Trumpers tired of winning yet? Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

Denizen

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Another Donald Trump gut decision goes haywire as coal mines go bankrupt and the existence of communities is threatened.

Perhaps Donald Trump should visit and throw some rolls of toilet paper to these victims of his gut-wrenching policies. "At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit."

Donald Trump's rollback of EPA regulations was not enough to save the coal industry.

The economy of the US is creaking as Donald Trump's gut decisions prove wrong consistently and painfully.

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

MEAD GRUVER, Associated Press•September 14, 2019

The shutdown of Blackjewel LLC's Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte mines in Wyoming since July 1, 2019 has added yet more uncertainty to the Powder River Basin's struggling coal economy.

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit.

Warehouse technician Melissa Worden divvied up what remained, giving four rolls to each mine and two to the mine supply facility where she worked.

Then mine owner Blackjewel LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on July 1. Worden figured the accounts would get settled quickly.
"The consensus was: In 30 days, we'll look back on this, and we made it through, and we'll be up and running, and it's a fresh start," Worden said.

What happened instead has shaken the top coal-producing region in the United States. Blackjewel furloughed most of its Wyoming employees and shut down Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines, the first idled by hardship since coal mining in the Powder River Basin exploded in the 1970s.

It's a big hit to the region straddling northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana, where coal has quietly supported the economies of both states for decades and fuels a shrinking number of power plants in 28 states.
Negotiations that could reopen the two Wyoming mines under new ownership are stalled more than two months later. Some 600 employees remain off the job. And doubts are growing about the long-term viability of the region's coal mines.

"I don't think we'll ever be that naive again," said Worden, 44.
Blackjewel, based in Milton, West Virginia, told its Wyoming employees this week that the mines might be running again soon and to let the company know if they wanted their jobs back.
Worden said she felt little reassurance. She's not the only one questioning long-held assumptions about Powder River Basin mines, which produce cleaner-burning coal less expensively than mines in other parts of the U.S. and weren't widely thought of being at risk.

But with coal in long-term decline, how the basin might eventually scale down production to a sustainable level has become a big question, said Rob Godby, director of the Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy at the University of Wyoming.

"The irony here — and it's really a cruel irony — is everybody is focused on getting these miners back to work. But really the solution to creating a healthy industry is some mines close," Godby said.

For now, little appears changed in Gillette, a city of 30,000 at the heart of the basin of rolling grasslands where tattoo shops are abundant and big, late-model pickup trucks still cruise the main drag.
This year, however, has been especially tumultuous. Three of the Powder River Basin's nine producers — Westmoreland Coal, Cloud Peak Energy and Blackjewel — have filed for bankruptcy since March. Two others, Arch Coal and Peabody, say they will merge assets in the region.

The turmoil comes as U.S. coal production is down over 30 percent since peaking in 2008. Utilities are retiring aging coal-fired power plants and switching to solar, wind and cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas to generate electricity despite President Donald Trump's efforts to prop up the coal industry.
A decade ago, about half of U.S. electricity came from coal-fired power. Now it's below 30 percent, a shift that heavy equipment operator Rory Wallet saw as utilities became less willing to lock in multiyear contracts for Belle Ayr mine's coal.

"The market's changed," Wallet said. "The bankruptcies all tie into that."
Wallet, 40, who followed his father into the mine in 2008, said the recent closures and loss of his $80,000-a-year job surprised him. He has four children, and his wife's job at a restaurant in Gillette is their main income while they await news about the mines.

Blackjewel said Thursday that it was working on plans to restart the mines while pursuing their sale. There were no indications in federal bankruptcy court filings that the mines were set to reopen, however.
"This is a fast-moving and sometimes unpredictable process, and accordingly, we do not have answers to all of your questions at this time," the company's statement said.

Wallet is looking for a job and lobbying Wyoming lawmakers to fight harder to force Washington state to approve a port facility expansion that would allow more coal exports to Asia.
"The ports are going to be a big deal. Asia is going to be a big deal," Wallet said.
But Godby said the amount of coal that the proposed export terminal could handle would offset only a small fraction of the amount that production has declined.

Powder River Basin mines employ about 5,000 miners — 20 percent fewer than eight years ago. The impact is even wider because an additional 8,000 jobs, from teachers to car mechanics, have indirect ties to the coal industry.

