Hungary overrun by Migrants fleeing Syria

waltky

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Migrants are a pest in Budapest...

Chaos in Budapest train station amid Europe's migrant crisis
Sep 1,`15 -- Chanting "Freedom! Freedom!," angry migrants demanded to be let aboard trains bound for Austria and Germany after Hungary temporarily suspended all rail traffic Tuesday from its main Budapest terminal and brawny police forced hundreds of migrants out of the train station.
Chaos enveloped the city's Keleti station. Forced into the midday sun, scores of migrants protested for hours, waving newly purchased train tickets angrily in the air. The official U-turn surprised observers, given that Hungary over the weekend had started to allow migrants to travel by train to the west without going through asylum procedures. Janos Lazar, chief of staff to Prime Minister Viktor Orban, told lawmakers that Hungary disagreed with Germany's openness to taking refugees from war-torn Syria. He blamed Germany and what he called other "left-wing governments" in Europe for encouraging the rush of migrants that has staggered Hungary both on its borders at in its capital city. "The defense of our borders is important, not opening the borders," he said.

But human rights watchdogs called Hungary's actions incoherent and indefensible. They said Hungary's open residential centers for asylum seekers already were too overcrowded to cope, and blocking migrants from using cross-border public transport forces them to cross the border dangerously hidden in smugglers' vehicles. Hungary rail shutdown came less than a week after Austrian police found 71 migrants dead in a smuggler's abandoned truck, the apparent victims of suffocation. "If you deny them - although they have a paid ticket - and you don't let them get on board, you push them right into the hands of smugglers," William Lacy Swing, director general of the International Organization for Migration, told The Associated Press. "So they get into vans and into trucks and they die."


Migrants demonstrate at the Keleti Railway Station in Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, Sept.1, 2015, after the police stopped them from getting on a train to Germany and evacuated the station.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel rejected Hungary's criticism of German asylum policy, saying her country was offering the same welcome to people fleeing war in Syria that all members of the 28-nation EU, including Hungary, should provide. Speaking in Berlin, Merkel said Germany shouldn't be expected to take the lion's share of Syrian refugees and appealed to EU partners to volunteer to take more. Germany expects to take in 800,000 asylum seekers this year, compared to under 3,000 for fellow EU member Spain. Merkel said Germany typically did give refugee protection to Syrian citizens fleeing the country's 4-year-old war. "That should come as no surprise. Actually, it should be the same in every European country," she said.

European nations say more than 332,000 migrants have arrived already this year. The front-line border nations of Greece, Italy and Hungary as well as non-EU members Serbia and Macedonia have been overwhelmed by the thousands surging across their border. More than 2,600 migrants have also drowned this year as they cross the Mediterranean in smugglers' often-unseaworthy boats. Scuffles broke out Tuesday morning at Budapest's Keleti station as hundreds of migrants pushed toward the metal gates where a train was scheduled to leave for Vienna and Munich, only to be blocked by police. Authorities announced over loudspeakers that all trains would be stopped indefinitely from leaving. Migrants' papers were checked, and those with train tickets but no EU visas were ushered out of the station. Outside, hundreds who had spent heavily on the tickets chanted "Germany!" and "U.N.!" But Hungary's national rail company, Mav, said it no longer would sell train tickets to customers who could not present proper ID and, where required, visas. It said customers would be allowed to buy only tickets for themselves, not multiple purchases.

MORE
See also:

Hungary halts rail traffic in bid to stop migrants
September 1,`15 — Overwhelmed by thousands of asylum-seekers, Hungarian authorities Tuesday briefly halted rail traffic from their nation’s main train station, the latest blow to borderless movement in Europe.[/b]
The abolition of border controls between European Union nations has been a central pillar of European leaders’ dreams of stitching together a continent of common values and interconnected economies. But in just weeks, the mounting migration crisis has begun to erode a system that took decades to build. Hungarian authorities shuttered Budapest’s grand fin-de-siecle train station for hours on Tuesday morning, stopping rail traffic for all passengers while they worked to clear crowds of hundreds of migrants who had gathered at the station in recent days.

