When Voting, Think Local

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
 

Dogbiscuit

Diamond Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
1,597
Reaction score
2,041
Points
1,903
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
Agreed.
In this fast paced world, it can be difficult to find time to stay engaged.
Some dont want to get involved until its too late.
Im guilty of this myself.
 
Last edited:
OP
Flopper

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
Agreed.
In this face paced world, it can be difficult to find time to stay engaged.
Some dont want to get involved until its too late.
Im guilty of this myself.
I can hardly believe how little attention voters pay to local issues and yet become totally consumed by who occupies the white house. In local elections, turnout usually runs 15% to 20%. I saw a survey done on local elections. Of the 1 in 5 people that vote, less half read the voter pamphlets that explain propositions and amendments. That mean only about 10% of the voters are deciding major issue.

Most of the things a president does of any significance is dependent on congress and the courts which always makes a president's agenda iffy Even if a president does act independently, for one reason or another his actions has little effect on most people.

s.
 

Prof.Lunaphiles

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2020
Messages
1,032
Reaction score
604
Points
908
Location
Transient
Exactly, most people do not pay attention to the state and local for several reasons. It gets difficult, because there are more offices and options and less deliberation of those offices and options. And your local politicians take advantage of the lack of attention.
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
26,473
Reaction score
10,193
Points
910
Location
Tejas
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
I absolutely agree.

So, why do some want to give so much power to a central government, when local WAY better suited for individual situations?

We need to cut the FedGov by 80%!!!
 

Ray From Cleveland

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
64,930
Reaction score
14,311
Points
2,290
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
Years ago I was talking with somebody that worked for one of our customers and we began a discussion about an upcoming election. He admitted he knew very little about the issues or politics in general, but votes out of patriotic duty. I told him if he didn't know the issues or much about politics, the most patriotic thing he could do is not vote.

The problem is we have way too many voters that have no idea what they're even voting on. If they did, Biden would not even show in the polls.
 

Shawnee_b

Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
4,450
Reaction score
2,482
Points
910
Location
South Central KY
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
I always do, I did and will continue to do so. From the Pres down to the local county surveyor, it all matters.
 

basquebromance

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
61,514
Reaction score
9,039
Points
2,070
we've got to do something about those pesky neighborhood dogs knocking over trash cans

whoever has a plan for that, has my vote!
 

basquebromance

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
61,514
Reaction score
9,039
Points
2,070
also, snowmobiles should be prohibited on the walkway
 

The Original Tree

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
30,045
Reaction score
8,273
Points
1,340
Location
OHIO
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
No one local wants Globalism, Nationwide Lock downs, and Nations Nazi Mask Mandates, No Gasoline for their cars, and Illegal Aliens that we will get taxed out the wazoo to support.
 

basquebromance

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
61,514
Reaction score
9,039
Points
2,070
On November 3rd, 415 local down-ballot elections will be voted on
 
OP
Flopper

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
Exactly, most people do not pay attention to the state and local for several reasons. It gets difficult, because there are more offices and options and less deliberation of those offices and options. And your local politicians take advantage of the lack of attention.
Yes, I've seen how politician utilize local elections to get what they want. A Tax bill, bond issue, or other rather unpopular item that would have never passed in a federal election with a large turn out sales through in a local election with few candidates or other issues on the ballot. Often special interest groups such as teachers, city or county workers, or unions, who would benefit from the passage show up in large numbers.
 
OP
Flopper

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
Years ago I was talking with somebody that worked for one of our customers and we began a discussion about an upcoming election. He admitted he knew very little about the issues or politics in general, but votes out of patriotic duty. I told him if he didn't know the issues or much about politics, the most patriotic thing he could do is not vote.

The problem is we have way too many voters that have no idea what they're even voting on. If they did, Biden would not even show in the polls.
In two states I have lived in , I've seen a lot extremely complex issues put on the ballot. Just understanding them can take hours. We elect legislatures to make laws, not pass them down to voters.
 

Dana7360

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2014
Messages
10,488
Reaction score
6,266
Points
1,055
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.


