fellow pastors publicly criticized him for siding with Wal-Mart, saying that the company's pay and benefits do little to help the poor entry-level workers who form the bulk of the company's 1.3 million domestic employees.

Still, other black leaders have held out hope that the company's plans for urban expansion will revitalize poor neighborhoods by offering jobs, shopping alternatives and low prices — the reason former Los Angeles Urban League President John Mack gave four years ago for supporting the company's opening of a store in the Crenshaw district.

Young, who was in Los Angeles last week to meet with city officials and reporters on Wal-Mart's behalf, has stood fast in his position that the company helps working people, including African Americans.

Although Wal-Mart moved quickly Thursday to distance itself from Young's comments, the imbroglio offered critics another opportunity to jab at the company.

"Andrew Young's statements are offensive and wrong," said Nu Wexler of Wal-Mart Watch, a union-backed group in Washington. "Wal-Mart hired Young to conduct outreach to minority communities, and he's insulting and demeaning them instead. The small, family-owned grocers that Young dismisses are the economic backbone of many urban neighborhoods, and they provide a valuable service to the communities they represent."

On Thursday, Young said he was trying to describe the continuing generational and ethnic turnover of small local stores. Clarifying his remarks to the Sentinel, he asserted that many small stores in his neighborhood weren't shuttered because of Wal-Mart but were sold by elderly owners who retired.

And although his own neighborhood's small stores weren't owned by gougers selling inferior goods, other urban dwellers have faced that problem, Young said — a sentiment echoed by many urban leaders. Young said he was trying to explain that Wal-Mart can solve that problem.

"I guess I was sort of being confronted and challenged for supporting the big monster Wal-Mart, as they call it," Young said. "I was attempting to say that these large shops have been good for my community, and in this meeting I said it too quick. And instead of giving a long explanation, it was a racist shorthand, which was wrong."

During his long career, Young has faced controversy in his life as a politician and as a businessman.

In 1997, under contact with shoemaker Nike Inc., Young was criticized for touring factories with company interpreters and saying he found no widespread abuse of workers, an assertion challenged by many labor groups.

Two decades earlier, he was forced to resign as President Carter's U.N. ambassador after he held an unauthorized meeting with the Palestine Liberation Organization.

Young on Thursday asked for forgiveness for his comments.

"That's not how I feel and not how I am, but it is a demagogic statement," he said.

"It's the kind of statement that I have always spoken and worked against."

http://www.latimes.com/news/printed...8,1,1856004.story?coll=la-headlines-frontpage
 

GotZoom

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He is an African-American.

He gets a free "say anything you want" pass.

If a white conservative said it...
 
OP
red states rule

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White liberals get a pas as well

Do you recall the liberal media outrage over Hillary's "Gandhi ran a gas station" remark?

Or Joe Binden commenting who runs all the 7-11's in his state?

This is another example of the selective outrage from the PC liberal media
 
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red states rule

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Here is the Joe Biden remark that was ignored by the MSM liberal media....


Garrulous Sen. Joe Biden, D-Del., has once again planted his foot firmly in his mouth, and is scrambling to spin his videotaped racial slur that denigrates his state's growing population of people who hail from India.


But you'd never know it if your relied on the New York Times, Washington Post, or the rest of the mainstream media. Too busy betraying America's secrets to our enemies, none of them printed a word about Biden's gaffe.



Biden's comments were captured by C-Span cameras during a June event in New Hampshire where the likely 2008 presidential candidate was once again making the rounds with voters in this important primary state.


During a conversation with an Indian-American political activist, Biden said: "In Delaware, the largest growth of population is Indian-Americans, moving from India. You cannot go to a 7/11 or a Dunkin' Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent. I’m not joking."

Biden's reference to the stereotype that the nation's convenience stores are staffed entirely by immigrants from India has angered many members of the Indian-American community.
Slamming Biden for making "ridiculous comments" about the community, the president of the Indian American Republican Council (IARC) in Washington D.C. said in a statement: "Joe Biden has a history of making insensitive and inappropriate remarks . . ."


