It really was not that long ago...

IM2

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
 

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
He sounds like a drama queen. We all saw Roots and get it-maybe you should petition the networks to run it every black history month in place of these movies that glorify black gunslingers who never existed. You know, truth to fiction.
 
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IM2

IM2

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
He sounds like a drama queen. We all saw Roots and get it-maybe you should petition the networks to run it every black history month in place of these movies that glorify black gunslingers who never existed. You know, truth to fiction.
The truth is difficult for whites like you.
 

Third Party

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
He sounds like a drama queen. We all saw Roots and get it-maybe you should petition the networks to run it every black history month in place of these movies that glorify black gunslingers who never existed. You know, truth to fiction.
The truth is difficult for whites like you.
Please don't tell me that's your only answer-makes you sound dumb. First truth, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Second, you assume I'm white-and assumptions are dangerous. Lets just say you have no good answer for my post-there you are off the hook.
 

bigrebnc1775

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
 

Tommy Tainant

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
You echo the teachings of trump. Why dont you leave ?
 

bigrebnc1775

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
You echo the teachings of trump. Why dont you leave ?
So says the guy who has an Adolph mustache
What exactly did I say that was wrong Adolph? Are blacks in other countries doing better than those in America?
 

TNHarley

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Blacks had the govt treat them like complete shit. Yet, they vote to give the govt more power.
Blows my fucking mind.
 

TNHarley

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Blacks have it so bad here blah blah blah
Yet their own continent is riddled with crime, shitty living conditions and SLAVERY.
Lol
 

Vastator

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
You'd have to drag kicking, and screaming; %99 of Negros, from beneath the shade of white culture. In many cases they'd rather die...
 

bigrebnc1775

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
You'd have to drag kicking, and screaming; %99 of Negros, from beneath the shade of white culture. In many cases they'd rather die...
I know to many blacks who love this country to leave it
 

Third Party

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
If you hate living around white people so much why don't you leave? Why aren't you concerned with blacks in other countries? Why haven't they advanced?
You'd have to drag kicking, and screaming; %99 of Negros, from beneath the shade of white culture. In many cases they'd rather die...
Unfortunately, Katrina gave us that vision in New Orleans.
 

MizMolly

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
It was and is horrible for any human to be treated that way.
 

Third Party

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
It was and is horrible for any human to be treated that way.
And yet we favor illegal aliens over our own black American citizens and kids. Every dime going for tampons to the border should go to kids in Chicago and Detroit.
 

AveryJarhman

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
Hi, IM2. Regardless of whether or not some or ALL of the info shared in this story is true...

...how does this information relate to RACE RELATIONS in the 21st Century?

One other thing my friend. When writing or speaking about black American citizens, I really wish people would distinguish responsible, reasonably well-adjusted, FREE-THINKING black American citizens, from CHILD ABUSE, VIOLENCE & HATE promoting 'PRO BLACK' American citizens much like Pres. & Mrs. Obama.

IM2 Denounce Tariq Nasheed, Mechee X, Umar Johnson.jpg

Peace.
 

MikeK

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The truth is difficult for whites like you.
There are two truths -- yours and mine. You are Black. I'm White. My parents migrated from Germany to Brooklyn, New York, where and when slavery and Jim Crow segregation never existed. So how do you manage to rationalize the implications of this sentence: "Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive." How and why should I be held responsible for slavery?

Should you be held responsible for the daily multitude of brutal crimes perpetrated against perfectly innocent contemporary Whites by Blacks who will claim they are avenging the slavery era? Did all Whites own slaves? Did some Whites actively oppose slavery?
 

Third Party

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The truth is difficult for whites like you.
There are two truths -- yours and mine. You are Black. I'm White. My parents migrated from Germany to Brooklyn, New York, where and when slavery and Jim Crow segregation never existed. So how do you manage to rationalize the implications of this sentence: "Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive." How and why should I be held responsible for slavery?

Should you be held responsible for the daily multitude of brutal crimes perpetrated against perfectly innocent contemporary Whites by Blacks who will claim they are avenging the slavery era? Did all Whites own slaves? Did some Whites actively oppose slavery?
You forgot black on black crime-or is that the fault of whites also?
 

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You forgot black on black crime-or is that the fault of whites also?
Third Party; It is not at all uncommon to hear a Black speaker blame the phenomenon of Black-on-Black violence on Whites and then confidently set about to explain exactly how that works.
 

ptbw forever

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Here are excerpts of an article about a discussion with a black man born in 1925. He had relatives who were slaves. He lived during apartheid and he is living now. And he does not like what he sees.

For many, the connection to the enslaved is more than history. It’s family.
By Courtland Milloy
August 27 at 6:34 PM

My dad, who is 94, occupies his days touching up old family photos, doing research on the family tree and otherwise just taking life “one day at a time,” as he likes to say.

Dad was born in 1924, in rural Crittenden County, Ark. Sheriff’s deputies would arrest black men on trumped-up charges and hire them out to work in mines and in the fields. He saw a boy who had been accused of stealing a soda tied to a wagon and whipped by the sheriff while being dragged through the streets of the black community.

His father was a dentist. In 1935, sheriff’s deputies entered the dental office and shot him to death for defying a racial code that prohibited black businesses from having white customers. White people suffering from toothaches wanted whatever dentist they could find. And his dad was killed for not turning them away, for taking payment that, according to white supremacist ideology, should have gone to a white dentist.

Now, in this country, he was seeing the same kind of racism that led to the creation of a system of enslavement. Self-avowed white supremacists have marched through the streets of several American cities and towns. The president has made statements that many of us now agree are racist. Others have tried to argue that they shouldn’t be held responsible for slavery because they weren’t alive.

But many of us have been alive throughout its legacy of Jim Crow laws, redlining, segregated schools and unequal treatment in the legal system. For those like my dad, that connection to our enslaved beginning is all too close. And as we talked about these things, he had one conclusion:

“I’m glad I’m on the other end of the life spectrum,” Dad said, “because I don’t want to go through that again.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...e3477e-c8ec-11e9-a1fe-ca46e8d573c0_story.html
He sounds like a drama queen. We all saw Roots and get it-maybe you should petition the networks to run it every black history month in place of these movies that glorify black gunslingers who never existed. You know, truth to fiction.
Roots was a plagiarized fiction novel.
 

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