The Progs will DENY SCIENCE when it comes to record snowfalls, that havent happened like this over 100 years.

Dagosa

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
~75 mm or 2.95 in. Which is exactly ~75 mm or 2.95 in of what it would have been if man never existed.

I think you should look again if you think 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island would be submerged by a 1 ft rise in sea level.
As you can see, level changes can be naturally very extreme. Similar changes today would be catastrophic. IT DOESN'T MATTER IF SEA LEVEL RISES DUE TO MAN OR NOT!


I never said 1/2 of Brooklyn would be submerged, I said it would disappear. A subtle but important difference.
Do you realize how many different mechanisms and drivers there were over this period of time? Can you please try to make an honest argument. Start from this curve here...

View attachment 406020
I would be easier if we just used more recent times:

Maybe you can answer a question, why does it matter what the causes are?
It matters because the rise has accelerated faster due to man’s activity. A slower rate of change over thousands of years, is no big deal. We adjust easily. That same change over decades is very costly and more damaging to adjust to.
Probably all true but it still doesn't matter if the rise has accelerated faster due to man’s activity or if is 100% natural. The effects are the same.
What.,..did you tell the cop who picked you up for speeding, that it doesn’t matter if the driver is responsible or the car just naturally went too fast.

Of course it mattees. If it’s man made, we have the opportunity to slow the rate of change. How long did you sleep in science class ?
 

alang1216

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
 

ding

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Ummm... so you deny that the driver for increased CO2 emissions is population growth?

population vs carbon emissions.jpg
 

alang1216

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
~75 mm or 2.95 in. Which is exactly ~75 mm or 2.95 in of what it would have been if man never existed.

I think you should look again if you think 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island would be submerged by a 1 ft rise in sea level.
As you can see, level changes can be naturally very extreme. Similar changes today would be catastrophic. IT DOESN'T MATTER IF SEA LEVEL RISES DUE TO MAN OR NOT!


I never said 1/2 of Brooklyn would be submerged, I said it would disappear. A subtle but important difference.
Do you realize how many different mechanisms and drivers there were over this period of time? Can you please try to make an honest argument. Start from this curve here...

View attachment 406020
I would be easier if we just used more recent times:

Maybe you can answer a question, why does it matter what the causes are?
It matters because the rise has accelerated faster due to man’s activity. A slower rate of change over thousands of years, is no big deal. We adjust easily. That same change over decades is very costly and more damaging to adjust to.
Probably all true but it still doesn't matter if the rise has accelerated faster due to man’s activity or if is 100% natural. The effects are the same.
What.,..did you tell the cop who picked you up for speeding, that it doesn’t matter if the driver is responsible or the car just naturally went too fast.

Of course it mattees. If it’s man made, we have the opportunity to slow the rate of change. How long did you sleep in science class ?
So you're saying if it is natural we can't slow the rate of change or that we shouldn't?
 

ding

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the population growth is occurring in the less developed regions of the world?

Population-Growth-in-Different-Economies.jpg
 

ding

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the increases in CO2 emissions is coming from the less developed, poorer regions of the world?

1603574318677.png


1603574359476.png


1603574388161.png
 

alang1216

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No matter how poor you are, you don't rob from yourself. The key is private ownership for things like solar panels.
Horsefeathers ... give a man a car who can't afford gasoline ... that man will sell that car ... give a man a solar panel who doesn't own any electric appliances ... that man will sell that solar panel ...

If someone gave you a Lear Jet ... would you keep it and pay the tie-down rental at the local airport? ... knowing you could never pay for the FAA required annual inspection ... God forbid starting one of the engines ...
Gee, maybe we should give solar panels to people who actually use electricity! No one would have thought of that.
 

ding

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No matter how poor you are, you don't rob from yourself. The key is private ownership for things like solar panels.
Horsefeathers ... give a man a car who can't afford gasoline ... that man will sell that car ... give a man a solar panel who doesn't own any electric appliances ... that man will sell that solar panel ...

If someone gave you a Lear Jet ... would you keep it and pay the tie-down rental at the local airport? ... knowing you could never pay for the FAA required annual inspection ... God forbid starting one of the engines ...
Gee, maybe we should give solar panels to people who actually use electricity! No one would have thought of that.
So you believe people who don't use electricity are the ones responsible for a 1 billion ton per year per year increase in carbon emissions?

C'mon man.
 

aaronleland

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I live in the Northeast, and it's been close to 80 degrees for a week now. Is that proof global warming exists?
 

Ben Thomson

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Think about it, the industrial revolution was in full swing when Woodrow Wilson(racist who segregated the government) was in office, during that time tons of CO2 was put into the air, the ratio went from 3 parts per million to 4 parts per million(that is 1/1000000) increase as the Progs say, yet we have record snowfall again, so early in the year. The progs had said that snow would disappear and that was 6 years ago, yet here we are once again, proving that "settled science" isnt really settled. Next time you see a Prog give him the 1 finger salute.

The precipitation tapered off Tuesday night after 7.9 inches of snow at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, shattering the previous record for Oct. 20 of 3 inches, set in 1916, and nearly besting the all-time snowiest October day in the Twin Cities.
Climate change = extreme weather patterns out of the norm. Not Rocket science Trump Boy
 

alang1216

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the increases in CO2 emissions is coming from the less developed, poorer regions of the world?

