Solar Trumps Milankovich...

flacaltenn

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Just putting this up as a bookmark.. New study identifying correlation of solar activity with the glacial (ice age) oscillations.. More sturdy than the bad match to Milankovitch cycles to explain how the Earth went thru MULTIPLE Ice Ages --- one right after another for nearly a million years...

THE HOCKEY SCHTICK: Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years

Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years
A paper published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters finds solar activity was strongly correlated to climate change over the past 200,000 years. The paper reconstructs solar geomagnetic field strength using the 10Be isotope proxy of cosmic rays, which is inversely related to solar activity. The reconstruction in Figure 2 shows solar activity at the end of the record ["near present day"] was at some of the highest levels of the past 200,000 years, and solar geomagnetic field intensity approximately 3 times higher than during the ice age ~180,000 years ago.

Figure 4 below shows the strong correlation between solar activity [grey and black] and the climate change proxy [d18O in red] over the past 200,000 years. According to the author, "The marine δ18O [temperature proxy] record and solar modulation are strongly correlated at the 100,000 year timescale. It is proposed that variations in solar activity control the 100,000 year glacial–interglacial cycles."

Thus, the paper appears to solve the mystery of what causes ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles, which has remained unsolved due to the so-called 100,000 year problem of using Milankovitch Cycles to explain ice ages. That is, ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles are primarily caused by changes in solar activity rather than solar insolation changes on the Northern and Southern Hemispheres as described by Milankovitch Cycles.

According to the author,
"the geomagnetic field intensity appears to have varied by a factor of three over the last 200,000 years, with three excursions when the intensity became less than half the present value."
"there are strong correlations between solar surface magnetic activity and climate at different timescales, which range from days through centuries. Whereas these observations have pointed to a causal relationship between solar activity and climate change, the details of of physical mechanism(s) still need to be worked out. It has been generally believed that the variations in solar magnetic activity lead to changes in total or ultraviolet irradiance of the Sun through the disc passage and evolution of sunspots and faculae, which, in turn, affects climate. Another posited mechanism through which solar activity could directly affect climate is via modulation of GCRs [Galactic Cosmic Rays], which induces cloud formation by inducing changes in the tropospheric ion production [Svensmark's theory]. If the changes in cosmic ray flux cause cloud cover variations, one would expect an inverse relationship between solar modulation and surface temperature, assuming that the proportion of low and high clouds remains constant. This is consistent with the observations in Figure 4 [below], although variations in irradiance could also affect climate by e.g. affecting ozone cover."
"In summary, it is evident that while there are strong correlations between solar activity and climate at different timescales, more work is needed towards finding mechanisms that change solar activity in the first place, and that explain the physical link between solar magnetism and climate." "The long term solar activity and the Earth's surface temperature appear to be directly related. The variations in solar activity may control the 100,000 year glacial-interglacial cycles providing a more tangible astronomical forcing than the estimated changes in solar insolation [Milankovitch Cycles] or cosmic dust accretion rates."
 
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flacaltenn

flacaltenn

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Bumped for all of those asserting that Milankovich Cycles are the primary driver of the glacial periods.
 

Kosh

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Just putting this up as a bookmark.. New study identifying correlation of solar activity with the glacial (ice age) oscillations.. More sturdy than the bad match to Milankovitch cycles to explain how the Earth went thru MULTIPLE Ice Ages --- one right after another for nearly a million years...
Except for the last 50 years which the AGW cultists claim belongs to humans.
 

Abraham3

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Just putting this up as a bookmark.. New study identifying correlation of solar activity with the glacial (ice age) oscillations.. More sturdy than the bad match to Milankovitch cycles to explain how the Earth went thru MULTIPLE Ice Ages --- one right after another for nearly a million years...

THE HOCKEY SCHTICK: Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years

Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years
A paper published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters finds solar activity was strongly correlated to climate change over the past 200,000 years. The paper reconstructs solar geomagnetic field strength using the 10Be isotope proxy of cosmic rays, which is inversely related to solar activity. The reconstruction in Figure 2 shows solar activity at the end of the record ["near present day"] was at some of the highest levels of the past 200,000 years, and solar geomagnetic field intensity approximately 3 times higher than during the ice age ~180,000 years ago.

Figure 4 below shows the strong correlation between solar activity [grey and black] and the climate change proxy [d18O in red] over the past 200,000 years. According to the author, "The marine δ18O [temperature proxy] record and solar modulation are strongly correlated at the 100,000 year timescale. It is proposed that variations in solar activity control the 100,000 year glacial–interglacial cycles."