The asylum-seekers, many of whom are fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, hope to make it onward to Germany, which has promised shelter and sustenance for Syrians. By midday in Budapest, the train station had been reopened, but migrants were being kept away, Hungary’s state-owned news agency reported. Austria has also significantly increased inspections of vehicles crossing the border from Hungary since Sunday, causing backups of trucks that stretched for miles, another sign of the fast-mounting barriers between nations that years ago closed their border checkpoints. Authorities on Monday had allowed thousands of migrants to board trains to Austria, prompting complaints from Austrian leaders. “Just allowing them to board in Budapest . . . and watching as they are taken to your neighbor, that’s not politics,” said Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann in an interview late Monday with the ORF broadcaster.



There are no signs the crisis is abating. Greece’s coast guard said Tuesday that it had rescued 1,192 migrants and refugees from Monday to Tuesday near eastern Greek islands that are close to the Turkish coast. That was a significantly higher figure than in recent weeks. From Greece, migrants try to move northward through the Balkans, to Hungary and onward to Western Europe. Appeals to take in desperate asylum-seekers have run into skepticism that swift changes would actually take place. In a news conference Tuesday alongside Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that the two leaders had agreed that a common European solution to the refugee crisis was needed.

She reiterated her call that even as genuine refugees should be granted asylum, economic migrants should be weeded out. She said the European Commission should define “safe countries of origin,” adding that registration centers should be established in Italy and Spain so that those migrants who do not have an honest legal claim to asylum could be returned to their countries more quickly. Those who do have genuine claims, she said, should then be more distributed more fairly within Europe. Germany is taking the lion’s share of refugees — an estimated 800,000 this year alone. Rajoy called the refugee question “the biggest challenge for Europe in the coming years.”

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waltky

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Migrants dying to get into Europe...

'Mediterranean turning into graveyard of migrants’
Sep 4, 2015: Turkey's President Recep Erdogan said on Thursday that migrants were dying while attempting to sneak into Europe because the latter would not accept them legally. "The Mediterranean is turning into a graveyard of migrants," Erdogan told the select top global business leaders at the G-20 meeting.
Turkey's state-owned Anadolu news agency said apart from three-year-old Aylan, whose picture lying face down on a beach has sparked an international outrage, at least 12 more refugees fleeing the war in Syria, including two young boys, had drowned while trying to reach the Greek island of Kos from Bodrum. The mass migration in Europe has already surpassed the levels of World War-II with migrants flee unending wars: of President Assad's retaliation against rebels in Syria, of IS expanding its bloodied footprints in Iraq and the Taliban in Afghanistan. The refugee influx began four years ago, but has turned deathly in recent weeks with increasing European resistance, evident from long queues at the gates of Hungary, Greece, Macedonia and other central-east European countries.

The numbers are staggering. Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon have taken in four million refugees since 2011 when the flow started. Turkey says it has spent $6.5 billion on refugees with its "open door" policy. Now, as these countries are saturated and governments begin to put Syrians in refugee camps, the latter are turning to Europe in greater numbers, lured by claims of "human traffickers" promising automatic refugee status and welfare in prosperous Europe, just across the sea.

Unscrupulous people milking misery to make millions are pushing migrants in rubber dinghies towards Europe. These boats are capsizing, turning into floating coffins, like that of toddler Kurdi. The anger is palpable across the Turkey establishment. The country alone has taken two million refugees compared to 200,000 by Europe over four years. And now, as Erdogan said sarcastically, 28 countries are discussing how to distribute 28,000 refugees among themselves.

European is witnessing a rise of far xenophobic rightwing groups, instigating fears of locals and outsiders who take up their jobs. Certainly thrown in is the scare of race and religion: Muslims coming to Christian Europe. The rise of the rightwing seems to have forced mainstream European political parties to adopt their agenda to check them, be it Greece, France, Hungary, even Germany. An official said that Slovakia could not take in Syrians because it does not have mosques for prayers. General estimate suggest the crisis may not abate any time soon. The desperate, fleeced by traffickers, men, women and children would continue to take rubber boats across the seas to reach Europe. And if Europe doesn't open up, they may continue to face death by water.

