Impacts of Arctic thaw

Old Rocks

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Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions

Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions

Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions
Key Points
The importance of atmospheric chemistry in response to permafrost emissions
Ivar S. A. Isaksen

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research–Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Michael Gauss

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo, Norway

Gunnar Myhre

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research–Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Katey M. Walter Anthony

Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering and International Arctic Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

Carolyn Ruppel

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA

The magnitude and feedbacks of future methane release from the Arctic region are unknown. Despite limited documentation of potential future releases associated with thawing permafrost and degassing methane hydrates, the large potential for future methane releases calls for improved understanding of the interaction of a changing climate with processes in the Arctic and chemical feedbacks in the atmosphere. Here we apply a “state of the art” atmospheric chemistry transport model to show that large emissions of CH 4 would likely have an unexpectedly large impact on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and on radiative forcing (RF). The indirect contribution to RF of additional methane emission is particularly important. It is shown that if global methane emissions were to increase by factors of 2.5 and 5.2 above current emissions, the indirect contributions to RF would be about 250% and 400%, respectively, of the RF that can be attributed to directly emitted methane alone. Assuming several hypothetical scenarios of CH 4 release associated with permafrost thaw, shallow marine hydrate degassing, and submarine landslides, we find a strong positive feedback on RF through atmospheric chemistry. In particular, the impact of CH 4 is enhanced through increase of its lifetime, and of atmospheric abundances of ozone, stratospheric water vapor, and CO 2 as a result of atmospheric chemical processes. Despite uncertainties in emission scenarios, our results provide a better understanding of the feedbacks in the atmospheric chemistry that would amplify climate warming.
 
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Fields of extensive methane outbursts found in Arctic region: Voice of Russia

Russian and American scientists have discovered new fields of intensive methane outbursts in the eastern part of the Arctic region. Some scientists believe that these outbursts may provoke stronger greenhouse effect.

The participants of an international expedition have fixed hundreds of torches-fountains of outgoing gas. This only a small part of what is hidden in permafrost, scientists say. On the bottom of the ocean methane is stored in hydrates - solid units, which began to fail at higher temperature emitting gas.
 
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Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information - Sponsored by OSTI

Atmosphere Earth and Energy Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
8
9
10
11 Abstract. Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial
12 oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the
13 coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic
14 sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution.
15 Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth
16 efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by
extra CH4 17 removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For
18 emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar
19 and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide
20 production are sufficient respectively to produce hypoxia and acidification in poorly
21 ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in
22 some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with
23 dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate
2
1 abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less
2 defined but may involve nutrient recycling, metal adsorption and anaerobic oxidizers.
 

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New normal finds Arctic melting faster...
:eusa_eh:
Federal report: Arctic much worse since 2006
1 Dec.`11 WASHINGTON – Federal officials say the Arctic region has changed dramatically in the past five years — for the worse.
It's melting at a near record pace, and it's darkening and absorbing too much of the sun's heat. A new report card from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration rates the polar region with blazing red stop lights on three of five categories and yellow cautions for the other two. Overall, these are not good grades, but it doesn't mean the Arctic is doomed and it still will freeze in the winter, said report co-editor Jackie Richter-Menge. The Arctic acts as Earth's refrigerator, cooling the planet. What's happening, scientists said, is like someone pushing the fridge's thermostat much too high. "It's not cooling as well as it used to," Richter-Menge said.

The dramatic changes are from both man-made global warming and recent localized weather shifts, which were on top of the longer term warming trend, scientists said. The report, written by 121 scientists from around the world, said statistics point to a shift in the Arctic health in 2006. That was right before 2007, when a mix of weather conditions and changing climate led to a record loss of sea ice, from which the region has never recovered. This summer's sea ice melt was the second worst on record, a tad behind 2007. "We've got a new normal," said co-author Don Perovich, a geophysicist at the Army Corps of Engineers Cold Research and Engineering Lab. "Whether it's a tipping point and we'll never recover, who's to say?"

The report highlighted statistics to show an Arctic undergoing change:

•A NASA satellite found that 430 billion metric tons of ice melted in Greenland from 2010 to 2011, and the melting is accelerating. Since 2000, Greenland's 39 widest glaciers shrunk by nearly 530 square miles, about the equivalent of 22 Manhattans.

•The past five years have had the five lowest summer sea ice levels on record. For two straight years, all three major passages through the Arctic have been open in the summer, which is unusual.

•Seven of 19 polar bear sub-populations are shrinking.

•This year's temperature is roughly 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit higher than what had been normal since 1980.