Locals cheered when Trump lifted a federal moratorium on coal leases, but Worden and Wallet disagree about whether changing environmental regulations will do much good.
Both say coal should continue to have a place alongside renewable energy.
"It needs to be a group effort, not green is on one side and black is on the other," Worden said. "We don't want this community to die." ...
 

Andylusion

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Another Donald Trump gut decision goes haywire as coal mines go bankrupt and the existence of communities is threatened.

Perhaps Donald Trump should visit and throw some rolls of toilet paper to these victims of his gut-wrenching policies. "At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit."

Donald Trump's rollback of EPA regulations was not enough to save the coal industry.

The economy of the US is creaking as Donald Trump's gut decisions prove wrong consistently and painfully.

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

MEAD GRUVER, Associated Press•September 14, 2019

The shutdown of Blackjewel LLC's Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte mines in Wyoming since July 1, 2019 has added yet more uncertainty to the Powder River Basin's struggling coal economy.

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit.

Warehouse technician Melissa Worden divvied up what remained, giving four rolls to each mine and two to the mine supply facility where she worked.

Then mine owner Blackjewel LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on July 1. Worden figured the accounts would get settled quickly.
"The consensus was: In 30 days, we'll look back on this, and we made it through, and we'll be up and running, and it's a fresh start," Worden said.

What happened instead has shaken the top coal-producing region in the United States. Blackjewel furloughed most of its Wyoming employees and shut down Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines, the first idled by hardship since coal mining in the Powder River Basin exploded in the 1970s.

It's a big hit to the region straddling northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana, where coal has quietly supported the economies of both states for decades and fuels a shrinking number of power plants in 28 states.
Negotiations that could reopen the two Wyoming mines under new ownership are stalled more than two months later. Some 600 employees remain off the job. And doubts are growing about the long-term viability of the region's coal mines.

"I don't think we'll ever be that naive again," said Worden, 44.
Blackjewel, based in Milton, West Virginia, told its Wyoming employees this week that the mines might be running again soon and to let the company know if they wanted their jobs back.
Worden said she felt little reassurance. She's not the only one questioning long-held assumptions about Powder River Basin mines, which produce cleaner-burning coal less expensively than mines in other parts of the U.S. and weren't widely thought of being at risk.

But with coal in long-term decline, how the basin might eventually scale down production to a sustainable level has become a big question, said Rob Godby, director of the Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy at the University of Wyoming.

"The irony here — and it's really a cruel irony — is everybody is focused on getting these miners back to work. But really the solution to creating a healthy industry is some mines close," Godby said.

For now, little appears changed in Gillette, a city of 30,000 at the heart of the basin of rolling grasslands where tattoo shops are abundant and big, late-model pickup trucks still cruise the main drag.
This year, however, has been especially tumultuous. Three of the Powder River Basin's nine producers — Westmoreland Coal, Cloud Peak Energy and Blackjewel — have filed for bankruptcy since March. Two others, Arch Coal and Peabody, say they will merge assets in the region.

The turmoil comes as U.S. coal production is down over 30 percent since peaking in 2008. Utilities are retiring aging coal-fired power plants and switching to solar, wind and cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas to generate electricity despite President Donald Trump's efforts to prop up the coal industry.
A decade ago, about half of U.S. electricity came from coal-fired power. Now it's below 30 percent, a shift that heavy equipment operator Rory Wallet saw as utilities became less willing to lock in multiyear contracts for Belle Ayr mine's coal.

"The market's changed," Wallet said. "The bankruptcies all tie into that."
Wallet, 40, who followed his father into the mine in 2008, said the recent closures and loss of his $80,000-a-year job surprised him. He has four children, and his wife's job at a restaurant in Gillette is their main income while they await news about the mines.

Blackjewel said Thursday that it was working on plans to restart the mines while pursuing their sale. There were no indications in federal bankruptcy court filings that the mines were set to reopen, however.
"This is a fast-moving and sometimes unpredictable process, and accordingly, we do not have answers to all of your questions at this time," the company's statement said.

Wallet is looking for a job and lobbying Wyoming lawmakers to fight harder to force Washington state to approve a port facility expansion that would allow more coal exports to Asia.
"The ports are going to be a big deal. Asia is going to be a big deal," Wallet said.
But Godby said the amount of coal that the proposed export terminal could handle would offset only a small fraction of the amount that production has declined.