'Mediterranean turning into graveyard of migrants’ - The Times of India
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Finally, one death makes world weep for migrants
Sep 4, 2015: As mortifying images of the lifeless body of three-year-old Aylan Kurdi at the Turkish beach resort of Bordum went viral on Thursday, a furious Turkey President Recep Erdogan, hosting the G-20 meet of global business leaders, broke from summitteering to say Europe and "the rest of humanity" must bear the blame for the tiny child's death.
Joining Erdogan in critiquing the international response to the burgeoning humanitarian crisis of war refugees trying to enter Europe in tens of thousands per day, was Germany's labour minister Andrea. She said, "The failure to handle the migrant crisis effectively could adversely affect the idea of Europe," and called for a fair distribution of refugees within the European Union. Nahles warned that Europe had "come to a crossroads", and that poor handling of asylum seekers Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, even North Africa and Pakistan, was fueling anger and skepticism towards the EU. Erdogan said migrants are dying while attempting to sneak into Europe because the latter would not accept them legally. "The Mediterranean is turning into a graveyard of migrants," Erdogan told the select top global business leaders at the B20 meeting Thursday evening.

Turkey's state-owned Anadolu news agency said apart from Aylan, at least 12 more refugees fleeing the war in Syria, including two young boys, had drowned while trying to reach the Greek island of Kos from Bodrum. The mass migration in Europe has already surpassed the levels of World War-II with migrants flee unending wars: of President Assad's retaliation against rebels in Syria, of IS expanding its bloodied footprints in Iraq and the Taliban in Afghanistan.

The refugee influx began four years ago, but has turned deathly in recent weeks with increasing European resistance, evident from long queues at the gates of Hungary, Greece, Macedonia and other central-east European countries. The numbers are staggering. Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon have taken in four million refugees since 2011 when the flow started. Turkey says it has spent $6.5 billion on refugees with its "open door" policy. Now, as these countries are saturated and governments begin to put Syrians in refugee camps, the latter are turning to Europe in greater numbers, lured by claims of "human traffickers" promising automatic refugee status and welfare in prosperous Europe, just across the sea.

Finally, one death makes world weep for migrants - The Times of India
 

Katzndogz

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Europe should never have let the first invader in. Stop it at the beginning. It will be much harder now.
 

pismoe

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same goes for the USA , sounds like the USA is going to get 65,000 'syrians' Tipsy !!
 

pismoe

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just some backup of what I said about the USA getting 65, 000 muslims from 'syria' . --- US Boosts Efforts to Help Syrian Refugees --- and calls are for more . 'Lutherans' want more , number I've seen is 200,000 and both calls are for 2016 .
 

Maggdy

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Migrants are a pest in Budapest...

Chaos in Budapest train station amid Europe's migrant crisis
Sep 1,`15 -- Chanting "Freedom! Freedom!," angry migrants demanded to be let aboard trains bound for Austria and Germany after Hungary temporarily suspended all rail traffic Tuesday from its main Budapest terminal and brawny police forced hundreds of migrants out of the train station.
Chaos enveloped the city's Keleti station. Forced into the midday sun, scores of migrants protested for hours, waving newly purchased train tickets angrily in the air. The official U-turn surprised observers, given that Hungary over the weekend had started to allow migrants to travel by train to the west without going through asylum procedures. Janos Lazar, chief of staff to Prime Minister Viktor Orban, told lawmakers that Hungary disagreed with Germany's openness to taking refugees from war-torn Syria. He blamed Germany and what he called other "left-wing governments" in Europe for encouraging the rush of migrants that has staggered Hungary both on its borders at in its capital city. "The defense of our borders is important, not opening the borders," he said.

But human rights watchdogs called Hungary's actions incoherent and indefensible. They said Hungary's open residential centers for asylum seekers already were too overcrowded to cope, and blocking migrants from using cross-border public transport forces them to cross the border dangerously hidden in smugglers' vehicles. Hungary rail shutdown came less than a week after Austrian police found 71 migrants dead in a smuggler's abandoned truck, the apparent victims of suffocation. "If you deny them - although they have a paid ticket - and you don't let them get on board, you push them right into the hands of smugglers," William Lacy Swing, director general of the International Organization for Migration, told The Associated Press. "So they get into vans and into trucks and they die."