Dr. Raghavendra Vijayanagar, popularly known in the Indian-American community as "Dr. Vijay," said this isn't the first time a Senate Democrat has insulted Indian-Americans.


"In 2004, Sen. John Kerry referred to Sikhs as terrorists and Sen. Hillary Clinton jokingly referred to Mahatma Gandhi as a gas station owner," Dr. Vijay said. "A clear double-standard in the mainstream media will likely ensure Sen. Biden gets a pass over these comments that would get a Republican in deep trouble if he ever made a similar statement.”

Only Gannett News Service - owners of USA TODAY and Biden's home-state newspaper, the Delmarva Daily Times - reported on the Senator's thoughtless comment. USA TODAY did not carry the story.

http://www.newsmax.com/archives/ic/2006/7/7/115513.shtml
 

dmp

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But Biden is mostly correct. You know, I know it, and the American People know it.

lol :)
 
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red states rule

red states rule

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Let's not forget the only memeber of Congress who was a member of the KKK

The Democrat from WV

http://www.nationalcenter.org/P21PRByrd301.html
Where's the Outrage Over Robert Byrd?


Group Decries Racist Remark by Liberal Lawmaker, Asks Why Criticism is Muted


In the wake of the racist remark made by senior Democratic Senator Robert Byrd of West Virginia, members of the African-American leadership network Project 21 are concerned by the lack of spirited criticism by the civil rights establishment of the senator's statement in comparison to their treatment of conservatives and then-presidential candidate George W. Bush on matters of race.

Senator Byrd was interviewed by Fox News Sunday host Tony Snow in a segment that aired on March 4. While expanding on his comment that race relations are now "much, much better than they've been in my lifetime," Byrd made reference to whites who are still opposed to equal civil rights by saying, "There are white *******. I've seen a lot of white ******* in my time; I'm going to use that word." He later issued a statement apologizing for his remark.

While NAACP President Kweisi Mfume denounced Byrd's comments as "repulsive," the comments have not generated the same degree of criticism previously reserved for conservatives.

"I couldn't believe what I was reading," said Project 21 member S. Kevin Washington. "Senator Byrd's comments were first brought to my attention via voice mail from a personal friend. I had not heard it on a national news broadcast; not NPR; not outcries of disgust by well-known black faces around America. The same people who castigated Republicans - President Bush, in particular - as racist now give Byrd a pass for his using the word '******' just because he's a Democrat like them. What a bunch of nonsense."

House Majority Leader Dick Armey recently asked to meet with the NAACP's Mfume to discuss stopping a trend Armey calls "Racial McCarthyism or reverse race-baiting." Armey wrote: "t has become an all too common practice to spread unfounded, racially charged falsehoods against Republicans for political advantage. Deliberate or not, if left unchallenged, this practice will continue to divide our nation, polarize our political parties and do untold harm in the lives of real people who are unjustly accused of conspiracy against the civil rights of African-Americans."

Project 21 members are concerned that the NAACP, which spent millions against then-presidential candidate George W. Bush - focusing on false allegations that his decision not to sign a specific hate crimes bill (Texas already had one) led to the death of James Byrd - is doing little to criticize the intentionally offensive comments of liberal Senator Byrd. Such contrasts give the impression that the group is unfairly pulling its punches when dealing with racist behavior on the part of liberal politicians.

"I think the way Robert Byrd's racist comments were treated is typical of our current civil rights leadership," said Project 21 member Kevin Martin. "Groups like the NAACP have become nothing more than liberal mouthpieces. They seem beholden to liberal interests and, in this case, will simply issue a statement to make it look like they're doing something. They must hold the Democrats to the same standards they've held Republicans lest it become apparent that they've sold their souls - and credibility - to the liberal cause."
 

theHawk

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"But you see those are the people who have been overcharging us — selling us stale bread, and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans and now it's Arabs, very few black people own these stores."
How is this even a racist statement? All he is saying is that the stores have historically been owned by other ethnic groups, and seldomly by blacks. I don't know what the statistics are for "mom and pop" store ownership in predominately black areas, but it would be nice to see some stats that either refute or support the statement.
I don't think he should have to apologize for his comments, but I understand your point that if a white christian republican had said it, all hell would break loose.
 