View attachment 406132

View attachment 406133

View attachment 406134
Looks like it.
 

alang1216

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No matter how poor you are, you don't rob from yourself. The key is private ownership for things like solar panels.
Horsefeathers ... give a man a car who can't afford gasoline ... that man will sell that car ... give a man a solar panel who doesn't own any electric appliances ... that man will sell that solar panel ...

If someone gave you a Lear Jet ... would you keep it and pay the tie-down rental at the local airport? ... knowing you could never pay for the FAA required annual inspection ... God forbid starting one of the engines ...
Gee, maybe we should give solar panels to people who actually use electricity! No one would have thought of that.
So you believe people who don't use electricity are the ones responsible for a 1 billion ton per year per year increase in carbon emissions?

C'mon man.
Do they burn wood, coal, or gas? How do they cook their food or heat their homes?
 

alang1216

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the population growth is occurring in the less developed regions of the world?

View attachment 406129
Cause or correlation? No idea.
 

ding

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No matter how poor you are, you don't rob from yourself. The key is private ownership for things like solar panels.
Horsefeathers ... give a man a car who can't afford gasoline ... that man will sell that car ... give a man a solar panel who doesn't own any electric appliances ... that man will sell that solar panel ...

If someone gave you a Lear Jet ... would you keep it and pay the tie-down rental at the local airport? ... knowing you could never pay for the FAA required annual inspection ... God forbid starting one of the engines ...
Gee, maybe we should give solar panels to people who actually use electricity! No one would have thought of that.
So you believe people who don't use electricity are the ones responsible for a 1 billion ton per year per year increase in carbon emissions?

C'mon man.
Do they burn wood, coal, or gas? How do they cook their food or heat their homes?
Why? Are you offering to pay for their solar?

-*
 
Last edited:

ding

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the increases in CO2 emissions is coming from the less developed, poorer regions of the world?

View attachment 406132

View attachment 406133

View attachment 406134
Looks like it.
So... what's the problem?
 

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the population growth is occurring in the less developed regions of the world?

View attachment 406129
Cause or correlation? No idea.
Really? You don't understand the simple concept that every person has a carbon footprint?

This is you being dishonest.
 

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the population growth is occurring in the less developed regions of the world?

View attachment 406129
Cause or correlation? No idea.
How about now?

.

Still no idea?
 

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First, I have no idea how you connect sea level rise to firewood. Do you?
You didn't answer my question ... do you agree we should substantially increase our CO2 emissions for the humanitarian purposes that would serve? ...

Second, you have no background in the dynamics of coastlines like those of the US East Coast. Every inch of sea level rise will act to push the barrier islands inland and flood the coastal plains. A rise of a foot may translate to a mile of lost land (I don't know the exact relationship). That is one mile all along the thousand of miles of US coasts. Sea walls will only be a temporary solution.
That's why we replenish the beach sand there on a regular basis ... we have maps of the coastline from the Revolutionary War ... and we've seen 2 feet sea level rise since then ... and it "may" erode a mile of coastline in a few places, so maybe find out the exact relationship if you're such an expert and coastal erosion ... are you seriously suggesting New York City was two miles removed from the ocean when it was founded? ...

Not a problem on The West Coast ... where mountains meet the sea ...
NYC has been extensively reclaimed from the sea so it's coast is now man-made. I do know that it suffered some major flooding when hit by a hurricane a few years ago, the first I recall. They are now spending billions to secure a small part of the city. Not every city can afford to do that.
Storm surges are typically in the 5 to 10 ft range. You are equating a 3 mm/yr rise in sea level - which has been occurring for the last 6,000 years and before that was occurring at a much greater rate - to surge produced by a hurricane?

Have you even looked at a topographical map of New York to visualize what a one foot rise in sea level actually means?
What has been the rise in the last 25 years?

Looks to me 1/2 of Brooklyn and Long Island may disappear.
So I am curious... do you believe you even understand the problem and what should be done about it real terms?

If so, can you tell me how you would solve the problem?
The first thing we need to do is get our heads out of our butts and face facts. I'd guess there is no simple solution since it is a complex problem. We need to find the low-hanging fruit and continue to explore more dramatic solutions.
The first thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about what the problem is. Something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. The second thing people - who are trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist - need to do is to be honest about the solution. Also something I have yet heard anyone from your "camp" do. Now the only reason that I can think of why they haven't done those things is because if they do those things, people like yourself who support solving a problem that doesn't exist would actually start to question what they have been told.
I always question what I'm told. For instance, you have not provided convincing evidence so I question your statements.
Do you deny that the population growth is occurring in the less developed regions of the world?

View attachment 406129
Cause or correlation? No idea.
How about now?


"...A 2009 study of the relationship between population growth and global warming determined that the “carbon legacy” of just one child can produce 20 times more greenhouse gas than a person will save by driving a high-mileage car, recycling, using energy-efficient appliances and light bulbs, etc. Each child born in the United States will add about 9,441 metric tons of carbon dioxide to the carbon legacy of an average parent. The study concludes, “Clearly, the potential savings from reduced reproduction are huge compared to the savings that can be achieved by changes in lifestyle.”

Still no idea?
 

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I could keep on going because there are no studies that say population growth does not drive increased CO2 emissions. All of the studies say population growth drives increased CO2 emissions.

But I guess if one wanted to make a dishonest argument then one wouldn't have any idea if population growth was a cause or correlation for increase CO2 emissions.
 

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And this Virginia is why no one believes climate alarmists... they can't even acknowledge simple, self evident facts when it is staring them in the face.
 
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