What's even more troubling to scientists is that there's been a record darkening of the normally white Arctic land and sea. White snow and ice reflects solar energy, but a melting darker Arctic in the summer absorbs that heat. Marco Tedesco of the City College of New York, a co-author, said the darkening is like a speeding train going downhill, adding to the acceleration of warming. Richter-Menge said the darkening of the Arctic from melting ice and snow "causes more heating, which causes more melting, and on the cycle goes." But there are some winners in the warming. The phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean, at the base of the marine food chain, has increased 20 percent compared with the past decade, and some plants are doing better, scientists said.

Source
 

waltky

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Uncle Ferd says it's pro'bly comin' from polar bear poop...
:eusa_shifty:
Massive methane gas bubbles in Arctic alarm scientists
Thursday 15th December, 2011 - Giant plumes of methane gas, some a kilometre in diameter, have been discovered bubbling to the surface of the Arctic Ocean by Russian scientists, alarming those trying to protect the region.
Scientists are concerned that as the Arctic Shelf recedes, the release of methane, the levels of which are unprecedented, could greatly accelerate global climate change. Methane gas is around 20 times more harmful to the environment and in terms of green house gasses than carbon dioxide.

In a roughly 10,000 square mile area, Igor Semiletov of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said his team found more than 100 "fountains, or torch-like structures, bubbling through the water column and injected directly into the atmosphere from the seabed".

Semiletov, speaking to the UK's Independent newspaper, said he believes there could be thousands of these methane fountains all around the Arctic region, extending from the Russian mainland to the East Siberian Arctic Shelf. "This is the first time that we've found continuous, powerful and impressive seeping structures, more than 1,000 metres in diameter. It's amazing," he said.

Semiletov added that the methane fountains were emitting directly into the atmosphere so that the "concentration was a hundred times higher than normal".

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
 

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
The area they are going to traverse is going to be frozen long before they get up there.. Its already 3-6 deg F below normal.. Another Ship of Fools moment in the making.... I hope they have their contingent of icebreakers because they are going to need them...
 

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Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions

Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions

Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions
Key Points
The importance of atmospheric chemistry in response to permafrost emissions
Ivar S. A. Isaksen

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research–Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Michael Gauss

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo, Norway

Gunnar Myhre

Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Center for International Climate and Environmental Research–Oslo, Oslo, Norway

Katey M. Walter Anthony

Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering and International Arctic Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA

Carolyn Ruppel

U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA

The magnitude and feedbacks of future methane release from the Arctic region are unknown. Despite limited documentation of potential future releases associated with thawing permafrost and degassing methane hydrates, the large potential for future methane releases calls for improved understanding of the interaction of a changing climate with processes in the Arctic and chemical feedbacks in the atmosphere. Here we apply a “state of the art” atmospheric chemistry transport model to show that large emissions of CH 4 would likely have an unexpectedly large impact on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and on radiative forcing (RF). The indirect contribution to RF of additional methane emission is particularly important. It is shown that if global methane emissions were to increase by factors of 2.5 and 5.2 above current emissions, the indirect contributions to RF would be about 250% and 400%, respectively, of the RF that can be attributed to directly emitted methane alone. Assuming several hypothetical scenarios of CH 4 release associated with permafrost thaw, shallow marine hydrate degassing, and submarine landslides, we find a strong positive feedback on RF through atmospheric chemistry. In particular, the impact of CH 4 is enhanced through increase of its lifetime, and of atmospheric abundances of ozone, stratospheric water vapor, and CO 2 as a result of atmospheric chemical processes. Despite uncertainties in emission scenarios, our results provide a better understanding of the feedbacks in the atmospheric chemistry that would amplify climate warming.
Several papers have all ready debunked many of their claims. The amount of methane is far less than they tout as possible to release. I will shred this paper in a few hours when I have time to read it and can deal with the ludicrous claims.
 

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
Typical hype !
....plans to send becomes "Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way"
A lot of ships headed there and few made it and then only in lanes opened by ice breakers...and none managed to duplicate what the St. Roch did in 1928 and the following years "Between 1928 and 1954, St. Roch logged tens of thousands of miles crossing and re-crossing the Arctic,"
Lets take a look what they are up against this year:
Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis | Sea ice data updated daily with one-day lag
The ice edge was relatively unchanged near Greenland and Svalbard, and in the East Siberian Sea. Much of the Northwest Passage through Canada remains choked with ice.
 

skookerasbil

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Swear to God, this guy has been talking about the "Arctic thaw" for 10 years in here! Year, after year after year......and what has changed in terms of peoples interest after 4 billion posts? Dick....nothing has changed. Its stupifying.....it'll be another 5 million posts before we even close out the year and the reaction of the public will be...

:bigbed::bigbed::bigbed::bigbed:
 

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
“CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft.” At least 22 vessels affected and several have turned back to Greenland, according to Daria Blackwell of oceancruiseclub.org.

Daria also posted this release from NORDREG CANADA, a branch of the Canadian Coast Guard.