ScreamingEagle

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How is this even a racist statement? All he is saying is that the stores have historically been owned by other ethnic groups, and seldomly by blacks. I don't know what the statistics are for "mom and pop" store ownership in predominately black areas, but it would be nice to see some stats that either refute or support the statement.
I don't think he should have to apologize for his comments, but I understand your point that if a white christian republican had said it, all hell would break loose.

I agree. The Left typically gets its panties in a twist over nothing. However, the Left does not care as long as the Left gets the results it wants: building power through destruction - which is why they are selective in their outrage.

We need to stop this "racial McCarthyism" by standing up to their stupid racial attacks and also by attacking them right back on all fronts. It's time for us white christian republicans to stop bowing to the mind-bending PC crap. How about we ferret out some commies and do some real McCarthyism of our own?:whip3:
 

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I know for sure that Biden's remarks were covered by CNN and NBC news .

And admit it, what Dunkin Donuts isn't owned by an Indian?

Who the heck is Don Young?
 
OP
red states rule

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I know for sure that Biden's remarks were covered by CNN and NBC news .

And admit it, what Dunkin Donuts isn't owned by an Indian?

Who the heck is Don Young?


They "covered" it by having an info babe bat her eyes at Mr Biden, and allow him to spin his comments.

After he was done spinning, the info babe looking adoringly at Biden and thanked him for clearing up the "misunderstanding"
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

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Yea, except that Biden wasn't on the program. Other than everything you said, you are correct.


Try again Mr. C

It was not an info babe in this example, just a liberal reporter helping his liberal bud

Of course this is how CNN "reports" the news - slanting the way they want. Which is to the left



http://newsbusters.org/node/6320
CNN Helps Sen. Biden Rationalize His Insensitive Indian Remarks
Posted by Noel Sheppard on July 8, 2006 - 13:03.
As reported by NewsBusters here, Sen. Joe Biden (D-Delaware) made some rather insensitive statements last month concerning not being able to “go to a 7- Eleven or Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent.” CNN invited Biden on Friday's 5PM ET installment of “The Situation Room” to discuss how things are going in Iraq – amongst other things – and then gave him a great opportunity to explain these Indian remarks (video link to follow).

Rather than challenge the Senator in any way, host John King filling in for Wolf Blitzer basically gave Biden a platform to rationalize why these statements weren’t inappropriate. After reading the offending sentences from Biden captured by C-SPAN, King simply asked, “What were you thinking?” Biden was then given the floor to make any statement that he wanted about this issue, without any grilling or interrogation whatsoever by King:

What I was thinking was, they took out of context the whole of what I said. I was making the point that up until now in my state, we've had a strong Indian community made up of leading scientists, and researchers, and engineers. I pointed out that over 30 percent of the engineers in Silicon Valley were Indians. And I said, but now it is even healthier. We are having middle class people move to Delaware, take over Dunkin Donuts, take over businesses just like other immigrant groups had. And I was saying that.

Nice job, Joe. What was King’s hard-hitting response? “So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?”

And that was it. No questions about how this might be deemed offensive to Indians in America. No demand of an apology. Just a simple, "So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?”

Maybe if CNN and the rest of the media would have reported that Sen. Trent Lott’s comments in December 2002 at a party celebrating the 100th birthday of Strom Thurmond were taken out of context, Lott would still be the Senate Majority Leader. Instead, at the time, CNN was so outraged by Lott’s statements that they had Al Gore on the December 9, 2002 edition of “Inside Politics” stating: “Trent Lott made a statement that I think is a racist statement, yes. That's why I think he should withdraw those comments or I think the United States Senate should undertake a censure of those comments.”