Powder River Basin mines employ about 5,000 miners — 20 percent fewer than eight years ago. The impact is even wider because an additional 8,000 jobs, from teachers to car mechanics, have indirect ties to the coal industry.

Locals cheered when Trump lifted a federal moratorium on coal leases, but Worden and Wallet disagree about whether changing environmental regulations will do much good.
Both say coal should continue to have a place alongside renewable energy.
"It needs to be a group effort, not green is on one side and black is on the other," Worden said. "We don't want this community to die." ...
So you are saying that you Democrats want to open coal mines, and start burning for power?

Where is that candidate. I'll consider voting for them.
 

kyzr

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.

What if Solyndra went bankrupt? Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
 

Daryl Hunt

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.
What if Solyndra went bankrupt?
Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
So you are trying to move those goal posts once again. Your Gawd Rump promised that he would reopen the coal mines. Instead, they are closing at an alarming rate.

The Oil Companies are NOT going bankrupt. They are thriving. In fact, they can't seem to pump enough gas and oil.

The Solar Industry is building at an alarming rate as are the wind factories.

Tesla just became the premier auto battery manufacturer in the world. And are pushing their industrial battery packs for cities and factories to be used during peak periods.

Don't it chap your drawers that AOL is more right than wrong and you are more wrong than right? Your Gawd Rump is leading you unto tempation with his deceipt and lies by your own admission.

The world is changing.
 

blackhawk

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If Hillary had been elected the coal industry would be better off how? The lefts pride and joy the green new deal would benefit the coal industry how?
 

kyzr

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.
What if Solyndra went bankrupt?
Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
So you are trying to move those goal posts once again. Your Gawd Rump promised that he would reopen the coal mines. Instead, they are closing at an alarming rate.

The Oil Companies are NOT going bankrupt. They are thriving. In fact, they can't seem to pump enough gas and oil.

The Solar Industry is building at an alarming rate as are the wind factories.

Tesla just became the premier auto battery manufacturer in the world. And are pushing their industrial battery packs for cities and factories to be used during peak periods.

Don't it chap your drawers that AOL is more right than wrong and you are more wrong than right? Your Gawd Rump is leading you unto tempation with his deceipt and lies by your own admission.

The world is changing.
1. AOL is gone, my drawers are not chapped.
2. The US economy and stock market are doing very well thank you
3. I showed you credible links that many companies go bankrupt, that is NOT NEWS, that's business
4. If coal survives its thanks to Trump, if they don't that's business, no big deal. The dems promised to close them all, what's your point? You should be happy two closed.
 

whitehall

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Note to lefties, it might seem like a lifetime but Trump has only been in office for about 2 1/2 years. Wyoming mines are still suffering from policies instituted by the Obama administration. The question is whether it is good news or bad news if Wyoming mines shut down. it seems that lefties are willing to go either way.
 

Daryl Hunt

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.
What if Solyndra went bankrupt?
Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
So you are trying to move those goal posts once again. Your Gawd Rump promised that he would reopen the coal mines. Instead, they are closing at an alarming rate.

The Oil Companies are NOT going bankrupt. They are thriving. In fact, they can't seem to pump enough gas and oil.

The Solar Industry is building at an alarming rate as are the wind factories.

Tesla just became the premier auto battery manufacturer in the world. And are pushing their industrial battery packs for cities and factories to be used during peak periods.

Don't it chap your drawers that AOL is more right than wrong and you are more wrong than right? Your Gawd Rump is leading you unto tempation with his deceipt and lies by your own admission.

The world is changing.
1. AOL is gone, my drawers are not chapped.
2. The US economy and stock market are doing very well thank you
3. I showed you credible links that many companies go bankrupt, that is NOT NEWS, that's business
4. If coal survives its thanks to Trump, if they don't that's business, no big deal. The dems promised to close them all, what's your point? You should be happy two closed.
The Dems did NOT claim to want to close them. They stated fact. Lessening the dependency on coal means fewer coal jobs. You claim to be a Economic Powerhouse. Well, that's economics 101. Less demand, less product needed, fewer jobs. It's pretty simple. Or did I type too fast.

And it IS a big deal. Unless alternative jobs are found for those folks then entire cities and towns are devastated.
 