Subject: 9H9573 – INFO – 08-18-1256 – LR – HEAVIER ICE CONDITIONS
Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2018 13:06:44 +0000
NORDREG IQALUIT 181256 UTC AUG 2018

Good morning,
Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent. CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft. Operators of pleasure craft considering a northwest passage should also consider the risk of having to winter in a safe haven in the Arctic, or in the case of an emergency, be evacuated from beset vessels. Safety of mariners is our primary concern.
REGARDS,
NORDREG CANADA
181256UTC\LR

To confirm that the “heavier than normal ice concentrations” statement was true, I checked Denmark’s Polar Portal site.



Turns out that as of today, 23 Aug 2018, Arctic sea-ice volume for this date is higher than the 2004-2013 average (thick black line vs thick grey line).

Arctic sea-ice volume is also higher for this date than in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

I have a sneaking suspicion that you won’t hear much about this from the mainstream media.

So much for Al Gore’s ice-free Arctic.
Old Crock will be soooooo disappointed....

Northwest Passage Icebound - Ice Age Now
 

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
“CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft.” At least 22 vessels affected and several have turned back to Greenland, according to Daria Blackwell of oceancruiseclub.org.

Daria also posted this release from NORDREG CANADA, a branch of the Canadian Coast Guard.

Subject: 9H9573 – INFO – 08-18-1256 – LR – HEAVIER ICE CONDITIONS
Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2018 13:06:44 +0000
NORDREG IQALUIT 181256 UTC AUG 2018

Good morning,
Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent. CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft. Operators of pleasure craft considering a northwest passage should also consider the risk of having to winter in a safe haven in the Arctic, or in the case of an emergency, be evacuated from beset vessels. Safety of mariners is our primary concern.
REGARDS,
NORDREG CANADA
181256UTC\LR

To confirm that the “heavier than normal ice concentrations” statement was true, I checked Denmark’s Polar Portal site.



Turns out that as of today, 23 Aug 2018, Arctic sea-ice volume for this date is higher than the 2004-2013 average (thick black line vs thick grey line).

Arctic sea-ice volume is also higher for this date than in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

I have a sneaking suspicion that you won’t hear much about this from the mainstream media.

So much for Al Gore’s ice-free Arctic.
Old Crock will be soooooo disappointed....

Northwest Passage Icebound - Ice Age Now
Nah he wont be upset....the next round of computer models will be out and he just gets all st00pid giddy. Old Rocks has been posting about a southern Pacific-like Arctic for 10 years in here! It's become like the yearly showing of The Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown! This climate change stuff is like the pumpkin patch for these meatheads! Provides skeptics with loads of opportunities to ridicule like with this thread! Then you can always look forward to the next year!!:backpedal:
 

Billy_Bob

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World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way...

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way



August 22, 2018 - Maersk, the world's largest container line, is about to test the frigid waters of the Arctic in a trial of shorter shipping lanes that could become viable as warmer temperatures open up the Northern Sea Route.

On or around Sept. 1, Denmark-based Maersk plans to send its first container ship through the Arctic to explore whether the once inhospitable route could become feasible in the future. Many analysts see the test as a turning point for both the shipping industry and the Arctic. Over the past decade, as Earth has warmed, global shipping companies have increasingly eyed the Arctic as a way to cut precious — and expensive — travel time. Some shipping companies, including Maersk's main rival, China-based Cosco, are already plying Arctic waters carrying heavy equipment, such as wind turbines. However, conditions have been seen as too harsh and unpredictable for massive shipping containers. Now Maersk is going to give it a try with what it says is a one-off voyage. It is sending the Venta Maersk — a new ship with a reinforced hull and a capacity of 3,600 containers — into the polar sea.


Malte Humpert, the founder and senior fellow of the Arctic Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, says Maersk's decision signals the next step in the development of Arctic shipping. "It's not a major, dramatic shift, it's just a kind of sequential development," he Humpert says. "The ice is melting and more things are becoming possible in the Arctic, and with that, of course, ... comes enhanced risk for the environment." In a statement to NPR, Maersk says it does "not see the Northern Sea Route as an alternative to our usual routes. We plan new services according to our customers' demand, trading patterns and population centers." The company says it is dispatching Venta Maersk in the Arctic on "a trial to explore an unknown route for container shipping and to collect scientific data."


An aerial view of the Yevgeny Primakov icebreaker on the ice-covered Neva River in St. Petersburg, Russia. Maersk, the world's largest shipping line, is testing a Vladivostok to St. Petersburg route through the Arctic.​

Humpert says Maersk wants to gain some experience in the Arctic, which will likely open up more possibilities in the future. He says the Northern Sea Route could slice about two weeks off the journey from Asia to Europe. Venta Maersk is expected to travel from Vladivostok, in Russia's Far East, to the Baltic seaport of St. Petersburg. Even so, cutting travel time does not guarantee cost savings. Humpert says there is no infrastructure in the Arctic, and unlike the traditional Vladivostok-to-St. Petersburg route through the Suez Canal, there are no transshipment options along the way. "The only way to make a giant ship with ... containers work is if you have a dozen or so ports along the way where you offload a thousand containers and you take on another thousand containers," he says. "That's kind of how global shipping works."