In fact, in December 2002, CNN did 166 reports about Lott's sentiments expressed to Thurmond according to an unaudited LexisNexis search. By contrast, only the 4PM and 5PM ET editions of “The Situation Room” have addressed the Biden comments since the story broke. And, although the 4PM installment cited a spokesperson from the Indian American Republican Council saying that Biden's comments were "over the top," that's about all the outrage CNN could muster concerning this issue. King didn't even ask Biden to comment about the opinions expressed by this Indian American group.

What a difference a “D” makes.

What follows is a full transcript of the 5PM ET segment, along with a video link courtesy of Crooks and Liars.



JOHN KING: Senator Biden, we need to close. But I want to ask you, Senator Biden, about something you said last month in New Hampshire that is just exploding on the blogs right now. And I want to give you a chance to answer it. You said this while you were up in New Hampshire, captured by CSPAN on June 17th: "You cannot go to a 7- Eleven or Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent, I'm not joking."

What were you thinking?

BIDEN: What I was thinking was, they took out of context the whole of what I said. I was making the point that up until now in my state, we've had a strong Indian community made up of leading scientists, and researchers, and engineers. I pointed out that over 30 percent of the engineers in Silicon Valley were Indians.

And I said, but now it is even healthier. We are having middle class people move to Delaware, take over Dunkin Donuts, take over businesses just like other immigrant groups had. And I was saying that.

And my comment about you can't go in unless you have an Indian accent was making the point that they're growing, it's moving. I could have said that 40 years ago about walking into delicatessen and saying an Italian accent in my state.

The point was, this is healthy. We're now having not merely engineers and scientists and the significant brain power that came our way in the Indian community, but we're also now having ordinary middle class people move to this country, building businesses, building families and strengthening our neighborhoods.

That was the generic point I was making. I've made it a number of times in the Indian community and out of the Indian community. This is a vibrant, vibrant community that ranges all of the way from CEOs in Silicon Valley to families that are taking over the Dunkin Donuts and fast-food stores in my state and building businesses and building the community.

KING: So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?

BIDEN: Absolutely, positively. I have had an incredibly strong relationship with the Indian-American community in the State of Delaware, which has been vibrant. They are mostly engineers in the DuPont company, scientists and the drug companies.

And the point I'm making now is now you have not just the scientists and the cream of the crop, you have average middle class Indians moving to the United States and making contributions, at least in my state, which I'm very familiar with.
 

RyzinEnagy

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Try again Mr. C

It was not an info babe in this example, just a liberal reporter helping his liberal bud

Of course this is how CNN "reports" the news - slanting the way they want. Which is to the left



http://newsbusters.org/node/6320
CNN Helps Sen. Biden Rationalize His Insensitive Indian Remarks
Posted by Noel Sheppard on July 8, 2006 - 13:03.
As reported by NewsBusters here, Sen. Joe Biden (D-Delaware) made some rather insensitive statements last month concerning not being able to “go to a 7- Eleven or Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent.” CNN invited Biden on Friday's 5PM ET installment of “The Situation Room” to discuss how things are going in Iraq – amongst other things – and then gave him a great opportunity to explain these Indian remarks (video link to follow).

Rather than challenge the Senator in any way, host John King filling in for Wolf Blitzer basically gave Biden a platform to rationalize why these statements weren’t inappropriate. After reading the offending sentences from Biden captured by C-SPAN, King simply asked, “What were you thinking?” Biden was then given the floor to make any statement that he wanted about this issue, without any grilling or interrogation whatsoever by King:

What I was thinking was, they took out of context the whole of what I said. I was making the point that up until now in my state, we've had a strong Indian community made up of leading scientists, and researchers, and engineers. I pointed out that over 30 percent of the engineers in Silicon Valley were Indians. And I said, but now it is even healthier. We are having middle class people move to Delaware, take over Dunkin Donuts, take over businesses just like other immigrant groups had. And I was saying that.