Weatherman2020

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Another Donald Trump gut decision goes haywire as coal mines go bankrupt and the existence of communities is threatened.

Perhaps Donald Trump should visit and throw some rolls of toilet paper to these victims of his gut-wrenching policies. "At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit."

Donald Trump's rollback of EPA regulations was not enough to save the coal industry.

The economy of the US is creaking as Donald Trump's gut decisions prove wrong consistently and painfully.

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

MEAD GRUVER, Associated Press•September 14, 2019

The shutdown of Blackjewel LLC's Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte mines in Wyoming since July 1, 2019 has added yet more uncertainty to the Powder River Basin's struggling coal economy.

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit.

Warehouse technician Melissa Worden divvied up what remained, giving four rolls to each mine and two to the mine supply facility where she worked.

Then mine owner Blackjewel LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on July 1. Worden figured the accounts would get settled quickly.
"The consensus was: In 30 days, we'll look back on this, and we made it through, and we'll be up and running, and it's a fresh start," Worden said.

What happened instead has shaken the top coal-producing region in the United States. Blackjewel furloughed most of its Wyoming employees and shut down Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines, the first idled by hardship since coal mining in the Powder River Basin exploded in the 1970s.

It's a big hit to the region straddling northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana, where coal has quietly supported the economies of both states for decades and fuels a shrinking number of power plants in 28 states.
Negotiations that could reopen the two Wyoming mines under new ownership are stalled more than two months later. Some 600 employees remain off the job. And doubts are growing about the long-term viability of the region's coal mines.

"I don't think we'll ever be that naive again," said Worden, 44.
Blackjewel, based in Milton, West Virginia, told its Wyoming employees this week that the mines might be running again soon and to let the company know if they wanted their jobs back.
Worden said she felt little reassurance. She's not the only one questioning long-held assumptions about Powder River Basin mines, which produce cleaner-burning coal less expensively than mines in other parts of the U.S. and weren't widely thought of being at risk.

But with coal in long-term decline, how the basin might eventually scale down production to a sustainable level has become a big question, said Rob Godby, director of the Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy at the University of Wyoming.

"The irony here — and it's really a cruel irony — is everybody is focused on getting these miners back to work. But really the solution to creating a healthy industry is some mines close," Godby said.

For now, little appears changed in Gillette, a city of 30,000 at the heart of the basin of rolling grasslands where tattoo shops are abundant and big, late-model pickup trucks still cruise the main drag.
This year, however, has been especially tumultuous. Three of the Powder River Basin's nine producers — Westmoreland Coal, Cloud Peak Energy and Blackjewel — have filed for bankruptcy since March. Two others, Arch Coal and Peabody, say they will merge assets in the region.

The turmoil comes as U.S. coal production is down over 30 percent since peaking in 2008. Utilities are retiring aging coal-fired power plants and switching to solar, wind and cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas to generate electricity despite President Donald Trump's efforts to prop up the coal industry.
A decade ago, about half of U.S. electricity came from coal-fired power. Now it's below 30 percent, a shift that heavy equipment operator Rory Wallet saw as utilities became less willing to lock in multiyear contracts for Belle Ayr mine's coal.

"The market's changed," Wallet said. "The bankruptcies all tie into that."
Wallet, 40, who followed his father into the mine in 2008, said the recent closures and loss of his $80,000-a-year job surprised him. He has four children, and his wife's job at a restaurant in Gillette is their main income while they await news about the mines.

Blackjewel said Thursday that it was working on plans to restart the mines while pursuing their sale. There were no indications in federal bankruptcy court filings that the mines were set to reopen, however.
"This is a fast-moving and sometimes unpredictable process, and accordingly, we do not have answers to all of your questions at this time," the company's statement said.

Wallet is looking for a job and lobbying Wyoming lawmakers to fight harder to force Washington state to approve a port facility expansion that would allow more coal exports to Asia.
"The ports are going to be a big deal. Asia is going to be a big deal," Wallet said.
But Godby said the amount of coal that the proposed export terminal could handle would offset only a small fraction of the amount that production has declined.

Powder River Basin mines employ about 5,000 miners — 20 percent fewer than eight years ago. The impact is even wider because an additional 8,000 jobs, from teachers to car mechanics, have indirect ties to the coal industry.