Thus, the paper appears to solve the mystery of what causes ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles, which has remained unsolved due to the so-called 100,000 year problem of using Milankovitch Cycles to explain ice ages. That is, ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles are primarily caused by changes in solar activity rather than solar insolation changes on the Northern and Southern Hemispheres as described by Milankovitch Cycles.

According to the author,
"the geomagnetic field intensity appears to have varied by a factor of three over the last 200,000 years, with three excursions when the intensity became less than half the present value."
"there are strong correlations between solar surface magnetic activity and climate at different timescales, which range from days through centuries. Whereas these observations have pointed to a causal relationship between solar activity and climate change, the details of of physical mechanism(s) still need to be worked out. It has been generally believed that the variations in solar magnetic activity lead to changes in total or ultraviolet irradiance of the Sun through the disc passage and evolution of sunspots and faculae, which, in turn, affects climate. Another posited mechanism through which solar activity could directly affect climate is via modulation of GCRs [Galactic Cosmic Rays], which induces cloud formation by inducing changes in the tropospheric ion production [Svensmark's theory]. If the changes in cosmic ray flux cause cloud cover variations, one would expect an inverse relationship between solar modulation and surface temperature, assuming that the proportion of low and high clouds remains constant. This is consistent with the observations in Figure 4 [below], although variations in irradiance could also affect climate by e.g. affecting ozone cover."
"In summary, it is evident that while there are strong correlations between solar activity and climate at different timescales, more work is needed towards finding mechanisms that change solar activity in the first place, and that explain the physical link between solar magnetism and climate." "The long term solar activity and the Earth's surface temperature appear to be directly related. The variations in solar activity may control the 100,000 year glacial-interglacial cycles providing a more tangible astronomical forcing than the estimated changes in solar insolation [Milankovitch Cycles] or cosmic dust accretion rates."
All this addresses nothing but the 100,000 year cycle. Those are not the cycles you're looking for (looks up from speeder and waves hand vaguely).
 

SSDD

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Just putting this up as a bookmark.. New study identifying correlation of solar activity with the glacial (ice age) oscillations.. More sturdy than the bad match to Milankovitch cycles to explain how the Earth went thru MULTIPLE Ice Ages --- one right after another for nearly a million years...

THE HOCKEY SCHTICK: Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years

Paper finds solar activity explains climate change over past 200,000 years
A paper published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters finds solar activity was strongly correlated to climate change over the past 200,000 years. The paper reconstructs solar geomagnetic field strength using the 10Be isotope proxy of cosmic rays, which is inversely related to solar activity. The reconstruction in Figure 2 shows solar activity at the end of the record ["near present day"] was at some of the highest levels of the past 200,000 years, and solar geomagnetic field intensity approximately 3 times higher than during the ice age ~180,000 years ago.

Figure 4 below shows the strong correlation between solar activity [grey and black] and the climate change proxy [d18O in red] over the past 200,000 years. According to the author, "The marine δ18O [temperature proxy] record and solar modulation are strongly correlated at the 100,000 year timescale. It is proposed that variations in solar activity control the 100,000 year glacial–interglacial cycles."

Thus, the paper appears to solve the mystery of what causes ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles, which has remained unsolved due to the so-called 100,000 year problem of using Milankovitch Cycles to explain ice ages. That is, ice ages and glacial-interglacial cycles are primarily caused by changes in solar activity rather than solar insolation changes on the Northern and Southern Hemispheres as described by Milankovitch Cycles.

According to the author,
"the geomagnetic field intensity appears to have varied by a factor of three over the last 200,000 years, with three excursions when the intensity became less than half the present value."
"there are strong correlations between solar surface magnetic activity and climate at different timescales, which range from days through centuries. Whereas these observations have pointed to a causal relationship between solar activity and climate change, the details of of physical mechanism(s) still need to be worked out. It has been generally believed that the variations in solar magnetic activity lead to changes in total or ultraviolet irradiance of the Sun through the disc passage and evolution of sunspots and faculae, which, in turn, affects climate. Another posited mechanism through which solar activity could directly affect climate is via modulation of GCRs [Galactic Cosmic Rays], which induces cloud formation by inducing changes in the tropospheric ion production [Svensmark's theory]. If the changes in cosmic ray flux cause cloud cover variations, one would expect an inverse relationship between solar modulation and surface temperature, assuming that the proportion of low and high clouds remains constant. This is consistent with the observations in Figure 4 [below], although variations in irradiance could also affect climate by e.g. affecting ozone cover."
"In summary, it is evident that while there are strong correlations between solar activity and climate at different timescales, more work is needed towards finding mechanisms that change solar activity in the first place, and that explain the physical link between solar magnetism and climate." "The long term solar activity and the Earth's surface temperature appear to be directly related. The variations in solar activity may control the 100,000 year glacial-interglacial cycles providing a more tangible astronomical forcing than the estimated changes in solar insolation [Milankovitch Cycles] or cosmic dust accretion rates."
Yeah, I thought that one was interesting too since so many wackos (and they know who they are) have Milankovitch cycles indellibly etched into their brains like so much CAGW dogma.
 