Nice job, Joe. What was King’s hard-hitting response? “So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?”

And that was it. No questions about how this might be deemed offensive to Indians in America. No demand of an apology. Just a simple, "So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?”

Maybe if CNN and the rest of the media would have reported that Sen. Trent Lott’s comments in December 2002 at a party celebrating the 100th birthday of Strom Thurmond were taken out of context, Lott would still be the Senate Majority Leader. Instead, at the time, CNN was so outraged by Lott’s statements that they had Al Gore on the December 9, 2002 edition of “Inside Politics” stating: “Trent Lott made a statement that I think is a racist statement, yes. That's why I think he should withdraw those comments or I think the United States Senate should undertake a censure of those comments.”

In fact, in December 2002, CNN did 166 reports about Lott's sentiments expressed to Thurmond according to an unaudited LexisNexis search. By contrast, only the 4PM and 5PM ET editions of “The Situation Room” have addressed the Biden comments since the story broke. And, although the 4PM installment cited a spokesperson from the Indian American Republican Council saying that Biden's comments were "over the top," that's about all the outrage CNN could muster concerning this issue. King didn't even ask Biden to comment about the opinions expressed by this Indian American group.

What a difference a “D” makes.

What follows is a full transcript of the 5PM ET segment, along with a video link courtesy of Crooks and Liars.



JOHN KING: Senator Biden, we need to close. But I want to ask you, Senator Biden, about something you said last month in New Hampshire that is just exploding on the blogs right now. And I want to give you a chance to answer it. You said this while you were up in New Hampshire, captured by CSPAN on June 17th: "You cannot go to a 7- Eleven or Dunkin Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent, I'm not joking."

What were you thinking?

BIDEN: What I was thinking was, they took out of context the whole of what I said. I was making the point that up until now in my state, we've had a strong Indian community made up of leading scientists, and researchers, and engineers. I pointed out that over 30 percent of the engineers in Silicon Valley were Indians.

And I said, but now it is even healthier. We are having middle class people move to Delaware, take over Dunkin Donuts, take over businesses just like other immigrant groups had. And I was saying that.

And my comment about you can't go in unless you have an Indian accent was making the point that they're growing, it's moving. I could have said that 40 years ago about walking into delicatessen and saying an Italian accent in my state.

The point was, this is healthy. We're now having not merely engineers and scientists and the significant brain power that came our way in the Indian community, but we're also now having ordinary middle class people move to this country, building businesses, building families and strengthening our neighborhoods.

That was the generic point I was making. I've made it a number of times in the Indian community and out of the Indian community. This is a vibrant, vibrant community that ranges all of the way from CEOs in Silicon Valley to families that are taking over the Dunkin Donuts and fast-food stores in my state and building businesses and building the community.

KING: So anyone who casts that as an insensitive remark is taking you out of context?

BIDEN: Absolutely, positively. I have had an incredibly strong relationship with the Indian-American community in the State of Delaware, which has been vibrant. They are mostly engineers in the DuPont company, scientists and the drug companies.

And the point I'm making now is now you have not just the scientists and the cream of the crop, you have average middle class Indians moving to the United States and making contributions, at least in my state, which I'm very familiar with.

:bs1:

When you say that you can't work at a 7-11 or Dunkin Donuts without an Indian accent, you are making fun of the fact that they actually have accents. No way that was taken out of context.

I was one of the last people who didn't believe the MSM was actually liberal (anyone who still does is clearly an idiot).
 
OP
red states rule

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Compare the coverage to the Binden, Young, and Hillary comments to Sen George Allen is getting right now, and you will see the MSM is in the tank for the Democrat party

http://newsbusters.org/node/6991
Washington Post Pounds George Allen with Supposedly Racist Gaffe
Posted by Tim Graham on August 15, 2006 - 13:17.
In early July, Sen. Joe Biden joked before a C-SPAN camera that “you cannot go into a Dunkin Donuts of a 7-Eleven unless you have a slight Indian accent.” Conservatives had a little fun with it, but said: a harmless slip, but if a Republican ever did it, the media would have a much different standard. That day is now. Sen. George Allen mocked an Indian-American Democratic volunteer as a "macaca," and the Post played it up on the front page, along with a very tendentious staff editorial to boot insisting Allen's racial "bullying" was beyond "the bounds of decency." Washington Post coverage of Biden? None. Not in the paper.