Locals cheered when Trump lifted a federal moratorium on coal leases, but Worden and Wallet disagree about whether changing environmental regulations will do much good.
Both say coal should continue to have a place alongside renewable energy.
"It needs to be a group effort, not green is on one side and black is on the other," Worden said. "We don't want this community to die." ...
Vote Democrat to open coal mines!
 

Correll

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Another Donald Trump gut decision goes haywire as coal mines go bankrupt and the existence of communities is threatened.

Perhaps Donald Trump should visit and throw some rolls of toilet paper to these victims of his gut-wrenching policies. "At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit."

Donald Trump's rollback of EPA regulations was not enough to save the coal industry.

The economy of the US is creaking as Donald Trump's gut decisions prove wrong consistently and painfully.

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

Mine shutdowns in top US coal region bring new uncertainty

MEAD GRUVER, Associated Press•September 14, 2019

The shutdown of Blackjewel LLC's Belle Ayr and Eagle Butte mines in Wyoming since July 1, 2019 has added yet more uncertainty to the Powder River Basin's struggling coal economy.

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — At two of the world's biggest coal mines, the finances got so bad that their owner couldn't even get toilet paper on credit.

Warehouse technician Melissa Worden divvied up what remained, giving four rolls to each mine and two to the mine supply facility where she worked.

Then mine owner Blackjewel LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on July 1. Worden figured the accounts would get settled quickly.
"The consensus was: In 30 days, we'll look back on this, and we made it through, and we'll be up and running, and it's a fresh start," Worden said.

What happened instead has shaken the top coal-producing region in the United States. Blackjewel furloughed most of its Wyoming employees and shut down Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines, the first idled by hardship since coal mining in the Powder River Basin exploded in the 1970s.

It's a big hit to the region straddling northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana, where coal has quietly supported the economies of both states for decades and fuels a shrinking number of power plants in 28 states.
Negotiations that could reopen the two Wyoming mines under new ownership are stalled more than two months later. Some 600 employees remain off the job. And doubts are growing about the long-term viability of the region's coal mines.

"I don't think we'll ever be that naive again," said Worden, 44.
Blackjewel, based in Milton, West Virginia, told its Wyoming employees this week that the mines might be running again soon and to let the company know if they wanted their jobs back.
Worden said she felt little reassurance. She's not the only one questioning long-held assumptions about Powder River Basin mines, which produce cleaner-burning coal less expensively than mines in other parts of the U.S. and weren't widely thought of being at risk.

But with coal in long-term decline, how the basin might eventually scale down production to a sustainable level has become a big question, said Rob Godby, director of the Center for Energy Economics and Public Policy at the University of Wyoming.

"The irony here — and it's really a cruel irony — is everybody is focused on getting these miners back to work. But really the solution to creating a healthy industry is some mines close," Godby said.

For now, little appears changed in Gillette, a city of 30,000 at the heart of the basin of rolling grasslands where tattoo shops are abundant and big, late-model pickup trucks still cruise the main drag.
This year, however, has been especially tumultuous. Three of the Powder River Basin's nine producers — Westmoreland Coal, Cloud Peak Energy and Blackjewel — have filed for bankruptcy since March. Two others, Arch Coal and Peabody, say they will merge assets in the region.

The turmoil comes as U.S. coal production is down over 30 percent since peaking in 2008. Utilities are retiring aging coal-fired power plants and switching to solar, wind and cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas to generate electricity despite President Donald Trump's efforts to prop up the coal industry.
A decade ago, about half of U.S. electricity came from coal-fired power. Now it's below 30 percent, a shift that heavy equipment operator Rory Wallet saw as utilities became less willing to lock in multiyear contracts for Belle Ayr mine's coal.

"The market's changed," Wallet said. "The bankruptcies all tie into that."
Wallet, 40, who followed his father into the mine in 2008, said the recent closures and loss of his $80,000-a-year job surprised him. He has four children, and his wife's job at a restaurant in Gillette is their main income while they await news about the mines.

Blackjewel said Thursday that it was working on plans to restart the mines while pursuing their sale. There were no indications in federal bankruptcy court filings that the mines were set to reopen, however.
"This is a fast-moving and sometimes unpredictable process, and accordingly, we do not have answers to all of your questions at this time," the company's statement said.

