The NYT Strikes Another Blow For Collectivism

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
(Sung to the refrain of "Just Prancing In The Conga Line")

"Posted on September 11, 2011 by Scott Johnson in Liberals

Krugmania strikes deep

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman writes on his New York Times blog:

Is it just me, or are the 9/11 commemorations oddly subdued?

Actually, I don’t think it’s me, and it’s not really that odd.

What happened after 9/11 — and I think even people on the right know this, whether they admit it or not — was deeply shameful. Te atrocity should have been a unifying event, but instead it became a wedge issue. Fake heroes like Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani, and, yes, George W. Bush raced to cash in on the horror. And then the attack was used to justify an unrelated war the neocons wanted to fight, for all the wrong reasons.

A lot of other people behaved badly. How many of our professional pundits — people who should have understood very well what was happening — took the easy way out, turning a blind eye to the corruption and lending their support to the hijacking of the atrocity?

The memory of 9/11 has been irrevocably poisoned; it has become an occasion for shame. And in its heart, the nation knows it.

I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons.

This does not appear to be the work of a Krugman impersonator."


Krugmania strikes deep | Power Line
 

ogibillm

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
14,029
Reaction score
1,618
Points
245
Krugman is projecting. He's part of the "We deserved it!!" crowd.

He's an idiot.
to a certain extent he's right though. giuliani based a presidential campaign on it. W found a way to work 9/11 into just about any political speech he ever made. hell country musicians (looking at you, toby keith) capitalized on it to an unbelievable extreme.

We mounted wars in iraq and afghanistan on premises that never would have passed the smell test had people not been so caught up in post 9/11 hysteria. people tried to use it to deny muslims property and worship rights.

there were some good things that came out of the tragedy, lots of them, but there are some things we did as a nation, and allowed to be done, that we should rightfully be ashamed of.
 

daveman

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
61,848
Reaction score
12,033
Points
2,180
Location
On the way to the Dark Tower.
Krugman is projecting. He's part of the "We deserved it!!" crowd.

He's an idiot.
to a certain extent he's right though. giuliani based a presidential campaign on it. W found a way to work 9/11 into just about any political speech he ever made. hell country musicians (looking at you, toby keith) capitalized on it to an unbelievable extreme.

We mounted wars in iraq and afghanistan on premises that never would have passed the smell test had people not been so caught up in post 9/11 hysteria. people tried to use it to deny muslims property and worship rights.

there were some good things that came out of the tragedy, lots of them, but there are some things we did as a nation, and allowed to be done, that we should rightfully be ashamed of.
You can be ashamed if you want. Don't presume to tell me I should be as well.

BC titled this thread correctly. Krugman, the Times, and now you are telling everyone how we should feel.
 

C_Clayton_Jones

Diamond Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2011
Messages
56,430
Reaction score
14,087
Points
2,180
Location
In a Republic, actually
to a certain extent he's right though. giuliani based a presidential campaign on it. W found a way to work 9/11 into just about any political speech he ever made. hell country musicians (looking at you, toby keith) capitalized on it to an unbelievable extreme.

We mounted wars in iraq and afghanistan on premises that never would have passed the smell test had people not been so caught up in post 9/11 hysteria. people tried to use it to deny muslims property and worship rights.

there were some good things that came out of the tragedy, lots of them, but there are some things we did as a nation, and allowed to be done, that we should rightfully be ashamed of.
True.

And when we violate the fundamental tenets of the Bill of Rights, such as the Patriot Act, for example, in the context of ‘security,’ we provide yet another victory to the terrorists.
 

ogibillm

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
14,029
Reaction score
1,618
Points
245
You can be ashamed if you want. Don't presume to tell me I should be as well.

BC titled this thread correctly. Krugman, the Times, and now you are telling everyone how we should feel.
fine. if you're okay with allowing politicians to blatantly use a tragedy for their own ends that's okay with me. if you're fine with the american people, the press, and our elected officials not doing their duty and allowing us to go to war because we were caught up in hysteria that's fine.

and if you aren't ashamed of those things, if you are fine with them, what would you be ashamed of?

is there anything that we as a country could do that would embarass you?
 

ogibillm

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
14,029
Reaction score
1,618
Points
245
to a certain extent he's right though. giuliani based a presidential campaign on it. W found a way to work 9/11 into just about any political speech he ever made. hell country musicians (looking at you, toby keith) capitalized on it to an unbelievable extreme.

We mounted wars in iraq and afghanistan on premises that never would have passed the smell test had people not been so caught up in post 9/11 hysteria. people tried to use it to deny muslims property and worship rights.

there were some good things that came out of the tragedy, lots of them, but there are some things we did as a nation, and allowed to be done, that we should rightfully be ashamed of.
True.