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Abraham3

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By the way, this isn't a peer reviewed study, it's a letter.
 

SSDD

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By the way, this isn't a peer reviewed study, it's a letter.
The ignorance and stupidity just never ends with you, does it. It was a paper peer reviewed and published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Do you now want to claim that that journal only publishes letters?
 

Abraham3

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From the very top of their website's home page:

Earth and Planetary Science Letters

Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is the journal for researchers and practitioners from the broad Earth and planetary sciences community. It publishes concise, highly cited articles ("Letters") focusing on physical, chemical and mechanical processes as well as general properties of the Earth and planets - from their deep interiors to their atmospheres. Extensive data sets are included as electronic supplements and contribute to the short publication times. EPSL also includes a Frontiers section, featuring invited high-profile synthesis articles by leading experts to bring cutting-edge topics to the broader community.

Earth and Planetary Science Letters - Journal - Elsevier

OH YES! The ignorance and stupidity just never ends.
 
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SSDD

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From the very top of their website's home page:

Earth and Planetary Science Letters

Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is the journal for researchers and practitioners from the broad Earth and planetary sciences community. It publishes concise, highly cited articles ("Letters") focusing on physical, chemical and mechanical processes as well as general properties of the Earth and planets - from their deep interiors to their atmospheres. Extensive data sets are included as electronic supplements and contribute to the short publication times. EPSL also includes a Frontiers section, featuring invited high-profile synthesis articles by leading experts to bring cutting-edge topics to the broader community.

Earth and Planetary Science Letters - Journal - Elsevier

OH YES! The ignorance and stupidity just never ends.
Note letters in parentheses...ever hear the term man of letters? Probably a bit obscure for you , but damn....Stop talking guy....the more you talk, the deeper you dig.
 

Abraham3

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From the very top of their website's home page:

Earth and Planetary Science Letters

Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is the journal for researchers and practitioners from the broad Earth and planetary sciences community. It publishes concise, highly cited articles ("Letters") focusing on physical, chemical and mechanical processes as well as general properties of the Earth and planets - from their deep interiors to their atmospheres. Extensive data sets are included as electronic supplements and contribute to the short publication times. EPSL also includes a Frontiers section, featuring invited high-profile synthesis articles by leading experts to bring cutting-edge topics to the broader community.

Earth and Planetary Science Letters - Journal - Elsevier

OH YES! The ignorance and stupidity just never ends.
Note letters in parentheses...ever hear the term man of letters? Probably a bit obscure for you , but damn....Stop talking guy....the more you talk, the deeper you dig.
He whines from the bottom of his hole. I suggest you look up "man of letters" before you carry on with that one. It most certainly has nothing to do with this.

Note the highlight in red? Read that as "unreviewed".
 
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SSDD

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keep digging...maybe you will strike oil
 

SSDD

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From the very top of their website's home page:

Earth and Planetary Science Letters

Earth and Planetary Science Letters (EPSL) is the journal for researchers and practitioners from the broad Earth and planetary sciences community. It publishes concise, highly cited articles ("Letters") focusing on physical, chemical and mechanical processes as well as general properties of the Earth and planets - from their deep interiors to their atmospheres. Extensive data sets are included as electronic supplements and contribute to the short publication times. EPSL also includes a Frontiers section, featuring invited high-profile synthesis articles by leading experts to bring cutting-edge topics to the broader community.

Earth and Planetary Science Letters - Journal - Elsevier

OH YES! The ignorance and stupidity just never ends.
Note letters in parentheses...ever hear the term man of letters? Probably a bit obscure for you , but damn....Stop talking guy....the more you talk, the deeper you dig.
He whines from the bottom of his hole. I suggest you look up "man of letters" before you carry on with that one. It most certainly has nothing to do with this.

Note the highlight in red? Read that as "unreviewed".
HERE YOU FUCKING IDIOT....from the guide for authors...

http://www.elsevier.com/journals/earth-and-planetary-science-letters/0012-821X/guide-for-authors

Earth and Planetary Science Letters uses an online, electronic submission system. By accessing the website Elsevier Editorial SystemTM you will be guided stepwise through the creation and uploading of the various files. When submitting a manuscript to Elsevier Editorial System, authors need to provide an electronic version of their manuscript. The system automatically converts source files to a single Adobe Acrobat PDF version of the article, which is used in the peer-review process. Please note that even though manuscript source files are converted to PDF at submission for the review process, these source files are needed for further processing after acceptance.