Wallet is looking for a job and lobbying Wyoming lawmakers to fight harder to force Washington state to approve a port facility expansion that would allow more coal exports to Asia.
"The ports are going to be a big deal. Asia is going to be a big deal," Wallet said.
But Godby said the amount of coal that the proposed export terminal could handle would offset only a small fraction of the amount that production has declined.

Powder River Basin mines employ about 5,000 miners — 20 percent fewer than eight years ago. The impact is even wider because an additional 8,000 jobs, from teachers to car mechanics, have indirect ties to the coal industry.

Locals cheered when Trump lifted a federal moratorium on coal leases, but Worden and Wallet disagree about whether changing environmental regulations will do much good.
Both say coal should continue to have a place alongside renewable energy.
"It needs to be a group effort, not green is on one side and black is on the other," Worden said. "We don't want this community to die." ...


Wait, I thought the coal mining was an 18th century industry and nothing Trump could do would save it,


and now you are instead saying that something he did, is responsible for it declining?


You lefties really will say just any shit, that serves your partisan purpose at that second, with out any humanity in you at all.



SHUT YOUR FACE ANUS.
 

kyzr

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.
What if Solyndra went bankrupt?
Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
So you are trying to move those goal posts once again. Your Gawd Rump promised that he would reopen the coal mines. Instead, they are closing at an alarming rate.

The Oil Companies are NOT going bankrupt. They are thriving. In fact, they can't seem to pump enough gas and oil.

The Solar Industry is building at an alarming rate as are the wind factories.

Tesla just became the premier auto battery manufacturer in the world. And are pushing their industrial battery packs for cities and factories to be used during peak periods.

Don't it chap your drawers that AOL is more right than wrong and you are more wrong than right? Your Gawd Rump is leading you unto tempation with his deceipt and lies by your own admission.

The world is changing.
1. AOL is gone, my drawers are not chapped.
2. The US economy and stock market are doing very well thank you
3. I showed you credible links that many companies go bankrupt, that is NOT NEWS, that's business
4. If coal survives its thanks to Trump, if they don't that's business, no big deal. The dems promised to close them all, what's your point? You should be happy two closed.
The Dems did NOT claim to want to close them. They stated fact. Lessening the dependency on coal means fewer coal jobs. You claim to be a Economic Powerhouse. Well, that's economics 101. Less demand, less product needed, fewer jobs. It's pretty simple. Or did I type too fast.

And it IS a big deal. Unless alternative jobs are found for those folks then entire cities and towns are devastated.
1. Yes the dems do claim to close coal plants
Trump Campaign Spotlights Biden's Vow to Ban Fossil Fuels | RealClearPolitics
2. The "green new deal" closes all fossil fuel plants. Green New Deal - Wikipedia
3. The dems can't create jobs, they can only lose them, businesses create jobs.
 
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Stoppit! You're killing me.

Trump digs coal and he has dug under the expectations of the miners and communities as coal continues its demise.

Everything touched by Donald Trump becomes despised and useless.

Donald Trump is 'The First Excavator of Expectations'.

Donald Trump digs votes and he couldn't give a shit about coal or the environment.

 

Daryl Hunt

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I'm not sure why the OP is cheering the loss of two coal mines in WY?
Many coal users are switching from coal to natural gas, its cheaper and cleaner to use, which means more profit.
What if Solyndra went bankrupt?
Solyndra misled the feds out of over $500 million. Why you should care
What if 15 oil companies went bankrupt? The 15 Biggest Oil Bankruptcies (So Far)
What if the solar panel industry went bankrupt? The U.S. Solar Industry Has Been Dead For Years, So Why The Tariffs? | Seeking Alpha

Companies come and companies go, WTF??
So you are trying to move those goal posts once again. Your Gawd Rump promised that he would reopen the coal mines. Instead, they are closing at an alarming rate.

The Oil Companies are NOT going bankrupt. They are thriving. In fact, they can't seem to pump enough gas and oil.

The Solar Industry is building at an alarming rate as are the wind factories.

Tesla just became the premier auto battery manufacturer in the world. And are pushing their industrial battery packs for cities and factories to be used during peak periods.

Don't it chap your drawers that AOL is more right than wrong and you are more wrong than right? Your Gawd Rump is leading you unto tempation with his deceipt and lies by your own admission.