Paul Bingham, a transportation and international trade economist with the Economical Development Research group, says Venta Maersk is an "ice-class vessel," capable of going through about 3 feet of unconsolidated ice. He says that makes the ship strong enough to withstand the rigors of the route, but only for about three months of the year. "For many of these routes, for some portion of the year for certain vessels, they would require quite expensive Russian icebreaker escort in front of their vessel," Bingham says. That, he says, would make it certainly much more limited in terms of attractiveness to a lot of shippers." Bingham says Maersk will likely look at a number of metrics, such as speed, fuel consumption and how maneuverable the vessel is in the ice. "They'll be measuring air temperature and wind speed ... probably even be monitoring the crew in terms of their performance for when they have to be out on deck for whatever reason in the exposed air," he says. Bingham says Maersk will likely also be measuring how the cargo fares on the cold journey. But that shouldn't be much of a worry — the Venta Maersk will be carrying mainly frozen fish on its maiden voyage to the Arctic.

World's Largest Shipping Company Heads Into Arctic As Global Warming Opens The Way
“CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft.” At least 22 vessels affected and several have turned back to Greenland, according to Daria Blackwell of oceancruiseclub.org.

Daria also posted this release from NORDREG CANADA, a branch of the Canadian Coast Guard.

Subject: 9H9573 – INFO – 08-18-1256 – LR – HEAVIER ICE CONDITIONS
Date: Sat, 18 Aug 2018 13:06:44 +0000
NORDREG IQALUIT 181256 UTC AUG 2018

Good morning,
Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent. CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft. Operators of pleasure craft considering a northwest passage should also consider the risk of having to winter in a safe haven in the Arctic, or in the case of an emergency, be evacuated from beset vessels. Safety of mariners is our primary concern.
REGARDS,
NORDREG CANADA
181256UTC\LR

To confirm that the “heavier than normal ice concentrations” statement was true, I checked Denmark’s Polar Portal site.



Turns out that as of today, 23 Aug 2018, Arctic sea-ice volume for this date is higher than the 2004-2013 average (thick black line vs thick grey line).

Arctic sea-ice volume is also higher for this date than in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

I have a sneaking suspicion that you won’t hear much about this from the mainstream media.

So much for Al Gore’s ice-free Arctic.
Old Crock will be soooooo disappointed....

Northwest Passage Icebound - Ice Age Now
Nah he wont be upset....the next round of computer models will be out and he just gets all st00pid giddy. Old Rocks has been posting about a southern Pacific-like Arctic for 10 years in here! It's become like the yearly showing of The Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown! This climate change stuff is like the pumpkin patch for these meatheads! Provides skeptics with loads of opportunities to ridicule like with this thread! Then you can always look forward to the next year!!:backpedal:

Well... sea ice increase has already begun in most regions and did so three weeks ago. Silly me, looking at empirical evidence and believing it...
 

mamooth

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Well... sea ice increase has already begun in most regions and did so three weeks ago. Silly me, looking at empirical evidence and believing it...
No, sea ice levels are still dropping, and will continue for the next few weeks. You faked that claim, same way as you fake everything. That's why everyone now correctly assumes anything you say is fraudulent.



It is correct that the NW passage won't be open this year. The central CAA (Canadian Arctic Archipelago) passage is blocked, and the small craft that were trying to run the NW passage are turning around and leaving the Arctic.The heat has been on the Russian side and the high Arctic, will the CAA being cooler. Plus, the unusually mobile and fractured ice in the high Arctic has come pouring through the Parry Channel and into the CAA this year, replacing the ice that melted out. Each year brings something different, but the trend is inexorably down.

So we've still been right about every single thing, while deniers still maintain their perfect failure record.

 

skookerasbil

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Note the fakery s0ns......post above.

"trending down"

"Heat"

"dropping"

Semantic gheyness used by every climate crusader nutter these days in every post....purposefully so. Terms that never answer the question, "As compared to what?"

"Trending down" conveys doom....until you take a gander at the previous #'s. Statistical fakery with loose terms is ghey.

I can take my Mustang to the track and return and tell everybody, "I was alot faster!". But I only pick up 2 tenths and trapped at 116. Fake.....but "faster" sure sounds impressive! The dim fail to ask the question, "What did you run last time out?"

Progressives pull these faggy stunts all the time.:113::113:
 

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