And when we violate the fundamental tenets of the Bill of Rights, such as the Patriot Act, for example, in the context of ‘security,’ we provide yet another victory to the terrorists.
can't believe i forgot to include that.
 

Moonglow

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
148,014
Reaction score
16,458
Points
2,220
Location
sw mizzouri
and then there was gnashing of the teeth and rending of clothing.
 
OP
B

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
During WWII an American soldier on the front lines often found himself going through the belongings of an equally young German soldier he had just shot dead because the German soldier had refused to lay his weapons down and surrender. The American, after going through the dead soldiers personal effects, pictures of his mother, father, wife, girlfriend or children, the American soldier would likely remark to himself how much he and the young German he had just faced were alike. The next day the young American would likely be in contact with another young German who would likewise refuse to surrender and he would again be forced to shoot.
In the intervening sixty six years since, America has witnessed two phenomena, the rise of the Nanny State and the collusion of the NEA and the other teachers associations with their conspirators in the Democratic Party to stop teaching history in the public schools, casting the nation's schoolchildren adrift, cutting them off from their historical moorings. The Nanny State meanwhile has deprived American Society of most of its incentives to survive, thrive and succeed, producing a very fertile field in which to sow and reap subversion.
The absolute lack of any shred of knowlege of American history, where we came from, how we got here, has left Americans bereft of any inkling of how this nation got to the point where the Government saw fit and its way to install the Nanny State upoon us. The have no clue that the reason Hirohito surrendered on August 15th, 1945 was that he was faced with the extinction of the Japanese people, it was no longer a question of whether the war was lost, it was whether there would be any Japanese people left alive after the final shots were fired.
American People today have absolutely no idea of just how much sacrifice, resolve, determination and intestinal fortitude it took to win that war, a war fought against two societies driven by visions of racial and ethnic superiority whose philosophies were rooted in the twelfth and foutrteenth centuries.
The Marines on Iwo Jima were faced with 21,000 resourceful, relentless, determined defenders who would not surrender under any circumstances. They were forced to kill all but 200 of those defenders in order to secure the island. On Okinawa, half a month later, American soldiers and sailors faced nearly the same prospect against 120,000 Japanese defenders. They persevered in spite of this advance knowledge and they would have done so again on the Home Islands of Honshu and Hokkaido had they been asked.
Islam is a religion rooted in the philosophies and precepts of an even earlier era than the Japanese and the Germans, the Eight Century, and their warriors ethos is quite similar to the Japanese Warrior's of 66years ago. The Chinese populations that found themselves under Islam's sway were fully converted in two generations. The men were all killed and the women became concubines.
Osama bhin Laden remarked on the eve of the 9/11 attacks that America was like a "Weak Horse. Everybody prefers a strong horse to the weak one". Instead of collapsing immediately after the attacks took place, it took eighty six months before Amercans, aided and abetted by men like Paul Krugman of the NYT, and in contrast to their forebears, who arrived here seeking Liberty's promise "to breathe free", instead, seeking the promises of a benevolent master, elected the chimera Barack Hussein Obama. It is thirty two months into his reign and the American economy profoundly feels the effects of the chains and bonds he and his followers have slipped onto it, yet they still await the full placement of Obama's bonds and chains personally on them. When they finally arrive, you who voted for and sought his mastery, will have eminently deserved them.
 
Last edited:
OP
B

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
i'm sorry, was there a pertinent, coherent thought in that (likely copied & pasted) drivel?
(Other than Osama bin Laden won in his declared war on America, because we were indeed the "Weak Horse" as bin Laden so condescendingly referred to us

More Leftist Revolutionary drivel here from the NYT, "Pinch" is not shouting "Long Live Che Guevara! Vive La Revolucion!" here but he might as well be....)

"No Regrets for a Love Of Explosives; In a Memoir of Sorts, a War Protester Talks of Life With the Weathermen

By DINITIA SMITH

Published: September 11, 2001"
"I don't regret setting bombs,'' Bill Ayers said. ''I feel we didn't do enough.'' Mr. Ayers, who spent the 1970's as a fugitive in the Weather Underground, was sitting in the kitchen of his big turn-of-the-19th-century stone house in the Hyde Park district of Chicago. The long curly locks in his Wanted poster are shorn, though he wears earrings. He still has tattooed on his neck the rainbow-and-lightning Weathermen logo that appeared on letters taking responsibility for bombings. And he still has the ebullient, ingratiating manner, the apparently intense interest in other people, that made him a charismatic figure in the radical student movement.

