CDZ Sex Education

phoenyx

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In the not too distant past, I created a thread titled Intergenerationality that actually dealt with 2 issues, Sex Education and Intergenerationality. After rewatching a video clip from John Oliver's Last Week Tonight, I've decided to simply focus on one of these issues, Sex Education. Here is John Oliver's clip:

My first question is: do you agree with the gist of John Oliver's argument on this?

My second question only applies to those who didn't respond to it in my Intergenerationality thread. The question is, what people think of the new Sex Ed program in schools in my province Ontario, Canada. For details on this program, please check out the following article:
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

Personally I believe they're both great steps in the right direction.
 

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works? Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
 
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phoenyx

phoenyx

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
 

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
 
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phoenyx

phoenyx

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
 

Pilate

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars? Really though, grade one seems unnecessarily early and this program seems a little too lengthy.
 
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phoenyx

phoenyx

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
 

Pilate

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Well, to be brief I'll answer your question with a question. Just how dumb are some teenagers to not understand how sex and sex related stuff works?
I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Anyway, I suppose the programs are a good idea and while perhaps distasteful, should be mandatory just because I've lost faith in anyone's ability to use common sense when engaging in intercourse.

I've literally heard of a guy who accidentally impregnated a girl because he thought he had "only peed inside of her."
Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
 

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phoenyx

phoenyx

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I wouldn't call it dumb, I would call it innocence. People of any age can only know what they are taught.

Oh my god that is funny :p. I mean, not for them, but, geez. Yeah, Sex Ed is badly needed in some places. Man -.-
Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
 

Pilate

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Something that I can't find in the article, or perhaps just hastily skimmed over, was the age group that would be receiving this sex-Ed course. Any idea how old they'd be?
Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
 
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phoenyx

phoenyx

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Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
 

Pilate

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They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
 
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phoenyx

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Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
I'm pretty sure sex ed generally isn't about "getting it on", laugh :p. It's about understanding how we reproduce, why, when to do it, and how to avoid doing it. I also think it'd be great if they could talk to teens about romantic relationships in general. There's so much more to them then whether or not to have sex.
 

Pilate

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I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
I'm pretty sure sex ed generally isn't about "getting it on", laugh :p. It's about understanding how we reproduce, why, when to do it, and how to avoid doing it. I also think it'd be great if they could talk to teens about romantic relationships in general. There's so much more to them then whether or not to have sex.
I don't think teaching kids about romance really is a public health issue. It would be crossing the line into "wasteful spending town" for me.
 
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phoenyx

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Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
I'm pretty sure sex ed generally isn't about "getting it on", laugh :p. It's about understanding how we reproduce, why, when to do it, and how to avoid doing it. I also think it'd be great if they could talk to teens about romantic relationships in general. There's so much more to them then whether or not to have sex.
I don't think teaching kids about romance really is a public health issue. It would be crossing the line into "wasteful spending town" for me.
Personally, I think it would be a very good thing for schools to highlight the positive aspects of sexual relationships, as well as to emphasize that relationships don't need to involve sex, especially at a young age. There is also the need to avoid what has been called "rape culture". Wikipedia introduces the term like this:
**In feminist theory, rape culture is a setting in which rape is pervasive and normalized due to societal attitudes about gender and sexuality.[1][2]The sociology of rape culture is studied academically by feminists. There is disagreement over what defines rape culture and as to whether any given societies meet the criteria to exhibit rape culture.[3]

Behaviors commonly associated with rape culture include victim blaming, sexual objectification, trivializing rape, denial of widespread rape, refusing to acknowledge the harm caused by some forms of sexual violence, or some combination of these.[4] The notion of rape culture has been used to describe and explain behavior within social groups, including prison rape, and in conflict areas where war rape is used aspsychological warfare. Entire societies have been alleged to be rape cultures.[3][5][6][7][8]

Evidence suggests that rape culture is correlated with other social factors and behaviors. Rape myths, victim blaming, and trivialization of rape have been found to be positively correlated with racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, classism, religious intolerance, and other forms ofdiscrimination.[9][10]
**

Source: Rape culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Something that I think most people would agree should be avoided before it begins in the younger generations...
 

Pilate

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"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
I'm pretty sure sex ed generally isn't about "getting it on", laugh :p. It's about understanding how we reproduce, why, when to do it, and how to avoid doing it. I also think it'd be great if they could talk to teens about romantic relationships in general. There's so much more to them then whether or not to have sex.
I don't think teaching kids about romance really is a public health issue. It would be crossing the line into "wasteful spending town" for me.
Personally, I think it would be a very good thing for schools to highlight the positive aspects of sexual relationships, as well as to emphasize that relationships don't need to involve sex, especially at a young age. There is also the need to avoid what has been called "rape culture". Wikipedia introduces the term like this:
**In feminist theory, rape culture is a setting in which rape is pervasive and normalized due to societal attitudes about gender and sexuality.[1][2]The sociology of rape culture is studied academically by feminists. There is disagreement over what defines rape culture and as to whether any given societies meet the criteria to exhibit rape culture.[3]

Behaviors commonly associated with rape culture include victim blaming, sexual objectification, trivializing rape, denial of widespread rape, refusing to acknowledge the harm caused by some forms of sexual violence, or some combination of these.[4] The notion of rape culture has been used to describe and explain behavior within social groups, including prison rape, and in conflict areas where war rape is used aspsychological warfare. Entire societies have been alleged to be rape cultures.[3][5][6][7][8]

Evidence suggests that rape culture is correlated with other social factors and behaviors. Rape myths, victim blaming, and trivialization of rape have been found to be positively correlated with racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, classism, religious intolerance, and other forms ofdiscrimination.[9][10]
**

Source: Rape culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Something that I think most people would agree should be avoided before it begins in the younger generations...
But rape is not pervasive nor normalized nor trees red lightly in any western country I can think of. If you don't believe me you can go out and try your hand at it. And the purpose of the class isn't really to highlight positives or to promote fringe groups' ideas, the purpose should merely be to improve the public's health and safety and drive down the costs associated with providing care for those who make poor decisions. Besides, you can't really teach love and all that jazz. Such a deep and powerful emotional concept is discovered on one's own.
 
