Kamala could be President for 10 years ?

Invisibleflash

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From another forum discussing if and when Kamala would take over for Biden due to health reasons if Biden won...


Kamala has incentive to wait until Biden has two years in place, then she could conceivably have up to ten years available for herself.

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Is that how it works?

2 years or less does not count as a term, so Kamala could run for 2 terms plus the half term?


Biden president Nano LR.jpg
 

kaz

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From another forum discussing if and when Kamala would take over for Biden due to health reasons if Biden won...


Kamala has incentive to wait until Biden has two years in place, then she could conceivably have up to ten years available for herself.

---------


Is that how it works?

2 years or less does not count as a term, so Kamala could run for 2 terms plus the half term?


View attachment 406955
It doesn't really matter. Until she takes over she'll just need to keep telling Joe, "Here, sign this." So why not just wait two years and she could theoretically have three terms?
 

WillHaftawaite

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Considering how she ranked with the public during the debates, even if she succeeds joe after 2 years, I don't see her getting elected as incumbent.
 

Faun

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From another forum discussing if and when Kamala would take over for Biden due to health reasons if Biden won...


Kamala has incentive to wait until Biden has two years in place, then she could conceivably have up to ten years available for herself.

---------


Is that how it works?

2 years or less does not count as a term, so Kamala could run for 2 terms plus the half term?


View attachment 406955
Yes, that's how it works...

Amendment XXII

No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once.
 

DrLove

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Nope - Best answer from Quora:


Al Danoli
Former Person Who Did Many Things before Retiring Early (1982-2018)
Updated October 31, 2019

The answer to your question depends on how long the term of office was that the VP finishes out. The Twenty-second Amendment says that no person can be elected President more than twice, and no person who has served more than two years of a presidential term to which someone else was elected (i.e., the president whom the vice-president succeeds) can be elected more than once.

Thus, Lyndon Johnson served out the approximately one year remaining in JFK’s first term when Kennedy was assassinated in 1963. Johnson was elected to his own full term in 1964, and was widely expected to run for a full second term in 1968; that’s why his decision to drop out of the race in March, 1968 created such shockwaves at the time.

His unpopularity because of the Vietnam War made it unlikely that Johnson would have been reelected in 1968, but given the way that delegates were chosen to the Democratic Convention, he probably would have gotten the 1968 nomination if he’d pursued it. Nevertheless, if Johnson had been elected in 1968, he would have been the first president since FDR (indeed, only the second in U.S. history) to serve more than 8 years in office.

Compare that with Gerald Ford, who became president in August, 1974, about 18 months into Richard Nixon’s second term. Ford served about two and-a-half years of Nixon’s remaining term. He ran, unsuccessfully, for his own full term in 1976. Had Ford been elected (and he came close), he would have been ineligible to run in 1980 or thereafter even though he would have formally been elected only once. (Ford remains the only person ever to become president without having been elected president or vice-president.)

Thus, Ford would have been the first president made ineligible by the Twenty-second Amendment to serve even eight years. He would have been constitutionally ineligible after serving only six and-a-half years, had his 1976 election come to pass.
 

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