The world is changing.
1. AOL is gone, my drawers are not chapped.
2. The US economy and stock market are doing very well thank you
3. I showed you credible links that many companies go bankrupt, that is NOT NEWS, that's business
4. If coal survives its thanks to Trump, if they don't that's business, no big deal. The dems promised to close them all, what's your point? You should be happy two closed.
The Dems did NOT claim to want to close them. They stated fact. Lessening the dependency on coal means fewer coal jobs. You claim to be a Economic Powerhouse. Well, that's economics 101. Less demand, less product needed, fewer jobs. It's pretty simple. Or did I type too fast.

And it IS a big deal. Unless alternative jobs are found for those folks then entire cities and towns are devastated.
1. Yes the dems do claim to close coal plants
Trump Campaign Spotlights Biden's Vow to Ban Fossil Fuels | RealClearPolitics
2. The "green new deal" closes all fossil fuel plants. Green New Deal - Wikipedia
3. The dems can't create jobs, they can only lose them, businesses create jobs.
1. We need to close the Power Generating Coal Plants. All of them. Unless you want to raise the consumer prices to pay for the expensive scrubbers to make them clean to compete. And we already know that just ain't gonna happen, cupcake.

2. The Green New Deal does want to close all fossil fuel plants. Yes, but it never says when. It's an open ended item. And we already know that we are right on the edge of super clean power. We just aren't quite there yet. It's coming, cupcake.

3. The Government (notice I am not bringing in politics on this one) can make things conducive to help to create jobs. As old style jobs disappear, new ones need to be created. But first we need to get rid of the logjams (YOU) out of the way to get them out of the way to set up a condition to create those jobs.

It's not about bad politics. It's about survival. And we can't survive much longer with your criminal actions in charge. Rumps getting rid of the Water Purification Regs is NOT a step in the right direction. I don't know of a single state that will back that one. Certainly not the states that provide the water to the other states. Most of the States are abiding by the Paris Accords even though Rump is backing out of it. Rump is not all powerful no matter what you believe.
 

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
 
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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Donald Trump is great at picking losers. The most abject losers congregate around Trump and howl rapturously at his rallies.

Donald Trump's gut hasn't picked a winner yet.
 

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Donald Trump is great at picking losers. The most abject losers congregate around Trump and howl rapturously at his rallies.

Donald Trump's gut hasn't picked a winner yet.

People like you, constantly express your hate for people like me, and then wonder why we think that people like you, might not be the best to represent our interests in government.


And in your mind, this is something wrong with us.


You are so full of hate, that it makes you bat shit crazy.



Trump might be a lot of things. But at least he doesn't hate us, the way you liberals do.
 

Daryl Hunt

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Rump lied about it and used it to garner votes. It's not his fault coal jobs are going away. But he lied about it to get elected in the first place and, to this day, still tries to promote that lie. Reality is not one of his strong suits.
 

Correll

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Rump lied about it and used it to garner votes. It's not his fault coal jobs are going away. But he lied about it to get elected in the first place and, to this day, still tries to promote that lie. Reality is not one of his strong suits.

Hard to take you seriously when you talk like a baby.
 

Daryl Hunt

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Donald Trump is great at picking losers. The most abject losers congregate around Trump and howl rapturously at his rallies.

Donald Trump's gut hasn't picked a winner yet.

People like you, constantly express your hate for people like me, and then wonder why we think that people like you, might not be the best to represent our interests in government.


And in your mind, this is something wrong with us.


You are so full of hate, that it makes you bat shit crazy.



Trump might be a lot of things. But at least he doesn't hate us, the way you liberals do.
I don't hate you. I pity you.
 

Daryl Hunt

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Of course, it's all Trump's fault. Whenever anything negative happens, you guys find some way to blame it on Trump, even though Trump has done all he could to revive the coal industry. Coal mining is declining because there has been a massive decline in the demand for coal because of the huge increase in natural gas, which is cheaper and easier to obtain than coal.

The withering of the American coal industry
Rump lied about it and used it to garner votes. It's not his fault coal jobs are going away. But he lied about it to get elected in the first place and, to this day, still tries to promote that lie. Reality is not one of his strong suits.

Hard to take you seriously when you talk like a baby.
When someone posts like that it tells me that it's a GRU influenced post. Your post is to distract and divide. Standard GRU method. Well, Ivan, you did your job. Do they pay you in Rubles or do you take it out in Vodka and Caviar instead.
 

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