The Post displayed aggressive Democratic media bias in action, a glaringly obvious Jim Webb for U.S. Senate ad, heavy on outraged quotes from Webb campaign staffers. The headline for the story by Tim Craig and Michael Shear was "Allen Quip Provokes Outrage, Apology: Name Insults Webb Volunteer."

Virginia Sen. George Allen (R) apologized Monday for what his opponent's campaign said were demeaning and insensitive comments the senator made to a 20-year-old volunteer of Indian descent.

At a campaign rally in southwest Virginia on Friday, Allen repeatedly called a volunteer for Democrat James Webb "macaca." During the speech in Breaks, near the Kentucky border, Allen began by saying that he was "going to run this campaign on positive, constructive ideas" and then pointed at S.R. Sidarth in the crowd.

"This fellow here, over here with the yellow shirt, macaca, or whatever his name is. He's with my opponent. He's following us around everywhere. And it's just great," Allen said, as his supporters began to laugh. After saying that Webb was raising money in California with a "bunch of Hollywood movie moguls," Allen said, "Let's give a welcome to macaca, here. Welcome to America and the real world of Virginia." Allen then began talking about the "war on terror."

Depending on how it is spelled, the word macaca could mean either a monkey that inhabits the Eastern Hemisphere or a town in South Africa. In some European cultures, macaca is also considered a racial slur against African immigrants, according to several Web sites that track ethnic slurs.'

"The kid has a name," Webb communications director Kristian Denny Todd said of Sidarth, a Virginia native who was born in Fairfax County. "This is trying to demean him, to minimize him as a person."

Todd added that the use of macaca, whatever it means, and the reference welcoming Sidarth to America were clearly intended to make him uncomfortable.

It's a bit odd for the Webb spokesman to say Allen minimized Sidarth in the same breath that he's calling this 20-year-old "the kid." If Allen had called him "the kid," that probably would have been the Webb campaign's gaffe of the day.

Some might say that Allen is a Senator from Virginia, so it's a local story, unlike Biden's. True, but both also are mentioned as presidential contenders. The Post is just much more willing to consider that Allen is a bigot.

Then consider this contrast, then. Biden in July, there was nothing. But also in Tuesday's paper was a story on Congressman John Kline of Minnesota apologizing for the media taking his Haditha remarks out of context, page A-3. (Oh, and just for fun, liberal Democrat Congressman John Murtha refusing to apologize for pre-judging the Haditha Marines? Post put that further back in the paper, A-10.) Unlike Biden, John Kline is a House newbie, a backbencher, and certainly not a national candidate or a local story.

The Post uses Robert Holsworth to try and hype the potential damage this gaffe could do to an Allen presidential bid: “Virginia Commonwealth University politics professor Robert Holsworth called Allen’s comments a gaffe that probably wouldn’t change the Senate race but could hurt his presidential ambitions.” Holsworth never offered an opinion on Biden’s national ambitions and Indian gaffes. The Post never noticed.

Over at The Corner, Kate O'Beirne added that Allen has plenty of room here to suggest that Allen could insist that Webb and his Post pals think those Virginia hicks are racists:

The front page headline "Allen Quip Provokes Outrage. . . " and the editorial ("George Allen's America" no less) represent a pro-Webb two-punch. Who exactly was outraged by Allen's putdown? The Webb campaign and its volunteer. The silly editorial irrelevantly points out that the offended Webb partisan has "an excellent academic record" and "is thinking of applying to law school." Although the bright young man wasn't smart enough to avoid insulting Virginia voters. He told the Post, "I was the person of color there and it was useful for him in inciting his audience." He apparently believes that drawing attention to him would reliably rile up the racist Virginia crackers. Whose quip should provoke outrage?

