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Ways of preserving your harvest

JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
 

progressive hunter

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens
 

Vastator

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
Take the weight of the jars contents, water included, and weigh it. Multiply that number by .025. That number tells you how much salt to add by weight. Add that much non iodized salt, completely submerge contents, and store loosely covered so it can vent, in a cool (60-70 degreeF) area. Give it a week, or more depending on your personal taste.
 
Last edited:

progressive hunter

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
That's fair enough...…..but I still question what you call risk?
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
I am not telling you what to do

I’m telling you what I do
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
Take the weight of the jars contents, water included, and weigh it. Multiply that number by .025. That number tells you how much salt to add by weight. Add that much salt, completely submerge contents, and store loosely covered so it can vent, in a cool (60-70 degreeF) area. Give it a week, or more depending on your personal taste.
Do you mean to 'ferment' the foods? Atleast that's what it sounds like, yes? no?
 

Vastator

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
Take the weight of the jars contents, water included, and weigh it. Multiply that number by .025. That number tells you how much salt to add by weight. Add that much salt, completely submerge contents, and store loosely covered so it can vent, in a cool (60-70 degreeF) area. Give it a week, or more depending on your personal taste.
Do you mean to 'ferment' the foods? Atleast that's what it sounds like, yes? no?
Yes. For fermenting. Isn’t that what we’re talking about?
 

progressive hunter

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
I am not telling you what to do

I’m telling you what I do
but you said there were risks involved and I should not consume it,, that implies your warning me not to consume things over a yr old,,,I just showed that its subjective,,,
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
I am not telling you what to do

I’m telling you what I do

OK...…...but that just seems like a lot of wasted food, time, effort & expense to give perfectly good food to the chickens...…..but as you say, carry on
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
That's fair enough...…..but I still question what you call risk?
The safest long-term storage is freeze dryed packed in vacuum bags

its good for up to 25 years

but the only home freeze dryer on the market is expensive and unreliable

so I can in mason jars

but thats just me
 
OP
JustAnotherNut

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
Take the weight of the jars contents, water included, and weigh it. Multiply that number by .025. That number tells you how much salt to add by weight. Add that much salt, completely submerge contents, and store loosely covered so it can vent, in a cool (60-70 degreeF) area. Give it a week, or more depending on your personal taste.
Do you mean to 'ferment' the foods? Atleast that's what it sounds like, yes? no?
Yes. For fermenting. Isn’t that what we’re talking about?

Well...part of it yes. And thanks for the calculator to determine needs of salt.
 

Mac-7

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
I am not telling you what to do

I’m telling you what I do

OK...…...but that just seems like a lot of wasted food, time, effort & expense to give perfectly good food to the chickens...…..but as you say, carry on
Unless next years crop fails feeding it to the chickens is not wasting it
 

progressive hunter

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Whether your grow your own or find a great sale, you may find yourself with an abundance that you can't eat it all before it goes bad. Of course the freezer is always the easiest option for many things, there are still some that don't freeze well. Canning is another option, but if you've never done it before it can be a rather expensive investment with the equipment, canner(s), jars, lids, etc, plus there's that learning curve of how to do it properly to ensure the food is safe to eat.

Then there's the dehydrator, that can also cost a bit and depending on models & where you buy one can run from $50 on up to hundreds of dollars. IF you have a convection oven, it is possible to dry atleast some foods in there with the fan going and the door open. It's also possible to use the sun, though you'd need atleast one mesh screen and something over the top to keep the bugs out that would allow plenty of air flow all around the food. Either another mesh screen or even a couple layers of cheesecloth. Just have to make sure it isn't too hot in the sun or the food may be cooked.

Other options are fermenting. You would need to look into the process for the particular food you want to ferment, but as an example.....I have some garlic that was packed into a glass quart jar and filled with water and about 2 tablespoons of salt and left on my counter. It's been there for about a month and when I need fresh garlic I take out what I need.
Here is a link to the same process I used... Fermented Garlic • Delicious Powerhouse of Nutrition
There is also the Harvest Right home freeze dryer

but it begins at $2200 and gets mixed reviews from users

all the methods you mentioned are suitable for saving a garden harvest to the next harvest but no longer
Thank you for including the freeze dryer as another possibility.

But I disagree that the preservation methods I listed are only good for a year. Although freezing is usually only good up to a few months, depending on what it is and I'm not really sure about fermenting.

But as for canning and dehydrating, if properly sealed, processed and stored can last several years before degradation begins....but this isn't about a 30year shelf life and is assuming you'd have a fresh supply with the next growing season
you can stretch canning beyond a season, though at some risk

but the idea for me is to preserve this years excess harvest till the next years crop is ready to pick
I'm not sure what you mean by risk?

Anything I find on length of home canned foods, has more to do with quality & nutritional loss over extended time rather than safety issues. Again, as long as it's properly sealed and stored in a cool dark place. Light & heat can effect not only the nutrition value and quality of the food, but also the seal. It is recommended to eat it within a year, but that has more to do with the quality & nutrition, rather than safety.

How long does home-preserved food last?

If foods are preserved correctly, they are safe for years but the quality and nutritional value decreases with the passing of time. The National Center for Home Food Preservation recommends only preserving enough food to last one year. So that your home-canned foods taste great and are nutritious when you decide to eat them.

But I do similar to what you say, of having enough until the next years crop harvest. Though most years, I have some things leftover for another season. It's hard to determine exact amounts needed, cause we don't always use it as planned. Some things I run out of long before and others we didn't use enough. Those jars that are carried over from last year or even the year before are still safe to eat, but are pulled to the front and any new are stored behind in rotation so the older stuff is used first.

One thing is for sure, if I have jars of perfectly sealed, good looking, smelling foods when opened...even if 3 or 4 years old, I will not toss it in the garbage just because they weren't of the current season.
Thats ok for you

but I just preserve for one season to the next
do you throw away what you dont eat???
No

I feed it to the chickens

they dug up a 150 yr old steamboat north of KC and opened one of the canned peaches and said it was perfectly fine to eat,,,
I am not telling you what to do

I’m telling you what I do

OK...…...but that just seems like a lot of wasted food, time, effort & expense to give perfectly good food to the chickens...…..but as you say, carry on
I dont believe him,,,
I have found chickens dont like canned items,,,might be due to the salt or other contents,,,
 

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