Now he has written a book, ''Fugitive Days'' (Beacon Press, September). Mr. Ayers, who is 56, calls it a memoir, somewhat coyly perhaps, since he also says some of it is fiction. He writes that he participated in the bombings of New York City Police Headquarters in 1970, of the Capitol building in 1971, the Pentagon in 1972. But Mr. Ayers also seems to want to have it both ways, taking responsibility for daring acts in his youth, then deflecting it. "


No Regrets for a Love Of Explosives - In a Memoir of Sorts, a War Protester Talks of Life With the Weathermen - NYTimes.com
 

Trajan

conscientia mille testes
Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
29,048
Reaction score
5,458
Points
48
Location
The Bay Area Soviet
at the bottom of his 'message' he adds;

"I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons".


yea you bet, what a DB.....he could have waited a day or 2 or posted this earlier in the week if he had too, but, hey, when you're an over the edge into the abyss liberal as he is, tact apparently is not a commodity in abundance.
 

ogibillm

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
14,029
Reaction score
1,618
Points
245
at the bottom of his 'message' he adds;

"I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons".


yea you bet, what a DB.....he could have waited a day or 2 or posted this earlier in the week if he had too, but, hey, when you're an over the edge into the abyss liberal as he is, tact apparently is not a commodity in abundance.
if you're going to reflect on 9/11, you might as well reflect on the whole - even, perhaps especially, on the parts that require uncomfortable self-inspection
 
OP
B

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
("Pinch" and Bill, your unceasing efforts laid the groundwork for this, and your undying efforts assured there would be no vengeance for it, either. America cried out for vengeance the mornings after, you worked tirelessly to give us mumblypeg instead.)

"My generation’s bloody wake-up call
by Michelle Malkin
Creators Syndicate
Copyright 2011

September 11, 2001, 10:30 am EST. This day’s infamy is only just beginning to dawn as chaos fills the television screen, tears fill my eyes, and terror presses up into my throat. Both towers of the World Trade Center have collapsed completely. This is not a David Copperfield, made-for-TV magic trick. They’re gone forever — two steel-girded limbs brutally amputated from the New York City skyline by evil fanatics whom President Bush nervously referred to as “folks.”

“Folks” are my family and neighbors. Those who orchestrated this bloody attack are not “folks.” They are madmen. Monsters. Mass murderers. The president looked and sounded scared. And that scares me.

The phone pierces my solitary angst. From his office tower in Gaithersburg, Md., my husband says that he can see smoke clouds from the Pentagon where a plane has reportedly crashed. A friend who works for the Defense Department calls to say he’s okay.

He is mournful: “We let America down.” All the rest of us can do now is pray and wonder and wait.

And watch.

“It’s like a movie. It’s like it’s not really happening.” That’s the shell-shocked refrain I hear over and over again from young eyewitnesses on TV. As their panicked voices melt in the background, this tragedy brings one truth into sharp focus: Mine is a pampered generation that has spent its collective life with its feet on the coffee table, its ample rear end planted into the living room sofa, and its jaded fingers on a remote control."




Michelle Malkin » 10 years ago: My generation’s bloody wake-up call
 

ogibillm

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
14,029
Reaction score
1,618
Points
245
("Pinch" and Bill, your unceasing efforts laid the groundwork for this, and your undying efforts assured there would be no vengeance for it, either. America cried out for vengeance the mornings after, you worked tirelessly to give us mumblypeg instead.)
don't you understand that our desire for vengeance and an inflated sense of nationalism lead to exactly the types of things we should be ashamed of?

9/11 was used to drag us into iraq. why? there was no connection there. we would have and did do just about anything under the banner of 9/11. that some of those things were good doesn't diminish the lapse in judgement and character displayed through the bad.
 

Full-Auto

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2009
Messages
13,555
Reaction score
1,624
Points
153
(Sung to the refrain of "Just Prancing In The Conga Line")

"Posted on September 11, 2011 by Scott Johnson in Liberals

Krugmania strikes deep

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman writes on his New York Times blog:

Is it just me, or are the 9/11 commemorations oddly subdued?

Actually, I don’t think it’s me, and it’s not really that odd.

What happened after 9/11 — and I think even people on the right know this, whether they admit it or not — was deeply shameful. Te atrocity should have been a unifying event, but instead it became a wedge issue. Fake heroes like Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani, and, yes, George W. Bush raced to cash in on the horror. And then the attack was used to justify an unrelated war the neocons wanted to fight, for all the wrong reasons.

A lot of other people behaved badly. How many of our professional pundits — people who should have understood very well what was happening — took the easy way out, turning a blind eye to the corruption and lending their support to the hijacking of the atrocity?

The memory of 9/11 has been irrevocably poisoned; it has become an occasion for shame. And in its heart, the nation knows it.

I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons.

This does not appear to be the work of a Krugman impersonator."