Six years ago, the Post virtually campaigned for Chuck Robb, with color photos of Robb and his wife and family splashed on the front page. They’re obviously doing it all over again in this cycle.

Related: Dan Riehl notes that the Post is distorting Allen.
 

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How is this even a racist statement? All he is saying is that the stores have historically been owned by other ethnic groups, and seldomly by blacks. I don't know what the statistics are for "mom and pop" store ownership in predominately black areas, but it would be nice to see some stats that either refute or support the statement.
I don't think he should have to apologize for his comments, but I understand your point that if a white christian republican had said it, all hell would break loose.
I don't think he should apologize. I don't think anyone should be forced to apologize for offending the PC. That usually amounts to telling the truth without the whitewash.

At the same time, bringing ethnicity into the argument as a factor IS racist.
 

BaronVonBigmeat

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"But you see those are the people who have been overcharging us — selling us stale bread, and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans and now it's Arabs, very few black people own these stores."
If they sell inferior products at inflated products...take your business elsewhere!

Also while you're at it, maybe you could explain why immigrants are running businesses while 10th generation americans are collecting welfare and bitching about the corner store not having Wal-Mart prices and quality.
 

Mr.Conley

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Figures, I need to watch more CNN. They did cover it pretty extensively though. I don't think they were "insensitive remarks" but who am I to judge. I wouldn't consider Larry King a "info babe" though (unless your into that sort of thing that is).
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

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The Washington Compost is still going after Sen Allen. They do have a double standard when it comes the libs and conservatives


The 'Real World' of Sen. Allen

By Eugene Robinson
Friday, August 18, 2006; Page A21

You know a politician is having a bad week when he spends it trying to convince people he's too unsophisticated to have possibly understood the racial slur he tossed at a man who happened to be armed with a video camera.

Sen. George Allen's mental journey to the imaginary land of Macaca has brought the one-term Virginia Republican -- considered a presidential hopeful for 2008 -- more national attention than ever before. But not in a good way

The Macaca incident became a sensation on the video-sharing Web site YouTube.com, where some visitors helpfully posted clips of macaques, which are monkeys. It spawned a host of predictable jokes -- "Funny, you don't look Macacan" -- and inspired a hilarious bit on "The Daily Show" that ended with a potty-humor punch line not entirely suitable for the opinion pages of a distinguished newspaper. Suffice it to say that another make-believe realm called Yapipi was invoked.

As you probably know by now, Allen was making a campaign stop and spotted a college student who was shadowing him -- videotaping all his appearances -- to gather possible ammunition for the campaign of his opponent, Democrat James Webb. The young man, S.R. Sidarth, is of Indian descent. Allen pointed him out for the all-white crowd, calling him "Macaca, or whatever his name is," and then said to Sidarth, "Welcome to America and the real world of Virginia." Sidarth happens to be a Virginia native.

Allen and his aides scrambled to assure reporters that the senator had no idea that macaca is the genus to which macaques belong. Nor did the senator have a clue that in some European countries " makak " is a derogatory term for North African immigrants.

Okay, I'm willing to believe the senator is ignorant of primate taxonomy and Belgian slang -- he's all about good-ol'-boy bonhomie, not Renaissance-man erudition. I don't buy the rest of his explanation, though -- that he was trying to refer to Sidarth's haircut, which he thought was a mohawk. I also don't buy his claim that he meant no offense.

I think he was playing to the crowd by singling out the one person who didn't belong there, not because he was a spy from a rival campaign -- shadowing is standard campaign practice these days -- but because he looked "foreign" (my word, not his). I think he came up with "Macaca" as a kind of generic name for a foreigner who appeared to be from the Indian subcontinent, or someplace over there where people have dark skin and straight black hair. Why else would he add the "welcome to America" bit if not to emphasize Sidarth's apparent foreignness?