You do this sort of shit all the time....if you had a clue, you would be to embarased to even show up here, much less try to talk in a science thread. Do you never tire of being made a fool of?
 
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Politico

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If you don't understand history and how the weather works you shouldn't be talking about it.
 

Abraham3

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Note letters in parentheses...ever hear the term man of letters? Probably a bit obscure for you , but damn....Stop talking guy....the more you talk, the deeper you dig.
He whines from the bottom of his hole. I suggest you look up "man of letters" before you carry on with that one. It most certainly has nothing to do with this.

Note the highlight in red? Read that as "unreviewed".
HERE YOU FUCKING IDIOT....from the guide for authors...

Guide for authors | Earth and Planetary Science Letters | 0012-821X | Elsevier

Earth and Planetary Science Letters uses an online, electronic submission system. By accessing the website Elsevier Editorial SystemTM you will be guided stepwise through the creation and uploading of the various files. When submitting a manuscript to Elsevier Editorial System, authors need to provide an electronic version of their manuscript. The system automatically converts source files to a single Adobe Acrobat PDF version of the article, which is used in the peer-review process. Please note that even though manuscript source files are converted to PDF at submission for the review process, these source files are needed for further processing after acceptance.

You do this sort of shit all the time....if you had a clue, you would be to embarased to even show up here, much less try to talk in a science thread. Do you never tire of being made a fool of?
Talking to you? Not in a million years.
 

SSDD

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He whines from the bottom of his hole. I suggest you look up "man of letters" before you carry on with that one. It most certainly has nothing to do with this.



Note the highlight in red? Read that as "unreviewed".


HERE YOU FUCKING IDIOT....from the guide for authors...



Guide for authors | Earth and Planetary Science Letters | 0012-821X | Elsevier



Earth and Planetary Science Letters uses an online, electronic submission system. By accessing the website Elsevier Editorial SystemTM you will be guided stepwise through the creation and uploading of the various files. When submitting a manuscript to Elsevier Editorial System, authors need to provide an electronic version of their manuscript. The system automatically converts source files to a single Adobe Acrobat PDF version of the article, which is used in the peer-review process. Please note that even though manuscript source files are converted to PDF at submission for the review process, these source files are needed for further processing after acceptance.



You do this sort of shit all the time....if you had a clue, you would be to embarased to even show up here, much less try to talk in a science thread. Do you never tire of being made a fool of?


Talking to you? Not in a million years.

All the time. Your profound ignorance keeps you from realizing. Your idiot claims of the earth being a closed system and papers in this particular journal not being peer reviewed are handy cases in point.
 

Old Rocks

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Hmmmmmmmmm................ So this 100,000 year solar cycle may or may not be a major contributor to glacial and interglacial periods. Strange it should line up so well with the 100,000 year cycle in the Milankovic Cycles. And, as the author correctly states, more study is needed.

However, since the contribution of GHGs to warming the atmosphere is proven beyond a reasonable doubt, if the sun is also contributing, then we are in double trouble.
 

SwimExpert

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Bumped for all of those asserting that Milankovich Cycles are the primary driver of the glacial periods.
Such a claim by global warming alarmists is always inherently fatal to their AGW claims. Since their entire position is based on a supposed ability to directly and causally tie CO2 levels to all changes in the planet's climate through history, there simply isn't any room for any other causal factor. Even though pegging Milankovich cycles as the cause of ice ages is flawed, their mere attempt to do so, regardless of whether there are match-up problems or not, directly contradicts their reasoning for their alarmism.
 

Old Rocks

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Bumped for all of those asserting that Milankovich Cycles are the primary driver of the glacial periods.
Such a claim by global warming alarmists is always inherently fatal to their AGW claims. Since their entire position is based on a supposed ability to directly and causally tie CO2 levels to all changes in the planet's climate through history, there simply isn't any room for any other causal factor. Even though pegging Milankovich cycles as the cause of ice ages is flawed, their mere attempt to do so, regardless of whether there are match-up problems or not, directly contradicts their reasoning for their alarmism.
Now why don't you just put that into scientific language, complete with your evidence? After all, that is how the Milankovic Cycles became accepted, as well as how the connection between GHG's and warming became accepted. Then present your theory to a large roomfull of scientists. :party:
 

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