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phoenyx

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I'm not so sure. I actually found it rather educational myself. Until I read this stuff and googled the words, I didn't know what a lot of the words meant myself :p. I think when I was still a young curious kid (ok, maybe I'm still kinda curious, but not nearly as much), I wanted to know all sorts of things, including how babies were made. I think my parents kind of told me a bit of how it worked, without really getting into details. I certainly never learned what the vas deferens was though :p. Seriously, I definitely think this stuff is more important then a king who kept on killing his wives, and the dates they were killed. I remember so many useless dates being crammed into our brains in history class, to be thankfully forgotten after the classes were done.
I dunno, I think the events are more important than the dates per-say. The dates are just thrown in so you can kinda file everything. But really, when was the last time you stopped yourself from getting it on because of "endometrium and cervix stuff." Maybe happened, but I doubt anyone called it that. After all, the back room of a club and a science lab are a world apart.
I'm pretty sure sex ed generally isn't about "getting it on", laugh :p. It's about understanding how we reproduce, why, when to do it, and how to avoid doing it. I also think it'd be great if they could talk to teens about romantic relationships in general. There's so much more to them then whether or not to have sex.
I don't think teaching kids about romance really is a public health issue. It would be crossing the line into "wasteful spending town" for me.
Personally, I think it would be a very good thing for schools to highlight the positive aspects of sexual relationships, as well as to emphasize that relationships don't need to involve sex, especially at a young age. There is also the need to avoid what has been called "rape culture". Wikipedia introduces the term like this:
**In feminist theory, rape culture is a setting in which rape is pervasive and normalized due to societal attitudes about gender and sexuality.[1][2]The sociology of rape culture is studied academically by feminists. There is disagreement over what defines rape culture and as to whether any given societies meet the criteria to exhibit rape culture.[3]

Behaviors commonly associated with rape culture include victim blaming, sexual objectification, trivializing rape, denial of widespread rape, refusing to acknowledge the harm caused by some forms of sexual violence, or some combination of these.[4] The notion of rape culture has been used to describe and explain behavior within social groups, including prison rape, and in conflict areas where war rape is used aspsychological warfare. Entire societies have been alleged to be rape cultures.[3][5][6][7][8]

Evidence suggests that rape culture is correlated with other social factors and behaviors. Rape myths, victim blaming, and trivialization of rape have been found to be positively correlated with racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, classism, religious intolerance, and other forms ofdiscrimination.[9][10]
**

Source: Rape culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Something that I think most people would agree should be avoided before it begins in the younger generations...
But rape is not pervasive nor normalized
That remains a matter of debate...
We Can't Admit America's Rape Culture Is As Pervasive As India's - The Establishment

nor trees red lightly in any western country I can think of.
That phrase doesn't make sense to me. Could you explain it?

If you don't believe me you can go out and try your hand at it.
What is it you think I don't believe and what is it I can try my hand at?

And the purpose of the class isn't really to highlight positives or to promote fringe groups' ideas, the purpose should merely be to improve the public's health and safety and drive down the costs associated with providing care for those who make poor decisions. Besides, you can't really teach love and all that jazz. Such a deep and powerful emotional concept is discovered on one's own.
To be honest, I think it'd make more sense to call sex ed sexual relationship education. The mechanics of human reproduction, while certainly interesting, is only a subset of a march larger subject, that of how people interact sexually with each other. Most people would agree that sexual interactions should be between 2 consenting individuals, but there are still those in the U.S. who don't even think that consent is always required, let alone enthusiastic consent, even within the legal profession. Take the following example...
Oklahoma court: oral sex is not rape if victim is unconscious from drinking
 

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Yes. I assume you're referring to this article, right?
New Sex Ed Ad Shows Curriculum Isn't Shying Away From Anything

It's in the article, the slideshow at the end. It starts at Grade 1 and ends at Grade 12, different lessons for each grade.
They need 12 years to teach a child what me and my friends figured out in maybe 2-3 with expertise coming after 5 years? What are they doing, training the next generation of porn stars?
Sigh -.- Why not check out the slide show and find out?
I had a look and much of it is stuff that you'll never realistically need to know.
Could you give me an example?
"In Grade 5, students will identify the parts of the reproductive system, and describe how the human body changes during puberty. They will expand their vocabulary with words like cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, endometrium, and clitoris, as well as scrotum, urethra, testicles, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens." -Slide 5

I can't really think of how this stuff is going to help students practice safe sex, I'm referring in particular to the vocab part.
Might help them when they go to the doctor though.
 

320 Years of History

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I wonder...
  • Do people who received lousy sex education actually realize that was the case? If so, how many?
  • Shouldn't there be some sort of certification requirement for sex? I mean really...Doctors, lawyers, CPAs, engineers, even hairdressers, along with a host of other professions require one to demonstrate they have some required level of understanding about the discipline before they are permitted to practice it.....just saying....nobody ever was irrevocably affected (or harmed) by a bad hairdo. [This is something of a tongue-in-cheek comment/question; however, its theme of the importance of young people's being well informed about sex and sexuality is not part of the satire.]



 

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