Krugmania strikes deep | Power Line
 
OP
B

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
Let

NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE National Review Online

Mark Steyn

September 10, 2011 6:00 A.M.
Let’s Roll Over
We retreat to equivocation, cultural self-loathing, and utterly fraudulent misrepresentation of 9/11.

Waiting to be interviewed on the radio the other day, I found myself on hold listening to a public-service message exhorting listeners to go to 911day.org and tell their fellow citizens how they would be observing the tenth anniversary of the, ah, “tragic events.” There followed a sound bite of a lady explaining that she would be paying tribute by going and cleaning up an area of the beach.

Great! Who could object to that? Anything else? Well, another lady pledged that she “will continue to discuss anti-bullying tactics with my grandson.”

Marvelous. Because studies show that many middle-school bullies graduate to hijacking passenger jets and flying them into tall buildings?

Whoa, ease up on the old judgmentalism there, pal. In New Jersey, many of whose residents were among the dead, middle-schoolers will mark the anniversary with a special 9/11 curriculum that will “analyze diversity and prejudice in U.S. history.” And, if the “9/11 Peace Story Quilt” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art teaches us anything, it’s that the “tragic events” only underline the “importance of respect.” And “understanding.” As one of the quilt panels puts it:

You should never feel left out

You are a piece of a puzzle

And without you

The whole picture can’t be seen


And if that message of “healing and unity” doesn’t sum up what happened on Sept. 11, 2001, what does? A painting of a plane flying into a building? A sculpture of bodies falling from a skyscraper? Oh, don’t be so drearily literal. “It is still too soon,” says Midori Yashimoto, director of the New Jersey City University Visual Arts Gallery, whose exhibition “Afterwards & Forward” is intended to “promote dialogue, deeper reflection, meditation, and contextualization.” So, instead of planes and skyscrapers, it has Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree,” on which you can hang little tags with your ideas for world peace.

What’s missing from these commemorations?

Firemen?

Oh, please. There are some pieces of the puzzle we have to leave out. As Mayor Bloomberg’s office has patiently explained, there’s “not enough room” at the official Ground Zero commemoration to accommodate any firemen. “Which is kind of weird,” wrote the Canadian blogger Kathy Shaidle, “since 343 of them managed to fit into the exact same space ten years ago.” On a day when all the fancypants money-no-object federal acronyms comprehensively failed — CIA, FBI, FAA, INS — the only bit of government that worked was the low-level unglamorous municipal government represented by the Fire Department of New York. When they arrived at the World Trade Center the air was thick with falling bodies — ordinary men and women trapped on high floors above where the planes had hit, who chose to spend their last seconds in one last gulp of open air rather than die in an inferno of jet fuel. Far “too soon” for any of that at New Jersey City University, but perhaps you could reenact the moment by filling out a peace tag for Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree” and then letting it flutter to the ground.

Upon arrival at the foot of the towers, two firemen were hit by falling bodies. “There is no other way to put it,” one of their colleagues explained. “They exploded.”

Any room for that on the Metropolitan Museum’s “Peace Quilt”? Sadly not. We’re all out of squares"

http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/print/276803
 
Last edited:
OP
B

bitterlyclingin

Silver Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
3,116
Reaction score
423
Points
98
An acquaintance of mine who works in the cesspool that is DC intelligence reminded me some time ago that Washington is filled with people who would gladly and willingly sell out their nation if the net result would be to give their political party a one up on the other. Based on the evidence of the last ten years the veracity of that statement reached up to New York City and into the offices of the NYT. Eric Lichtblau and Mathew Riesen furiously aided Mr Sulzberger in the selling out of American during that period, Mr Krugman just adds icing to the cake today.They all should have been afforded accomodations in or near the suite provided Tokyo Rose.

Just an aside, you should never cut and paste, the authors should always receive the acknowledgement due.
 

Sallow

The Big Bad Wolf.
Joined
Oct 4, 2010
Messages
56,532
Reaction score
6,241
Points
1,840
Location
New York City
Criticizing these people is valid. I think the timing was bad form, however. This could have waited until tomorrow.
 

daveman

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
61,848
Reaction score
12,033
Points
2,180
Location
On the way to the Dark Tower.
You can be ashamed if you want. Don't presume to tell me I should be as well.

BC titled this thread correctly. Krugman, the Times, and now you are telling everyone how we should feel.
fine. if you're okay with allowing politicians to blatantly use a tragedy for their own ends that's okay with me. if you're fine with the american people, the press, and our elected officials not doing their duty and allowing us to go to war because we were caught up in hysteria that's fine.

and if you aren't ashamed of those things, if you are fine with them, what would you be ashamed of?

is there anything that we as a country could do that would embarass you?
I'm not playing your emotional little game.
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top