Independent candidate could decide the Senate?

EvilEyeFleegle

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Maine has some downright odd election rules--the voter can vote for more than 1 candidate..and rank them in order of preference! Which is to say, if the leading cancidate does not get 50%+ in the count..they count the 2nd place votes..if there are more..that's the winner!


Progressive independent Lisa Savage would be an obvious spoiler for a Democratic candidate in most races. But she vows her presence in Maine’s wild Senate contest won’t hurt Democrat Sara Gideon, and may even help.
Maine is crucial to Senate Republicans’ path to keeping their majority. And the race between GOP Sen. Susan Collins and Gideon, the Democratic state house speaker, could come down to the state’s unique voting system for federal races, which allows voters to select multiple candidates and rank them order of their preference. If no candidate clears a 50 percent threshold, then the race immediately tabulates voters’ second choices.
While Savage is unabashedly to the left of Gideon and supports big ideas like Medicare for All and a Green New Deal, she says the state’s ranked choice voting rules won’t undermine Gideon — even if she takes a significant chunk of the vote. Savage even claims to have tried to establish a pact with Democrats to ensure that Collins is gone on Nov. 3.

Savage, in an interview, said she approached the Gideon campaign with a proposal: both candidates would encourage their supporters, using the state’s atypical voting system, to rank the other as their second choice. She says the Gideon campaign declined to participate. And Savage is telling her supporters to rank Gideon second anyway, trying to block out the Republican senator.
 

whitehall

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Maine is strange in a lot of ways. You would naturally assume republican senator Susan Collins would support the nomination of a woman for Supreme Court, especially in a republican administration but she voted against Barrett. Apparently McConnell thought a "no" vote would help her in a tight senate race. I guess the strategy is to keep a technical republican majority in the senate even if a senator votes against key republican issues.
 

Oddball

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Maine is strange in a lot of ways. You would naturally assume republican senator Susan Collins would support the nomination of a woman for Supreme Court, especially in a republican administration but she voted against Barrett. Apparently McConnell thought a "no" vote would help her in a tight senate race. I guess the strategy is to keep a technical republican majority in the senate even if a senator votes against key republican issues.
Collins will lose because of this idiotic voting gadgetry.
 

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