I go through the voter's pamphlet when I comes. I read through all the initiatives and politicians. I call people who are running. They give a phone number right there in the voter's pamphlet. I use the number, call and talk to the person running.

I agree that local politics is very important. People need to find out who is running and learn about the issues on the ballot then vote.

By the time my ballot comes in the mail, I've gone through the voter's pamphlet, marked who to vote for , what issues to vote for or against. It doesn't take me long to mark the whole ballot.
 

Ray From Cleveland

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
64,930
Reaction score
14,311
Points
2,290
In two states I have lived in , I've seen a lot extremely complex issues put on the ballot. Just understanding them can take hours. We elect legislatures to make laws, not pass them down to voters.
Agreed, but we have to come to the reality that most are not going to do what you, I, and most members here do. They will base their vote by name, by race, by ethnic background, by gender.
 

bripat9643

Diamond Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2011
Messages
130,257
Reaction score
23,358
Points
2,180
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
So do you believe WW II and the cold war didn't affect people's daily lives?
 
OP
Flopper

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
In two states I have lived in , I've seen a lot extremely complex issues put on the ballot. Just understanding them can take hours. We elect legislatures to make laws, not pass them down to voters.
Agreed, but we have to come to the reality that most are not going to do what you, I, and most members here do. They will base their vote by name, by race, by ethnic background, by gender.
Unfortunately, that is true. It is one of the drawbacks of democratic elections. It's said, citizens have a responsibility to vote. That responsibility should be to vote intelligently which means investigating who and what you're on. In many underdeveloped were illiteracy is high, there is little done to conduct fair elections where voters are informed on the qualifications of candidates and the truth about issues on the ballot.
 
OP
Flopper

Flopper

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2010
Messages
25,079
Reaction score
5,339
Points
280
Location
Washington
I was talking to my neighbor this morning about the election. He said, he just finished his mail-in ballot and it only took a few minutes. It took me at least a couple of hours to go through all the propositions, amendments, local and state candidates for office. Of course what my neighbor did was to just vote for the president and skipped the rest. Yet the rest, local and state issues and candidates have the greatest impact on our daily lives. The president didn't close or open the schools and business in my town, increase my property taxes by 20%, close my favorite camping place, get the potholes fixed on my street, or open a new dog park two blocks from my house. Yet people act as if the only important issue to be decided next week is which party controls the presidency and the congress.

Most of the things that impact your daily life happen on a local level and are influenced by local politics, but because we are bombarded by national stories every moment of every day, we find ourselves thinking nationally, not locally. It’s time for that to change.
I absolutely agree.

So, why do some want to give so much power to a central government, when local WAY better suited for individual situations?

We need to cut the FedGov by 80%!!!
There are many reasons all them tied to a nation and a world that is figuratively shrinking due to travel and communications. Where once 90% of the people spent most of their lives, lived and died in the state they were born in, less half do today. The public and businesses expect commonality across the nation and that can only happen with a large federal government. States have emergencies and need a federal government large enough to be called upon regardless of the size of the emergency again requiring a strong federal government. We often think of how much more efficient it would be if it was all done locally but is that really true. Would it really be more efficient to have 50 Medicares, Social Securities, FDAs, CDCs, postal systems, militaries, etc. I think not.

Basically what we want is what the federal government provides but we also want local control of it and that is just not possible.
 
Last edited:

Ray From Cleveland

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
64,930
Reaction score
14,311
Points
2,290
There are many reasons all them tied to a nation and a world that is figuratively shrinking due to travel and communications. Where once 90% of the people spent most of their lives, lived and died in the state they were born in, less half do today. The public and businesses expect commonality across the nation and that can only happen with a large federal government. States have emergencies and need a government that they be call upon regardless of the size of the emergency again requiring a strong federal government. We often think of how much more efficient it would be if it was all done locally but is that really true. Would it really be more efficient to have 50 Medicares, Social Securities, FDAs, CDCs, postal systems, militaries, etc. I think not.
The more dependent you are on your federal government, the more power you give them.
 

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top