Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism

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Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
 

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Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
I have tried many times to show the prog slaves who visit this board the very message of the pilgrims, but their answer in their stupid way is....We just havent tried it this time....The progs in power can do it better.....
 

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Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
Thanksgiving had nothing to do with either.

What fruitcake post.
 

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First line under the title:

" By Kayleigh McEnany:"

:eusa_hand:
 

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
Thanksgiving had nothing to do with either.

What fruitcake post.

But you, as always, just swing your purse around in your high heels, as opposed to expressing an opinion and engaging in lively debate.


Yeah hun - your way will change things.
 

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America

I don't want communism

I don't want socialism

I don't want marxism

I don't want sharia law

I don't want fascism

I don't want a theocracy

I don't want a tyranny

I don't want an authoritarian dictatorship

I don't want your guns

I don't want to force you to eat quiche
or stop smoking tobacco
or chewing it
or drinking whiskey

I don't want to force you to speak spanish

I don't want to take away your religion

I just want decent AFFORDABLE healthcare
decent AFFORDABLE education
legalized pot
a secular government
laws based on logic and reason
and equal rights and protections for gays, atheists, muslims, hindus, midgets, african-Americans, minorities of all color and stripes.
 

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
I have tried many times to show the prog slaves who visit this board the very message of the pilgrims, but their answer in their stupid way is....We just havent tried it this time....The progs in power can do it better.....
Which Progs do you see in leadership that want communism?
 

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
I have tried many times to show the prog slaves who visit this board the very message of the pilgrims, but their answer in their stupid way is....We just havent tried it this time....The progs in power can do it better.....
Which Progs do you see in leadership that want communism?

in his brain?

EVERYONE who isn't wearing a "HE CAN GRAB MY PUSSY" t-shirt is a MARXIST.
 

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Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
I have tried many times to show the prog slaves who visit this board the very message of the pilgrims, but their answer in their stupid way is....We just havent tried it this time....The progs in power can do it better.....
Which Progs do you see in leadership that want communism?
 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
Thanksgiving had nothing to do with either.

What fruitcake post.
Way to deliberately miss the fucking point, jackass.

For the love of Sasquatch pussy, you fucking commie are so goddamn transparent and predictable. I can predict what you're going to say before you even fucking think to say it.
 

Mac1958

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georgephillip

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Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.
Corporate rule not communism dictated how land was allocated during the early settlement years:

The Right-Wing Myth That Thanksgiving Celebrates the Pilgrims’ Triumph Over Socialism

“Under the terms of the contract … for the first seven years no individual settler could own a plot of land.

"To ensure that each farmer received his fair share of good or bad land, the slices were rotated each year, but this was counterproductive.

"Nobody had any reason to put in extra hours and effort to improve a plot if next season another family received the benefit.”

"The pilgrims’ transition—which, again, happened after the first Thanksgiving—can indeed be used to illustrate the benefits of individualism or the tragedy of the commons.

"But the Rush Limbaugh crowd should note that the settlers at Plymouth were rebelling against the rules set by a corporation, not against the strictures of some Stalinist collective farm or a hippie commune."
 

danielpalos

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I have been a Realtor for over 45 years. We are forever on the front lines of defending Private Property Rights, the basis of our Freedom and Liberty.

Thanksgiving: The Story of America’s Experiment with Communism and Capitalism
By Kayleigh McEnany:
November 22, 2011 8:53 AM EST

We were all taught about the Pilgrims and Indians, but most of us do not know the real story of Thanksgiving -- the failure of communism and the triumph of capitalism.

Long before Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, and the days of Vladimir Lenin and Leon Trotsky, the Pilgrims conducted a communist experiment that exposed the system's downfalls and led them to communism's natural antithesis and the economic system we extol today -- capitalism. The incomplete narrative we were told growing up went something like this:

In 1620, the Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower and set sail for the New World. According to their leader, Plymouth Governor William Bradford, they found "cold barren desolate wilderness" upon their arrival in November. The Pilgrims endured a long, cold, and deadly winter during which half of them perished. When spring arrived, the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to cultivate the land, thereby saving the new settlers.

More often than not, this is where the account ends. But this is not the whole story of Thanksgiving -- far from it. This was just the beginning.

Even though the Indians did, indeed, teach the Pilgrims to farm, fish, and hunt in the spring of 1621, the Pilgrims did not yet prosper. It would be three long years before the Pilgrims could thank God for their plenty. The

Pilgrims had the instructional manual right in front of them. They knew what to do, but could not do it. Why did it take them years to turn theory into practice? What was the impediment to their success? In hindsight, the answer is clear.

As Paul Harvey would say, and now the rest of the story:

After encountering losses in Jamestown, investors were loath to fund voyages to the New World. Any subsidized expedition would be accompanied by strict and unfavorable stipulations. For the Pilgrims, the condition was that all the wealth that they accrued would be "common wealth."

At the end of seven years, the colonists were to split all of their wealth equally with their investors in London. There would be no private property, since this might incentivize the colonists to toil harder on their own land rather than the common land. So, from 1620 to 1622, Plymouth was essentially a commune with all land and profits owned by the community as a whole.

The result of this communal style of living was disastrous. Death, starvation and disease ensued. The Pilgrims were "languish[ing] in mystery" in the words of Bradford. Although Plymouth was filled with "godly and sober men," he said the community fell victim to sloth, laziness, and the refusal to work.

Why? For the same reason communism never works; it's the free-rider effect. The few who break their backs working watch the fruits of their labor go to the lazy or the free-riders who latch onto their coattails without doing any of the work themselves.

Bradford found a solution to the Pilgrims' woes:

"At length, after much debate of things, the Governor... gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves... And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number." In short, property was privatized, and the colonists experienced "very good success."

Bradford acknowledged the folly of their previous ways: "The experience that we had in this common course and condition tried sundry years... that by taking away property, and bringing community into a common wealth, would make them happy and flourishing -- as if they were wiser than God."

Realizing that communism was not the answer, that each man can only appreciate the things he earns, the Pilgrims continued to privatize more and more over the years. In doing so, they wrote not just the story of Thanksgiving, but also the story of America.


Another source about Jamestown
Private Property Saved Jamestown, And With It, America
They simply needed to elect a Commons Constable to ensure enough was produced.
 

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