Migrants demonstrate at the Keleti Railway Station in Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, Sept.1, 2015, after the police stopped them from getting on a train to Germany and evacuated the station.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel rejected Hungary's criticism of German asylum policy, saying her country was offering the same welcome to people fleeing war in Syria that all members of the 28-nation EU, including Hungary, should provide. Speaking in Berlin, Merkel said Germany shouldn't be expected to take the lion's share of Syrian refugees and appealed to EU partners to volunteer to take more. Germany expects to take in 800,000 asylum seekers this year, compared to under 3,000 for fellow EU member Spain. Merkel said Germany typically did give refugee protection to Syrian citizens fleeing the country's 4-year-old war. "That should come as no surprise. Actually, it should be the same in every European country," she said.

European nations say more than 332,000 migrants have arrived already this year. The front-line border nations of Greece, Italy and Hungary as well as non-EU members Serbia and Macedonia have been overwhelmed by the thousands surging across their border. More than 2,600 migrants have also drowned this year as they cross the Mediterranean in smugglers' often-unseaworthy boats. Scuffles broke out Tuesday morning at Budapest's Keleti station as hundreds of migrants pushed toward the metal gates where a train was scheduled to leave for Vienna and Munich, only to be blocked by police. Authorities announced over loudspeakers that all trains would be stopped indefinitely from leaving. Migrants' papers were checked, and those with train tickets but no EU visas were ushered out of the station. Outside, hundreds who had spent heavily on the tickets chanted "Germany!" and "U.N.!" But Hungary's national rail company, Mav, said it no longer would sell train tickets to customers who could not present proper ID and, where required, visas. It said customers would be allowed to buy only tickets for themselves, not multiple purchases.

MORE
See also:

Hungary halts rail traffic in bid to stop migrants
September 1,`15 — Overwhelmed by thousands of asylum-seekers, Hungarian authorities Tuesday briefly halted rail traffic from their nation’s main train station, the latest blow to borderless movement in Europe.[/b]
The abolition of border controls between European Union nations has been a central pillar of European leaders’ dreams of stitching together a continent of common values and interconnected economies. But in just weeks, the mounting migration crisis has begun to erode a system that took decades to build. Hungarian authorities shuttered Budapest’s grand fin-de-siecle train station for hours on Tuesday morning, stopping rail traffic for all passengers while they worked to clear crowds of hundreds of migrants who had gathered at the station in recent days.

The asylum-seekers, many of whom are fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, hope to make it onward to Germany, which has promised shelter and sustenance for Syrians. By midday in Budapest, the train station had been reopened, but migrants were being kept away, Hungary’s state-owned news agency reported. Austria has also significantly increased inspections of vehicles crossing the border from Hungary since Sunday, causing backups of trucks that stretched for miles, another sign of the fast-mounting barriers between nations that years ago closed their border checkpoints. Authorities on Monday had allowed thousands of migrants to board trains to Austria, prompting complaints from Austrian leaders. “Just allowing them to board in Budapest . . . and watching as they are taken to your neighbor, that’s not politics,” said Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann in an interview late Monday with the ORF broadcaster.



There are no signs the crisis is abating. Greece’s coast guard said Tuesday that it had rescued 1,192 migrants and refugees from Monday to Tuesday near eastern Greek islands that are close to the Turkish coast. That was a significantly higher figure than in recent weeks. From Greece, migrants try to move northward through the Balkans, to Hungary and onward to Western Europe. Appeals to take in desperate asylum-seekers have run into skepticism that swift changes would actually take place. In a news conference Tuesday alongside Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that the two leaders had agreed that a common European solution to the refugee crisis was needed.

She reiterated her call that even as genuine refugees should be granted asylum, economic migrants should be weeded out. She said the European Commission should define “safe countries of origin,” adding that registration centers should be established in Italy and Spain so that those migrants who do not have an honest legal claim to asylum could be returned to their countries more quickly. Those who do have genuine claims, she said, should then be more distributed more fairly within Europe. Germany is taking the lion’s share of refugees — an estimated 800,000 this year alone. Rajoy called the refugee question “the biggest challenge for Europe in the coming years.”