Let's assume for the moment that the Macaca moment was not premeditated, that it was an ad lib. That means Allen instinctively or subconsciously believed that drawing a line between his white audience and the darker, foreign-looking Sidarth was at that moment good politics. It was a way of defining "us" and "them," and the thing is that it worked, drawing a hearty laugh from the crowd.

If the senator doesn't realize that Americans come in an increasing range of shapes, sizes and colors, then his ignorance extends far beyond Old World monkeys and obscure slurs. Surely he has seen the new census figures that show how immigrants are settling in parts of the country that traditionally have had little or no foreign-born population. Maybe that was the point.

If we are to accept the testimony of friends who insist that Allen himself is no racist -- I've met him, but only briefly, so all I can report is that he seems genial enough -- then maybe the Macaca thing didn't grow out of ignorance at all but out of a sense that there is political advantage to be had from playing on fears and apprehensions about immigration. Maybe he was giving that audience in conservative southwestern Virginia a clear message: I'm with you, I'm one of you, and we all understand that the guy over there with the camera is not one of us, he's just a Macaca whose real name probably has a lot of awkward syllables and isn't worth learning to pronounce.

Because of his swagger and personality, Allen is often likened to George W. Bush. The president, for all his manifold faults, is one of the few politicians who really does understand the changing face of America. I'm beginning to think that perhaps Allen understands it, too -- at least well enough to know what buttons to push among white audiences.

Senator, I don't think you're as ignorant as you claim.
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

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Figures, I need to watch more CNN. They did cover it pretty extensively though. I don't think they were "insensitive remarks" but who am I to judge. I wouldn't consider Larry King a "info babe" though (unless your into that sort of thing that is).


Even a black liberal can be attacked for not sticking to the DNC talking points........


http://newsbusters.org/node/7099


Post Reviewer: Not 'Enough' White Racism In Williams' Book
Posted by Lyford Beverage on August 21, 2006 - 13:52.
Juan Williams is a long-time columnist and commentator, who has been at the Washington Post (where he has an excellent column today) for years, as well as NPR and FoxNews. He has also written several books, the latest of which was reviewed in The Washington Post yesterday, by one Peniel E. Joseph.

Anyone who's followed the Washington media for any length of time over the past 20 years knows who Juan Williams is. And he knows that Williams is not a conservative. But the Washington Post, which has employed him and run hundreds of his columns, went out and found someone to savage his latest book. From the left.

Mr. Joseph, who is a teacher of "Africana Studies" at Stony Brook University, is apparently not interested in any discussion of black issues in America that aren't focused on white racism. The idea that blacks in America need to take any responsibility for their condition is apparently "simplistic."

In Cosby's speeches and Williams's book, fleeting acknowledgments of racism are trumped by simplistic, at times repetitive lectures cautioning blacks to look at their own shortcomings before blaming anyone else.
Beyond Williams's polemics lies a more complex story about the political economy of racism whose effects on poor neighborhoods elude those who romanticize ghetto and "gangsta" culture. His discussions of the "stop snitching" campaigns that discourage cooperation with police and Cosby's outrage over the epidemic use of the "N" word are worthy of serious debate. But that would require the kind of rich analysis, penetrating insight and layered narrative that Enough lacks, as well as a hard look at the impacts of unemployment, racial profiling, police brutality and other features of modern-day racism, along with the lingering effects of slavery and Jim Crow, which continue to disfigure the lives of blacks and distort the shape of American democracy.

He obviously has a right to his opinion, but can we concede that it's not a particularly "mainstream" or "centrist" position? The killer, though, is this gem:
Enough concludes with a flurry of righteous condescension, preaching that youngsters can best avoid poverty by finishing high school, getting a job and postponing marriage and child-bearing until at least 21.
In my world, no one would ever call it "condescending" to suggest that finishing school, getting a job and waiting until 21 to get married and have children was the path to success. Apparently, that is inappropriately judgmental advice in certain circles. Circles that the Washington Post is willing to go to for book reviews...
 

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