MORE
I'm sorry, I did not find English-language article now, but I try my own words to interpret the current situation:
The migrants, set off on foot from Budapest to Austria. They not accept food and drink.
According to the promise of tomorrow will come from Austria convoy to rescue the refugees. The convoy: organize they the civil citizens.
https://m.facebook.com/events/1615305105404161/

The immigrants began to walk yesterday morning. In waves, again and again and again the hundreds of people marching on the M1 highway.

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9k=.jpg
 
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waltky

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Refugees welcomed with candy & toys...

CANDY AND CUDDLY TOYS: MIGRANTS FINISH EPIC TREK TO GERMANY
Sep 5,`15 -- For weeks while they traveled a punitive road, Europe cast a cold and callous eye on their unwelcome progress. On Saturday, for the first time since fleeing their troubled homelands, they could set foot in their promised land - and it came with a German face so friendly that it brought some newcomers to tears of joy.
More than 7,000 Arab and Asian asylum seekers surged across Hungary's western border into Austria and Germany following the latest in a string of erratic policy U-turns by Hungary's immigrant-loathing government. Within hours, travelers predominantly from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan who had been told for days they could not leave Hungary were scooped from roadsides and Budapest's central train station and placed on overnight buses, driven to the frontier with Austria and allowed to walk across as a new morning dawned.

They were met with wholly unexpected hospitality featuring free high-speed trains, seemingly bottomless boxes of supplies, and gauntlets of well-wishers offering trays of candy for everyone and cuddly toys for the tots in mothers' arms. Even adults absorbed the scenes of sudden welcome with a look of childlike wonderment as Germans and Austrians made clear that they had reached a land that just might become a home. "I'm very glad to be in Germany. I hope that I find here a much better life. I want to work," said Homam Shehade, a 37-year-old Syrian shopkeeper who spent 25 days on the road. He left behind his parents, a brother, wife, a 7-year-old boy and a 2 1/2-year-old girl. He hopes to bring them all to Germany. Until then, he said: "I hope that God protects them from the planes and bombs. My shop was bombed and my house was bombed."


Refugees flash victory signs and wipe away tears as they arrive at the main train station in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015. Hundreds of refugees arrived in various trains to get first registration as asylum seekers in Germany.

As the migrants departed Hungary, leaders took a few final swipes at their departing guests and those considered foolish enough to host them. Prime Minister Viktor Orban told reporters that Hungary collected and drove the migrants to the border only because they were posing a public menace, particularly by snarling traffic and rail lines west of Budapest when they mounted a series of surprise breakouts from police-controlled positions Friday and headed for Austria in large groups on foot.

Orban said the people being taken by Germany mostly come "from regions that are not ravaged by war. They just want to live the kind of life that we have. And I understand that, but this is impossible. If we let everybody in, it's going to destroy Europe." Orban said Hungary was determined to staunch the flow of foreigners traversing the country. He criticized European Union plans to reach a bloc-wide agreement at a summit Sept. 14 committing each nation to accept higher quotas of foreigners to shelter, arguing that this would only spur more one-way traffic. "What will it solve if we divide 50,000 or 100,000 migrants among us, when uncountable millions will be on the way?" Orban said.

MORE
See also:

Thousands of jubilant migrants arrive in Austria from Hungary
Sat September 5, 2015 | Under a cold rain, waves of exhausted migrants late Saturday continued to pour into the border town of Nickelsdorf, in Austria's Burgenland state.
Earlier, some Austrians let out welcoming cheers as busloads of refugees pulled up on their border with Hungary -- and weary passengers clutching children streamed toward them. The passengers carried their meager belongings in backpacks as they exited the vehicles in the rain. They walked on foot over the border to Nickelsdorf, where applause broke out among groups welcoming the convoys of buses with food and water. The Austrian Red Cross also provided medical supplies and warm blankets.

At least 5,500 refugees have arrived in Austria from Hungary since Friday night, the United Nations refugee agency said Saturday. Some 2,500 are still in the border town of Nickelsdorf and are waiting to head to the capital, Vienna, the UNHCR said via Twitter. Deputy Chief of Burgenland State Police Werner Fasching earlier said about 10,000 migrants were expected in total. There are only enough beds for 600 people in and around Nickelsdorf, and the bulk of the refugees are being sent to Vienna via trains and buses, he said. "We are trying to move as many as possible in the direction of Vienna," Fasching said. There the migrants will receive food, drink and, if needed, medical care. Some who wish to continue on to Germany will be permitted to do so.


A Syrian refugee girl in her mother's arms waiting in the rain to move onto buses for their onward journey to Austria

Their arrival in Austria caps an emotional week for the migrants, many of whom had walked for hours before they got into dozens of buses provided by the Hungarian authorities. But the busing was only a temporary solution for this band of refuge seekers, leaving questions about what will be done for the thousands of other Syrian and other migrants still crossing the Mediterranean and traveling north through Europe. In light of this week's acute situation, Austrian and German officials agreed to allow thousands of migrants into their countries, Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann said.

The UNHCR said it "welcomes the decision of Austria and Germany to receive thousands of refugees and migrants who crossed the border last night from Hungary. This is political leadership based on humanitarian values." And it's not just the politicians who have extended a hand. Some individuals in Vienna are donating train tickets for refugees heading onwards across Europe, the UNHCR said, while others elsewhere are giving food and supplies. UNHCR spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said the refugees she'd met at a Vienna station were enormously grateful for the welcome they'd received since reaching Austria.

Trains stopped
 
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Maggdy

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Refugees welcomed with candy & toys...

CANDY AND CUDDLY TOYS: MIGRANTS FINISH EPIC TREK TO GERMANY
Sep 5,`15 -- For weeks while they traveled a punitive road, Europe cast a cold and callous eye on their unwelcome progress. On Saturday, for the first time since fleeing their troubled homelands, they could set foot in their promised land - and it came with a German face so friendly that it brought some newcomers to tears of joy.
More than 7,000 Arab and Asian asylum seekers surged across Hungary's western border into Austria and Germany following the latest in a string of erratic policy U-turns by Hungary's immigrant-loathing government. Within hours, travelers predominantly from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan who had been told for days they could not leave Hungary were scooped from roadsides and Budapest's central train station and placed on overnight buses, driven to the frontier with Austria and allowed to walk across as a new morning dawned.

They were met with wholly unexpected hospitality featuring free high-speed trains, seemingly bottomless boxes of supplies, and gauntlets of well-wishers offering trays of candy for everyone and cuddly toys for the tots in mothers' arms. Even adults absorbed the scenes of sudden welcome with a look of childlike wonderment as Germans and Austrians made clear that they had reached a land that just might become a home. "I'm very glad to be in Germany. I hope that I find here a much better life. I want to work," said Homam Shehade, a 37-year-old Syrian shopkeeper who spent 25 days on the road. He left behind his parents, a brother, wife, a 7-year-old boy and a 2 1/2-year-old girl. He hopes to bring them all to Germany. Until then, he said: "I hope that God protects them from the planes and bombs. My shop was bombed and my house was bombed."


Refugees flash victory signs and wipe away tears as they arrive at the main train station in Munich, Germany, Saturday, Sept. 5, 2015. Hundreds of refugees arrived in various trains to get first registration as asylum seekers in Germany.

As the migrants departed Hungary, leaders took a few final swipes at their departing guests and those considered foolish enough to host them. Prime Minister Viktor Orban told reporters that Hungary collected and drove the migrants to the border only because they were posing a public menace, particularly by snarling traffic and rail lines west of Budapest when they mounted a series of surprise breakouts from police-controlled positions Friday and headed for Austria in large groups on foot.

Orban said the people being taken by Germany mostly come "from regions that are not ravaged by war. They just want to live the kind of life that we have. And I understand that, but this is impossible. If we let everybody in, it's going to destroy Europe." Orban said Hungary was determined to staunch the flow of foreigners traversing the country. He criticized European Union plans to reach a bloc-wide agreement at a summit Sept. 14 committing each nation to accept higher quotas of foreigners to shelter, arguing that this would only spur more one-way traffic. "What will it solve if we divide 50,000 or 100,000 migrants among us, when uncountable millions will be on the way?" Orban said.

MORE
See also:

Thousands of jubilant migrants arrive in Austria from Hungary
Sat September 5, 2015 | Under a cold rain, waves of exhausted migrants late Saturday continued to pour into the border town of Nickelsdorf, in Austria's Burgenland state.
Earlier, some Austrians let out welcoming cheers as busloads of refugees pulled up on their border with Hungary -- and weary passengers clutching children streamed toward them. The passengers carried their meager belongings in backpacks as they exited the vehicles in the rain. They walked on foot over the border to Nickelsdorf, where applause broke out among groups welcoming the convoys of buses with food and water. The Austrian Red Cross also provided medical supplies and warm blankets.

At least 5,500 refugees have arrived in Austria from Hungary since Friday night, the United Nations refugee agency said Saturday. Some 2,500 are still in the border town of Nickelsdorf and are waiting to head to the capital, Vienna, the UNHCR said via Twitter. Deputy Chief of Burgenland State Police Werner Fasching earlier said about 10,000 migrants were expected in total. There are only enough beds for 600 people in and around Nickelsdorf, and the bulk of the refugees are being sent to Vienna via trains and buses, he said. "We are trying to move as many as possible in the direction of Vienna," Fasching said. There the migrants will receive food, drink and, if needed, medical care. Some who wish to continue on to Germany will be permitted to do so.


A Syrian refugee girl in her mother's arms waiting in the rain to move onto buses for their onward journey to Austria

Their arrival in Austria caps an emotional week for the migrants, many of whom had walked for hours before they got into dozens of buses provided by the Hungarian authorities. But the busing was only a temporary solution for this band of refuge seekers, leaving questions about what will be done for the thousands of other Syrian and other migrants still crossing the Mediterranean and traveling north through Europe. In light of this week's acute situation, Austrian and German officials agreed to allow thousands of migrants into their countries, Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann said.

The UNHCR said it "welcomes the decision of Austria and Germany to receive thousands of refugees and migrants who crossed the border last night from Hungary. This is political leadership based on humanitarian values." And it's not just the politicians who have extended a hand. Some individuals in Vienna are donating train tickets for refugees heading onwards across Europe, the UNHCR said, while others elsewhere are giving food and supplies. UNHCR spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said the refugees she'd met at a Vienna station were enormously grateful for the welcome they'd received since reaching Austria.

Trains stopped
Hungary is now, in the wrong place at the wrong time!!!
Schengen Area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Scangenihatar.png
schengenarea.jpg

"German Big News:
Hungary is not exactly known for his sensitive handling of refugees. “The boat is full”, a government spokesman had said recently. Tens of thousands of migrants have died in recent months in the EU country. That should change now. At 175 kilometers, can the national-conservative Prime Minister Viktor Orbán erect a barbed wire fence on the border with Serbia. For the building also convicts are employed. Hungary has introduced a lot of the criticism of the EU, of human rights defenders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel. One should not isolate themselves, she said. But not everyone in the CDU shares the concerns.
“The criticism of Hungary is hypocritical,” now says the Saxon CDU general secretary Michael Kretschmer SPIEGEL ONLINE. “It is their duty to control illegal migration.” With fences one could draw the refugees in certain areas and to register there better. “I think that’s right.” For Kretschmer the problem lies primarily at the external borders of the EU: “Many countries break the contracts, by failing to register refugees and they just send on to Europe.” His solution for the German security: more international strip, collaborations with the Czech Republic or Poland instead of fixed border control..."
more:
German Big News: Saxony CDU general secretary defended Hungary’s fence construction – SPIEGEL ONLINE
 

sarahgop

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Its amazing that Europe is powerless to stop the invasion. The other muslim nations are smart enough to give these invaders the finger and keep them the hell out.
 

Maggdy

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Its amazing that Europe is powerless to stop the invasion. The other muslim nations are smart enough to give these invaders the finger and keep them the hell out.
Who are the Europa? The peoples of Europe? Indeed, citizens want to stop the invasion?

There are many people, who proclaim: "no borders, no nations!"

The New York Time:
"Germans Welcome Migrants After Long Journey Through Hungary and Austria"
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/09/0...s-austria-hungary-germany.html?_r=0&referrer=

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